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1.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(s1): S11-S18, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318376

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine programs are particularly suited to evaluating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders, primarily because much of the physical exam findings are visual. Telemedicine uses information and communication technologies to overcome geographical barriers and increase access to healthcare service. It is particularly beneficial for rural and underserved communities, groups that traditionally suffer from lack of access to healthcare. There is a growing evidence of the feasibility of telemedicine, cost and time savings, patients' and physicians' satisfaction, and its outcome and impact on patients' morbidity and quality of life. In addition, given the unusual current situation with the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has offered the opportunity to address the ongoing healthcare needs of patients with PD, to reduce in-person clinic visits, and human exposures (among healthcare workers and patients) to a range of infectious diseases including COVID-19. However, there are still several challenges to widespread implementation of telemedicine including the limited performance of parts of the neurological exam, limited technological savvy, fear of loss of a personal connection, or uneasiness about communicating sensitive information. On the other hand, while we are facing the new wave of COVID-19 pandemic, patients and clinicians are gaining increasing experience with telemedicine, facilitating equity of access to specialized multidisciplinary care for PD. This article summarizes and reviews the current state and future directions of telemedicine from a global perspective.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(3): 374-383, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254370

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Teleneurology has become widely adopted during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic. However, provider impressions about the teleneurology experience are not well described. Methods: A novel questionnaire was developed to collect provider impressions about video teleneurology encounters. All providers in the University of Pennsylvania Health System (UPHS) Neurology Department (N = 162) were asked to complete a questionnaire after each video teleneurology patient encounter between April and August 2020. Individual patient and encounter-level data were extracted from the electronic medical record. Results: One thousand six hundred three surveys were completed by 55 providers (response rate of 10.12%). The history obtained and the ability to connect with the patient were considered the same or better than an in-person visit in almost all encounters. The quality of the physician-patient relationship was good or excellent in 93%, while the overall experience was the same as an in-person visit in 73% of visits and better in 12%. Sixty-eight percent of respondents reported that none of the elements of the neurological examination if performed in person would have changed the assessment and plan. Assessment of the visit as the same or better increased from 83% in April to 89% in July and 95% in August. Headache (91%), multiple sclerosis and neuroimmunology (96%), and movement disorder (89%) providers had the highest proportion of ratings of same or better overall experience and neuromuscular providers the lowest (60%). Conclusions: Provider impressions about the teleneurology history, examination, and provider-patient relationship are favorable in the majority of responses. Important differences emerge between provider specialty and visit characteristics groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(s1): S11-S18, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083887

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine programs are particularly suited to evaluating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders, primarily because much of the physical exam findings are visual. Telemedicine uses information and communication technologies to overcome geographical barriers and increase access to healthcare service. It is particularly beneficial for rural and underserved communities, groups that traditionally suffer from lack of access to healthcare. There is a growing evidence of the feasibility of telemedicine, cost and time savings, patients' and physicians' satisfaction, and its outcome and impact on patients' morbidity and quality of life. In addition, given the unusual current situation with the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has offered the opportunity to address the ongoing healthcare needs of patients with PD, to reduce in-person clinic visits, and human exposures (among healthcare workers and patients) to a range of infectious diseases including COVID-19. However, there are still several challenges to widespread implementation of telemedicine including the limited performance of parts of the neurological exam, limited technological savvy, fear of loss of a personal connection, or uneasiness about communicating sensitive information. On the other hand, while we are facing the new wave of COVID-19 pandemic, patients and clinicians are gaining increasing experience with telemedicine, facilitating equity of access to specialized multidisciplinary care for PD. This article summarizes and reviews the current state and future directions of telemedicine from a global perspective.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics
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