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1.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(2): 106217, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic stroke. The use echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 has not been explored. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 368 patients hospitalized between 3/1/2020 and 5/31/2020 who had laboratory-confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and underwent transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization. Patients were categorized according to the presence of ischemic stroke on cerebrovascular imaging following echocardiography. Ischemic stroke was identified in 49 patients (13.3%). We characterized the risk of ischemic stroke using a novel composite risk score of clinical and echocardiographic variables: age <55, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg, anticoagulation prior to admission, left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus. RESULTS: Patients with ischemic stroke had no difference in biomarkers of inflammation and hypercoagulability compared to those without ischemic stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke had significantly more left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus (48.3% vs 27.9%, p = 0.04; 4.2% vs 0.7%, p = 0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio of the composite novel COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score for the likelihood of ischemic stroke was 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.4-16.1). The AUC for the risk score was 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score utilizes clinical and echocardiographic parameters to robustly estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and supports the use of echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Echocardiography/methods , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thrombosis
2.
Int J Cardiol ; 346: 100-102, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527699

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are currently no clear guidelines regarding the use of ultrasound enhancing agents (UEAs) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for patients hospitalized with Covid-19. We investigated whether the performance of TTE with UEAs provides more diagnostic information and allows for shorter acquisition time compared to unenhanced TTE imaging in this patient population. METHODS: We analyzed the TTEs of 107 hospitalized Covid-19 patients between April and June 2020 who were administered UEAs (Definity®, Lantheus). The time to acquire images with and without UEAs was calculated. A level III echocardiographer determined if new, clinically significant findings were visualized with the addition of UEAs. RESULTS: There was a mean of 11.84±3.59 UEA cineloops/study vs 20.74±8.10 non-UEA cineloops/study (p < 0.0001). Mean time to acquire UEA cineloop images was 72.28±28.18 s/study compared to 188.07±86.04 s/study for non-UEA cineloop images (p < 0.0001). Forty-eight patients (45%) had at least one new finding on UEA imaging, with a total of 62 new findings seen. New information gained with UEAs was more likely to be found in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (21 vs 9, p < 0.001) and in those on mechanical ventilation (21 vs 15, p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: TTE with UEAs required less time and fewer cineloop images compared to non-UEA imaging in patients hospitalized with Covid-19. Additionally, Covid-19 patients with severe respiratory disease benefited most with regard to new diagnostic information. Health care personnel should consider early use of UEAs in select hospitalized Covid-19 patients in order to reduce exposure and optimize diagnostic yield.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Echocardiography , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography
3.
Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association ; 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1505382

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 has been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic stroke. The use echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 has not been explored. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 368 patients hospitalized between 3/1/2020 and 5/31/2020 who had laboratory-confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and underwent transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization. Patients were categorized according to the presence of ischemic stroke on cerebrovascular imaging following echocardiography. Ischemic stroke was identified in 49 patients (13.3%). We characterized the risk of ischemic stroke using a novel composite risk score of clinical and echocardiographic variables: age <55, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg, anticoagulation prior to admission, left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus. Results Patients with ischemic stroke had no difference in biomarkers of inflammation and hypercoagulability compared to those without ischemic stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke had significantly more left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus (48.3% vs 27.9%, p = 0.04;4.2% vs 0.7%, p = 0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio of the composite novel COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score for the likelihood of ischemic stroke was 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.4-16.1). The AUC for the risk score was 0.70. Conclusions The COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score utilizes clinical and echocardiographic parameters to robustly estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and supports the use of echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

5.
JACC Clin Electrophysiol ; 7(9): 1120-1130, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198841

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to determine the incidence, predictors, and outcomes of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). BACKGROUND: COVID-19 results in increased inflammatory markers previously associated with atrial arrhythmias. However, little is known about their incidence or specificity in COVID-19 or their association with outcomes. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,970 patients admitted with polymerase chain reaction-positive COVID-19 between February 4 and April 22, 2020, with manual review performed of 1,110. The comparator arm included 1,420 patients with influenza hospitalized between January 1, 2017, and January 1, 2020. RESULTS: Among 3,970 inpatients with COVID-19, the incidence of AF/AFL was 10% (n = 375) and in patients without a history of atrial arrhythmias it was 4% (n = 146). Patients with new-onset AF/AFL were older with increased inflammatory markers including interleukin 6 (93 vs. 68 pg/ml; p < 0.01), and more myocardial injury (troponin-I: 0.2 vs. 0.06 ng/ml; p < 0.01). AF and AFL were associated with increased mortality (46% vs. 26%; p < 0.01). Manual review captured a somewhat higher incidence of AF/AFL (13%, n = 140). Compared to inpatients with COVID-19, patients with influenza (n = 1,420) had similar rates of AF/AFL (12%, n = 163) but lower mortality. The presence of AF/AFL correlated with similarly increased mortality in both COVID-19 (relative risk: 1.77) and influenza (relative risk: 1.78). CONCLUSIONS: AF/AFL occurs in a subset of patients hospitalized with either COVID-19 or influenza and is associated with inflammation and disease severity in both infections. The incidence and associated increase in mortality in both cohorts suggests that AF/AFL is not specific to COVID-19, but is rather a generalized response to the systemic inflammation of severe viral illnesses.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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