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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312035

ABSTRACT

The nation-wide lockdown starting 25 March 2020, aimed at suppressing the spread of the COVID-19 disease, was extended until 31 May 2020 in three subsequent orders by the Government of India. The extended lockdown has had significant social and economic consequences and `lockdown fatigue' has likely set in. Phased reopening began from 01 June 2020 onwards. Mumbai, one of the most crowded cities in the world, has witnessed both the largest number of cases and deaths among all the cities in India (41986 positive cases and 1368 deaths as of 02 June 2020). Many tough decisions are going to be made on re-opening in the next few days. In an earlier IISc-TIFR Report, we presented an agent-based city-scale simulator(ABCS) to model the progression and spread of the infection in large metropolises like Mumbai and Bengaluru. As discussed in IISc-TIFR Report 1, ABCS is a useful tool to model interactions of city residents at an individual level and to capture the impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions on the infection spread. In this report we focus on Mumbai. Using our simulator, we consider some plausible scenarios for phased emergence of Mumbai from the lockdown, 01 June 2020 onwards. These include phased and gradual opening of the industry, partial opening of public transportation (modelling of infection spread in suburban trains), impact of containment zones on controlling infections, and the role of compliance with respect to various intervention measures including use of masks, case isolation, home quarantine, etc. The main takeaway of our simulation results is that a phased opening of workplaces, say at a conservative attendance level of 20 to 33\%, is a good way to restart economic activity while ensuring that the city's medical care capacity remains adequate to handle the possible rise in the number of COVID-19 patients in June and July.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-304926

ABSTRACT

We highlight the usefulness of city-scale agent-based simulators in studying various non-pharmaceutical interventions to manage an evolving pandemic. We ground our studies in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and demonstrate the power of the simulator via several exploratory case studies in two metropolises, Bengaluru and Mumbai. Such tools become common-place in any city administration's tool kit in our march towards digital health.

3.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(7): e427-e438, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278136

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global crisis profoundly affecting oncology care delivery. PURPOSE: This study will describe the occupational and personal consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on oncologist well-being and patient care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four virtual focus groups were conducted with US ASCO member oncologists (September-November 2020). Inquiry and subsequent discussions centered on self-reported accounts of professional and personal COVID-19 experiences affecting well-being, and oncologist recommendations for well-being interventions that the cancer organization and professional societies (ASCO) might implement were explored. Qualitative interviews were analyzed using Framework Analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-five oncologists were interviewed: median age 44 years (range: 35-69 years), 52% female, 52% racial or ethnic minority, 76% medical oncologists, 64% married, and an average of 51.5 patients seen per week (range: 20-120). Five thematic consequences emerged: (1) impact of pre-COVID-19 burnout, (2) occupational or professional limitations and adaptations, (3) personal implications, (4) concern for the future of cancer care and the workforce, and (5) recommendations for physician well-being interventions. Underlying oncologist burnout exacerbated stressors associated with disruptions in care, education, research, financial practice health, and telemedicine. Many feared delays in cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Oncologists noted personal and familial stressors related to COVID-19 exposure fears and loss of social support. Many participants strongly considered working part-time or taking early retirement. Yet, opportunities arose to facilitate personal growth and rise above pandemic adversity, fostering greater resilience. Recommendations for organizational well-being interventions included psychologic or peer support resources, flexible time-off, and ASCO and state oncology societies involvement to develop care guidelines, well-being resources, and mental health advocacy. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected oncologist burnout, fulfillment, practice health, cancer care, and workforce. It illuminates where professional organizations could play a significant role in oncologist well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oncologists , Adult , Burnout, Psychological , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e339-e353, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249568

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the well-being of the oncology clinician has never been more important. Well-being is a critical priority for the cancer organization because burnout adversely impacts the quality of care, patient satisfaction, the workforce, and overall practice success. To date, 45% of U.S. ASCO member medical oncologists report experiencing burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. As the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread with periods of outbreaks, recovery, and response with substantial personal and professional consequences for the clinician, it is imperative that the oncologist, team, and organization gain direct access to resources addressing burnout. In response, the Clinician Well-Being Task Force was created to improve the quality, safety, and value of cancer care by enhancing oncology clinician well-being and practice sustainability. Well-being is an integrative concept that characterizes quality of life and encompasses an individual's work- and personal health-related environmental, organizational, and psychosocial factors. These resources can be useful for the cancer organization to develop a well-being blueprint: a detailed start plan with recognized strategies and interventions targeting all oncology stakeholders to support a culture of community in oncology.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support , United States
5.
J Indian Inst Sci ; 100(4): 809-847, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1235814

ABSTRACT

We highlight the usefulness of city-scale agent-based simulators in studying various non-pharmaceutical interventions to manage an evolving pandemic. We ground our studies in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and demonstrate the power of the simulator via several exploratory case studies in two metropolises, Bengaluru and Mumbai. Such tools may in time become a common-place item in the tool kit of the administrative authorities of large cities.

7.
J Clin Oncol ; 39(2): 155-169, 2021 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013168

ABSTRACT

This report presents the American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) evaluation of the adaptations in care delivery, research operations, and regulatory oversight made in response to the coronavirus pandemic and presents recommendations for moving forward as the pandemic recedes. ASCO organized its recommendations for clinical research around five goals to ensure lessons learned from the COVID-19 experience are used to craft a more equitable, accessible, and efficient clinical research system that protects patient safety, ensures scientific integrity, and maintains data quality. The specific goals are: (1) ensure that clinical research is accessible, affordable, and equitable; (2) design more pragmatic and efficient clinical trials; (3) minimize administrative and regulatory burdens on research sites; (4) recruit, retain, and support a well-trained clinical research workforce; and (5) promote appropriate oversight and review of clinical trial conduct and results. Similarly, ASCO also organized its recommendations regarding cancer care delivery around five goals: (1) promote and protect equitable access to high-quality cancer care; (2) support safe delivery of high-quality cancer care; (3) advance policies to ensure oncology providers have sufficient resources to provide high-quality patient care; (4) recognize and address threats to clinician, provider, and patient well-being; and (5) improve patient access to high-quality cancer care via telemedicine. ASCO will work at all levels to advance the recommendations made in this report.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/therapy , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Research Design , Societies, Medical
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