Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
New Microbiologica ; 45(3):181-189, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2157232

ABSTRACT

Background. Pregnant women may be at an increased risk of developing severe or critical disease associated with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection causing severities during pregnancy. We performed a prospective study to describe the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy outcomes and on the newborn, depending on the severity of the disease. The antibody response and persistence of SARS-CoV-2 anti-Spike (S) IgG, IgA and anti-Nucleocapsid ('MCP) IgG, was investigated. Methods. A total of 48 pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection were enrolled, and sequential serum samples from 30 of them were collected until one year after infection. Outcomes of pregnancy and newborn parameters were evaluated in comparison with 200 uninfected controls. Results. Asymptomatic infection was observed in 31/48 women (64.5%), mild COVID-19 in 12/48 women (25.0%), while 5/48 women (10.5%) developed pneumonia Women with pneumonia mounted significantly higher levels of anti-S IgG, IgA and anti-NCP IgG between land 3 months after onset of infection compared to asymptomatic women. Anti-S IgG persisted in the majority of women from 6 months to at least one year after infection, especially in those with symptomatic infection and pneumonia, while anti-S IgA and anti-NCP IgG declined earlier. Pregnancy complications and newborn parameters were not significantly different from those observed in uninfected controls. Conclusion. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody development and persistence was not impaired in pregnant women, while SARS-CoV-2 infection did not cause major pregnancy or newborn complications in asymptomatic or symptomatic women, nor in women with pneumonia receiving prompt clinical care.

2.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine ; 34(SUPPL 1):44, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1517730

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION When COVID-19 first spread in Europe, it was unclear if the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) could be transmitted from mother to fetus. Hence, doubts arose as the best way to deliver considering that caesarean delivery (CD) indeed could prevent vertical transmission. METHODS We calculated CD rate in 5 Italian regions (Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Umbria, Sardinia) differently affected by the first wave of the pandemic. Data were retrospectively obtained from each birth center and aggregated by areas (provinces). Data related to March-April 2020, corresponding to first COVID-19 peak in Italy, were compared with the March-April 2019 as well with November-December 2019, and odds ratio (ORs) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 24 provinces were included, covering 21.8% of the Italian population. Overall CD rate did not differ in the three examined periods: neither in the comparison of March-April 2019 (reference period) versus November-December 2019 (OR: 0.98 95% CI 0.93-1.05) nor in the comparison of the reference period versus March-April 2020 (OR: 1.03;95 % CI 0.98-1.09). CD rate did not change even in areas with the highest incidence of COVID-19. Only 17 out of 3.257 CDs was due to direct COVID-19 complications (0.5%;95% CI 0.3-0.8). No pregnant women with COVID-19 proven infection died. CONCLUSIONS The first wave of COVID-19 pandemic did not significantly affect delivery mode in Italy, even in areas with the highest infection rates.

3.
New Microbiologica ; 44(3):25, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481763

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy is relatively unknown. In this study we report the potential impact of undiagnosed SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy loss in the first half of pregnancy by comparing the prevalence of the infection in a retrospective group of pregnant women with miscarriage (n=62) and a prospective control group with no pregnancy loss in the first trimester (n=218). Of 62 women who had miscarriage, 2 (3.2%) resulted IgM for SARS-CoV-2 negative and IgG seropositive, while of 218 pregnant women, 5 (2.3 %) resulted IgM for SARS-CoV- 2 and IgG seropositive. The SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence was not significantly different in the two groups of women, therefore excluding a significant role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy loss. Therefore, our data show that SARS-CoV-2 infection within the first trimester does not seem to predispose to early pregnancy loss and that the impact of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy appears limited.

4.
International Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health [Electronic Resource] ; 18(8):16, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208611

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus emergency spread to Italy when little was known about the infection's impact on mothers and newborns. This study aims to describe the extent to which clinical practice has protected childbirth physiology and preserved the mother-child bond during the first wave of the pandemic in Italy. A national population-based prospective cohort study was performed enrolling women with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted for childbirth to any Italian hospital from 25 February to 31 July 2020. All cases were prospectively notified, and information on peripartum care (mother-newborn separation, skin-to-skin contact, breastfeeding, and rooming-in) and maternal and perinatal outcomes were collected in a structured form and entered in a web-based secure system. The paper describes a cohort of 525 SARS-CoV-2 positive women who gave birth. At hospital admission, 44.8% of the cohort was asymptomatic. At delivery, 51.9% of the mothers had a birth support person in the delivery room;the average caesarean section rate of 33.7% remained stable compared to the national figure. On average, 39.0% of mothers were separated from their newborns at birth, 26.6% practised skin-to-skin, 72.1% roomed in with their babies, and 79.6% of the infants received their mother's milk. The infants separated and not separated from their SARS-CoV-2 positive mothers both had good outcomes. At the beginning of the pandemic, childbirth raised awareness and concern due to limited available evidence and led to "better safe than sorry" care choices. An improvement of the peripartum care indicators was observed over time.

5.
Obstetrics & Gynecology ; 136(2):252-258, 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1044008

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical evolution of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in hospitalized pregnant women and potential factors associated with severe maternal outcomes. METHODS: We designed a prospective multicenter cohort study of pregnant women with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection who were admitted to 12 Italian maternity hospitals between February 23 and March 28, 2020. Clinical records, laboratory and radiologic examinations, and pregnancy outcomes were collected. A subgroup of patients with severe disease was identified based on intensive care unit (ICU) admission, delivery for respiratory compromise, or both. RESULTS: Seventy-seven patients were included, 14 of whom had severe disease (18%). Two thirds of the patients in the cohort were admitted during the third trimester, and 84% were symptomatic on admission. Eleven patients underwent urgent delivery for respiratory compromise (16%), and six were admitted to the ICU (8%). One woman received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation;no deaths occurred. Preterm delivery occurred in 12% of patients, and nine newborns were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Patients in the severe subgroup had significantly higher pregestational body mass indexes (BMIs) and heart and respiratory rates and a greater frequency of fever or dyspnea on admission compared with women with a nonsevere disease evolution. CONCLUSION: In our cohort, one in five women hospitalized with COVID-19 infection delivered urgently for respiratory compromise or were admitted to the ICU. None, however, died. Increased pregestational BMI and abnormal heart and respiratory rates on admission were associated with severe disease.

6.
BJOG ; 127(9): 1116-1121, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125441

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report mode of delivery and immediate neonatal outcome in women infected with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Twelve hospitals in northern Italy. PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women with COVID-19-confirmed infection who delivered. EXPOSURE: COVID 19 infection in pregnancy. METHODS: SARS-CoV-2-infected women who were admitted and delivered from 1 to 20 March 2020 were eligible. Data were collected from the clinical records using a standardised questionnaire on maternal general characteristics, any medical or obstetric co-morbidity, course of pregnancy, clinical signs and symptoms, treatment of COVID 19 infection, mode of delivery, neonatal data and breastfeeding. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: Data on mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. RESULTS: In all, 42 women with COVID-19 delivered at the participating centres; 24 (57.1%, 95% CI 41.0-72.3) delivered vaginally. An elective caesarean section was performed in 18/42 (42.9%, 95% CI 27.7-59.0) cases: in eight cases the indication was unrelated to COVID-19 infection. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 19/42 (45.2%, 95% CI 29.8-61.3) cases: of these, 7/19 (36.8%, 95% CI 16.3-61.6) required oxygen support and 4/19 (21.1%, 95% CI 6.1-45.6) were admitted to a critical care unit. Two women with COVID-19 breastfed without a mask because infection was diagnosed in the postpartum period: their newborns tested positive for SARS-Cov-2 infection. In one case, a newborn had a positive test after a vaginal operative delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Although postpartum infection cannot be excluded with 100% certainty, these findings suggest that vaginal delivery is associated with a low risk of intrapartum SARS-Cov-2 transmission to the newborn. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: This study suggests that vaginal delivery may be associated with a low risk of intrapartum SARS-Cov-2 transmission to the newborn.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Delivery, Obstetric/adverse effects , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Italy , Male , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vagina/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL