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1.
Future Oncol ; 17(32): 4389-4395, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372054

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed many aspects of our everyday lives and medical practice, including oncology treatment; thyroid cancer surgery is not an exception. The reported number of fine-needle aspirations performed during the first semester of 2020 was significantly reduced. Poorly differentiated, medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors are considered important indications for immediate surgical intervention. By contrast, most well-differentiated carcinomas present slow growth, and thus surgery can be deferred for a short period of time during which patients are under active surveillance. Thyroid surgeries have decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, prior to any intervention, negative COVID-19 status - with the use of a nasopharyngeal swab and reverse transcription PCR assay as the gold standard and chest CT scan as a complementary modality in some cases - must be confirmed to achieve a COVID-free pathway. Thorough preoperative assessment regarding both oncological and anatomical aspects should be performed to identify optimal timing for safe management.


Subject(s)
Primary Prevention/methods , Thyroid Neoplasms/surgery , Thyroidectomy/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment , Triage/methods , Biopsy, Fine-Needle , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thyroid Gland/pathology , Thyroid Neoplasms/pathology
3.
Oncol Lett ; 20(1): 441-447, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626618

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused unprecedented societal turmoil, triggering a rapid, still ongoing, transformation of healthcare provision on a global level. In this new landscape, it is highly important to acknowledge the challenges this pandemic poses on the care of the particularly vulnerable cancer patients and the subsequent psychosocial impact on them. We have outlined our clinical experience in managing patients with gastrointestinal, hematological, gynaecological, dermatological, neurological, thyroid, lung and paediatric cancers in the COVID-19 era and have reviewed the emerging literature around barriers to care of oncology patients and how this crisis affects them. Moreover, evolving treatment strategies and novel ways of addressing the needs of oncology patients in the new context of the pandemic are discussed.

4.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(1): 159-162, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380042

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global public health emergency resulting in unprecedented individual and societal fear and anxiety. The stress surrounding this biothreat appears to have clinical implications in all aspects of medicine, both in mental and physical health spheres. The impact of COVID-19 related anxiety in Cardiology, Paediatrics, Oncology, Dermatology, Neurology and Mental Health and how it affects treatments is discussed. Moreover, the need for introducing novel communication and therapeutic approaches is highlighted in the new landscape of the COVID-19 era.

5.
Exp Ther Med ; 19(6): 3451-3453, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-87404

ABSTRACT

In light of the unprecedented public health crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is highly important to acknowledge the psychological impact of this mounting threat on healthcare professionals. Previous experience from smaller scale epidemics and emerging literature around COVID-19 show that the unparalleled amount of stress that healthcare workers are dealing with, is associated with increased psychological morbidities. We have depicted the psychological burden that the COVID-19 pandemic has posed on healthcare professionals in Greece and have reviewed the literature around the effect of previous epidemics on frontline healthcare staff. Moreover, we discuss potential triggers and the need for measures to minimise the psychological pressure on those at the frontline against this biothreat.

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