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1.
G Chir ; 42(2): e02, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097497

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aims to evaluate how the measures to contain the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the surgical site infections (SSIs) rate in patients who underwent nondeferrable breast cancer surgery (BCS). Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a consecutive series of patients underwent nondeferrable BCS in a regional Italian Covid-free hub during two different period: March to April 2020 (pandemic cohort [PC]) and March till April 2019 (control cohort [CC]). SSIs were defined according to the criteria established by the Center for disease control and prevention (CDC) and additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent exudate, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay (ASEPSIS) scoring systems. Results: One hundred ninety-nine patients were included in the present study: 100 and 99 patients who underwent nondeferrable BCS from March to April 2020 (PC) and from March to April 2019 (CC), respectively. The overall SSIs rate in this series was 9.1% according to CDC criteria and 6.5% according to ASEPSIS criteria. The SSIs incidence decreased during the pandemic period. Moreover, the SSIs rate according to ASEPSIS criteria was statistically lower in the PC than in the CC. We observed significant evidence of higher SSIs, both in terms of CDC and ASEPSIS score, in patients having undergone breast reconstruction compared with patients not undergoing immediate reconstruction. Conclusions: The restrictive measures issued during the lockdown period seemed to lower the SSIs rates in patients undergoing nondeferrable BCS.

2.
Il Giornale di chirurgia ; 42(2):e02-e02, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1970331

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aims to evaluate how the measures to contain the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the surgical site infections (SSIs) rate in patients who underwent nondeferrable breast cancer surgery (BCS). Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a consecutive series of patients underwent nondeferrable BCS in a regional Italian Covid-free hub during two different period: March to April 2020 (pandemic cohort [PC]) and March till April 2019 (control cohort [CC]). SSIs were defined according to the criteria established by the Center for disease control and prevention (CDC) and additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent exudate, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay (ASEPSIS) scoring systems. Results: One hundred ninety-nine patients were included in the present study: 100 and 99 patients who underwent nondeferrable BCS from March to April 2020 (PC) and from March to April 2019 (CC), respectively. The overall SSIs rate in this series was 9.1% according to CDC criteria and 6.5% according to ASEPSIS criteria. The SSIs incidence decreased during the pandemic period. Moreover, the SSIs rate according to ASEPSIS criteria was statistically lower in the PC than in the CC. We observed significant evidence of higher SSIs, both in terms of CDC and ASEPSIS score, in patients having undergone breast reconstruction compared with patients not undergoing immediate reconstruction. Conclusions: The restrictive measures issued during the lockdown period seemed to lower the SSIs rates in patients undergoing nondeferrable BCS.

3.
J Geriatr Oncol ; 12(8): 1253-1255, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281459

ABSTRACT

Central studies carried out on vaccines against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV2) excluded patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy and those diagnosed with an immunosuppressive condition. Moreover, there are no data on vaccine efficacy regarding older patients with cancer. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to evaluate the seroprevalence of the SARS-CoV2 IgG in older patients (aged ≥80 years) diagnosed with solid or hematological malignancies, one month after administering the second dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We screened 74 older patients with cancer, 45 of them accepted to receive the vaccination and collected serum samples from 36 patients; a group of medical doctors and nurses from our hospital was used as a control in a 1:2 ratio. RESULTS: The median age was 82 years (range 80-89). Median serum IgG were 2396,10 AU/ml (range 0-32,763,00) in patients with cancer and 8737,49 AU/ml (398.90-976,280,00) in the control group, p < 0.0001. Additional subgroup analyses were performed comparing males and females, patients treated with chemotherapy versus other therapies (immunotherapy, targeted therapy), solid tumors versus hematological malignancies, early (I-II) versus advanced (III-IV) stage of disease, continuative corticosteroid use or not. None of them reached statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Our study shows for the first time that patients with cancer aged ≥80 years can have a serological response to the BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine one month after vaccination and consequently support the vaccination campaign currently underway in this frail population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/drug therapy , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Vaccination
4.
Front Surg ; 7: 563006, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983763

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak, in a few weeks, overloaded Italian hospitals, and the majority of medical procedures were postponed. During the pandemic, with hospital reorganization, clinical and learning activities performed by residents suffered a forced remodulation. The objective of this study is to investigate how urology training in Italy has been affected during the COVID-19 era. In this multi-academic study, we compared residents' training during the highest outbreak level with their previous activity. Overall 387 (67.1%) of the 577 Italian Urology residents participated in a 72-h anonymous online survey with 36 items sent via email. The main outcomes were clinical/surgical activities, social distancing, distance learning, and telemedicine. Clinical and learning activity was significantly reduced for the overall group, and after categorizing residents as those working only in COVID hospitals, both "junior" and "senior" residents, and those working in any of three geographical areas created (Italian regions were clustered in three major zones according to the prevalence of COVID-19). A significant decrease in outpatient activity, invasive diagnostic procedures, and endoscopic and major surgeries was reported. Through multivariate analysis, the specific year of residency has been found to be an independent predictor for all response modification. Being in zone 3 and zone 2 and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors associated with a lower reduction of the clinical and learning activity. Working in a COVID hospital and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors associated with higher reduction of the outpatient activity. Working in zone 3 and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors of lower and higher outpatient surgical activity, respectively. Working in a COVID hospital was an independent predictor associated with robotic surgical activity. The majority of residents reported that distance teaching and multidisciplinary virtual meetings are still not used, and 44.8% reported that their relationships with colleagues decreased. The COVID-19 pandemic presents an unprecedented challenge, including changes in the training and education of urology residents. The COVID era can offer an opportunity to balance and implement innovative solutions that can bridge the educational gap and can be part of future urology training.

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