Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313936

ABSTRACT

A subset of patients has long-lasting symptoms after mild to moderate COVID-19. In a prospective observational cohort study we analysed clinical and laboratory parameters in 42 patients (29 female/13 male, median age 36.5 years) with persistent moderate to severe fatigue and exertion intolerance six months following COVID-19 referred to as Chronic COVID-19 Syndrome (CCS). Most patients were moderately to severely impaired in daily live. 19 patients fulfilled the 2003 Canadian Consensus Criteria for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome referred to as CFS/CCS. Hand grip strength (HGS) was diminished in most patients. Association of several biomarker with key symptoms of physical and mental fatigue and post exertional malaise indicate low level inflammation and hypoperfusion as potential pathomechanisms.

2.
J Clin Med ; 11(3)2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686839

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Female sex is considered a risk factor for Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness (ICUAW). The aim is to investigate sex-specific aspects of skeletal muscle metabolism in the context of ICUAW. (2) Methods: This is a sex-specific sub-analysis from two prospectively conducted trials examining skeletal muscle metabolism and advanced muscle activating measures in critical illness. Muscle strength was assessed by Medical Research Council Score. The insulin sensitivity index was analyzed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (HE) clamp. Muscular metabolites were studied by microdialysis. M. vastus lateralis biopsies were taken. The molecular analysis included protein degradation pathways. Morphology was assessed by myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA). Multivariable linear regression models for the effect of sex on outcome parameters were performed. (3) Results: n = 83 (♂n = 57, 68.7%; ♀n = 26, 31.3%) ICU patients were included. ICUAW was present in 81.1%♂ and in 82.4%♀ at first awakening (p = 0.911) and in 59.5%♂ and in 70.6%♀ at ICU discharge (p = 0.432). Insulin sensitivity index was reduced more in women than in men (p = 0.026). Sex was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity index and MCSA of Type IIa fibers in the adjusted regression models. (4) Conclusion: This hypothesis-generating analysis suggests that more pronounced impairments in insulin sensitivity and lower MCSA of Type IIa fibers in critically ill women may be relevant for sex differences in ICUAW.

3.
Obes Facts ; 15(1): 90-98, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571513

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Neuropilin 1 (NRP-1) is a novel co-receptor promoting SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Animal data indicate a role in trans-endothelial lipid transport and storage. As human data are sparse, we aimed to assess the role of NRP-1 in 2 metabolic active tissues in human obesity and in the context of weight loss-induced short- and long-term metabolic changes. METHODS: After a standardized 12-week weight reduction program, 143 subjects (age >18; body mass index ≥27 kg/m2, 78% female) were randomized to a 12-month lifestyle intervention or a control group using a stratified randomization scheme. This was followed by 6-month follow-up without any intervention. Phenotyping was performed before and after weight loss, after 12-month intervention and after subsequent 6 months of follow-up. Tissue-specific insulin sensitivity was estimated by HOMA-IR (whole body and mostly driven by liver), insulin sensitivity index (ISI)Clamp (predominantly skeletal muscle), and free fatty acid (FFA) suppression during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (FFASupp) (predominantly adipose tissue). NRP-1 mRNA expression was measured in subcutaneous adipose tissue (NRP-1AT) and skeletal muscle (NRP-1SM) before and after weight loss. RESULTS: NRP-1 was highly expressed in adipose tissue (7,893 [7,303-8,536] counts), but neither NRP-1AT nor NRP-1SM were related to estimates of obesity. Higher NRP-1AT was associated with stronger FFASupp (r = -0.343, p = 0.003) and a tendency to higher ISIClamp (r = 0.202, p = 0.085). Weight loss induced a decline of NRP-1AT but not NRP-1SM. This was more pronounced in subjects with stronger reduction of adipose ACE-2 mRNA expression (r = 0.250; p = 0.032) but was not associated with short- and long-term improvement of FFASupp and ISIClamp. CONCLUSION: NRP-1AT is related to adipose insulin sensitivity in obesity. Weight loss-induced decline of NRP-1AT seems not to be involved in metabolic short- and long-term improvements after weight loss. However, weight loss-induced reduction of both NRP-1AT and ACE-2AT indicates a lower susceptibility of adipose tissue for SARS-CoV-2 after body weight reduction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Insulin Resistance , Adipose Tissue , Female , Humans , Male , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Obesity/genetics , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Loss
4.
Metabolism ; 113: 154401, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-2 is a modulator of adipose tissue metabolism. However, human data of adipose ACE-2 is rarely available. Considering that, ACE-2 is believed to be the receptor responsible for cell entry of SARS-CoV-2, a better understanding of its regulation is desirable. We therefore characterized the modulation of subcutaneous adipose ACE-2 mRNA expression during weight loss and the impact of ACE-2 expression on weight loss induced short- and long-term improvements of glucose metabolism. METHODS: 143 subjects (age > 18; BMI ≥ 27 kg/m2) were analyzed before and after a standardized 12-week dietary weight reduction program. Afterwards subjects were randomized to a 12-month lifestyle intervention or a control group (Maintain-Adults trial). Insulin sensitivity (IS) was estimated by HOMA-IR (as an estimate of liver IS) and ISIClamp (as an estimate of skeletal muscle IS). ACE-2 mRNA expression (ACE-2AT) was measured in subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after weight loss. RESULTS: ACE-2AT was not affected by obesity, but was reduced in insulin resistant subjects. Weight loss resulted in a decline of ACE-2AT (29.0 (20.0-47.9) vs. 21.0 (13.0-31.0); p = 1.6 ∗ 10-7). A smaller reduction of ACE-2 AT (ΔACE-2AT) was associated with a larger improvement of ISIClamp (p = 0.013) during weight reduction over 3 months, but not with the extend of weight loss. The degree of changes in insulin resistance were preserved until month 12 and was also predicted by the weight loss induced degree of ΔACE-2AT (p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that subcutaneous adipose ACE-2 expression correlates with insulin sensitivity. Weight loss induced decline of subcutaneous adipose ACE-2 expression might affect short- and long-term improvement of myocellular insulin sensitivity, which might be also relevant in the context of ACE-2 downregulation by SARS-CoV-2. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00850629, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00850629, date of registration: February 25, 2009.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Weight Loss/physiology , Weight Reduction Programs , Adipose Tissue/enzymology , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caloric Restriction , Combined Modality Therapy , Exercise Therapy , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Humans , Insulin Resistance/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/therapy , Overweight/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
5.
Infection ; 48(4): 619-626, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597401

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide causing a global health emergency. Pa-COVID-19 aims to provide comprehensive data on clinical course, pathophysiology, immunology and outcome of COVID-19, to identify prognostic biomarkers, clinical scores, and therapeutic targets for improved clinical management and preventive interventions. METHODS: Pa-COVID-19 is a prospective observational cohort study of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection treated at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin. We collect data on epidemiology, demography, medical history, symptoms, clinical course, and pathogen testing and treatment. Systematic, serial blood sampling will allow deep molecular and immunological phenotyping, transcriptomic profiling, and comprehensive biobanking. Longitudinal data and sample collection during hospitalization will be supplemented by long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Outcome measures include the WHO clinical ordinal scale on day 15 and clinical, functional, and health-related quality-of-life assessments at discharge and during follow-up. We developed a scalable dataset to (i) suit national standards of care, (ii) facilitate comprehensive data collection in medical care facilities with varying resources, and (iii) allow for rapid implementation of interventional trials based on the standardized study design and data collection. We propose this scalable protocol as blueprint for harmonized data collection and deep phenotyping in COVID-19 in Germany. CONCLUSION: We established a basic platform for harmonized, scalable data collection, pathophysiological analysis, and deep phenotyping of COVID-19, which enables rapid generation of evidence for improved medical care and identification of candidate therapeutic and preventive strategies. The electronic database accredited for interventional trials allows fast trial implementation for candidate therapeutic agents. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered at the German registry for clinical studies (DRKS00021688).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Registries , Berlin/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Phenotype , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , World Health Organization
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL