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1.
Front Reprod Health ; 3: 705609, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089942

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Sexual and Reproductive Health access to Information services is still a pressing need for youth in Uganda even during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disrupted health care access in many countries. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges in access and utilization of sexual and reproductive health services as faced by youth during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Uganda. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out from 28th April 2020 to 11th May 2020 in Uganda. An online questionnaire was disseminated to youth aged between 18 and 30 years over a period of 14 days. The snowball sampling method was used to recruit participants. STATA version 14.2 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of 724 participants, 203 (28%) reported that they did not have access to information and/or education concerning sexual and reproductive health (SRH). More than a quarter of the participants (26.9%, n = 195) reported that testing and treatment services of sexually transmitted infections were not available during the lockdown, and 27.2% could not obtain contraceptive supplies. Access to HIV/AIDS care services and menstrual supplies was also impaired. Lack of transportation was the commonest factor cited as limiting access to SRH services during the lockdown (68.7%), followed by the long distance from home to SRH facilities (55.2%), high cost of services (42.2%) and the curfew (39.1%). Sexually transmitted infections were the commonest SRH problems related to SRH during the lockdown (40.4%) followed by unwanted pregnancy (32.4%) and sexual abuse (32.4%). Marital, educational, and employment status were significantly correlated with the reported experiences of the participants. Conclusion: Access to SRH information and services for Ugandan youth was restricted during the COVID-19 lockdown and leaving them vulnerable to various SRH risks and adverse outcomes. Lack of transportation, long distances to health facilities, and high cost of services were important limiting factors. The Government and other stakeholders should incorporate SRH among the priority services to be preserved during future outbreaks.

2.
Infection and drug resistance ; 15:4595-4610, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1998900

ABSTRACT

Background During its first wave of COVID-19 infection in sub-Saharan Africa, there was insufficient understanding of the pandemic among frontline health workers. This study was carried out to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of frontline health workers (HWs) towards COVID-19 in Africa and their related factors. Methods This was a multicenter online cross-sectional study conducted between April 2020 and July 2020 using a Google survey link among frontline HWs involved in the COVID-19 response in 26 African countries. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to analyse the determinants of KAP. Data were analyzed using STATA ver 16;all tests were two-sided with 95% confidence interval. Results Five hundred and seventeen participated in this study from 26 African countries;289 (55.9%) were male and 228 (44.1%) female. Most of HWs, 379 (73.3%) showed poor knowledge about COVID-19 infection and preventive measures. In contrast, majority of them showed good attitude (89%) and practice (90.3%) towards prevention of COVID-19 infections. Knowledge varied among countries;Uganda had the greatest number of HWs with good knowledge (OR: 28.09, p<0.0001) followed by Ghana (OR=10.92, p=0.001) and DRC (OR: 4.59, p=0.015). The cadre of HWs also influenced knowledge;doctors were the most knowledgeable as compared to other cadres (OR: 3.4, p= 0.005). Attitude and practice were both influenced by HWs country of workplace and their cadre (p<0.05). Conclusion Majority of the frontline HWs in the African region had an overall good attitude and practice towards COVID-19 infection and practice measures despite relatively poor knowledge. The KAP is influenced by HWs country of workplace, their cadre. The knowledge of HWs in Africa should be increased to concourt with their attitude and practice to reduce the burden of intra-hospital transmission of the COVID-19.

3.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 16: 2247-2257, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997377

ABSTRACT

Background: Self-medication has become a serious public health problem posing great risks, especially with the increasing number of cases of COVID-19 disease globally and in Uganda. This may be partly because of the absence of a recognized treatment for the disease, however, the differing prevalence and nature from country to country may influence human behavioral responses. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the behavioral response to self-medication practices during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in comparison to the pre-COVID period in Western Uganda. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted from June to August 2020 in western Uganda using online Google forms and printed questionnaires to investigate the level of self-medication practice before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. This included 280 participants, aged 18 and above who consented to participate in the study. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling technique, and sampling was done by sending a structured online questionnaire via Google forms and printed questionnaires to participants who did not use the online Google forms. Results: Respondents that knew about self-medication were 97% of the 272 participants. Those that are aware of self-medication, have heard about it either through different avenues. Respondents who practiced self-medication before the COVID-19 pandemic were 239 (88%); those who practiced self-medication during the COVID-19 pandemic were 156 (57%); those that did not were 115 (43%). There was a statistically significant decrease in the number of respondents who practice self-medication during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown compared to the practice before the pandemic lockdown. p < 0.05 at 95% confidence interval (OR = 5.39, 95% CI = 3.48, 8.32). Conclusion: Our investigation showed adequate knowledge of self-medication and a high level of self-medication practice with a decrease in self-medication practices during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown compared to the practice before the lockdown.

4.
Heliyon ; 8(1): e08807, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650429

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of psychological distress (PD), and its associated demographic, psychosocial, hospital and health-related factors among hospital workers in Uganda during the COVID-19 related lockdown. METHODS: An online cross-sectional study was conducted among three hundred ninety six participants recruited from eight hospitals and PD was assessed using the Kessler 6 distress scale from May to June 2020. RESULTS: PD was present in 92.7% of the participants with majority (78.3%) having mild to moderate PD whereas 14.4% had severe PD. Severe PD had statistically significant association with having financial liabilities (O.R = 3.69 (1.55-8.77), p = 0.003). However, ability to maintain contact with family members and friends (O.R = 0.43 (0.22-0.84), p value = 0.013), and having enough personal protective equipment and safety tools at work place (O.R = 0.44 (0.23-0.84), p value = 0.012) were protective against severe PD. having excessive worry about getting infected with COVID-19, conflicts within a home, segregation by friends or community, longer working hours or involvement in management of suspected or confirmed case were not associated with severe PD. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate the need to take into consideration the mental wellbeing of health workers during this COVID-19 outbreak. Whereas hospital workers continue to provide their services during the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdown, it is important that they maintain contact with social support networks and be provided with counselling and mental health and psychosocial services in order to optimise their mental health during this pandemic.

5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 590458, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591317

ABSTRACT

Background: Low-income earners are particularly vulnerable to mental health, consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown restrictions, due to a temporary or permanent loss of income and livelihood, coupled with government-enforced measures of social distancing. This study evaluates the mental health status among low-income earners in southwestern Uganda during the first total COVID-19 lockdown in Uganda. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken amongst earners whose income falls below the poverty threshold. Two hundred and fifty-three (n = 253) male and female low-income earners between the ages of 18 and 60 years of age were recruited to the study. Modified generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-7), Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) tools as appropriate were used to assess anxiety, anger, and depression respectively among our respondents. Results: Severe anxiety (68.8%) followed by moderate depression (60.5%) and moderate anger (56.9%) were the most common mental health challenges experienced by low-income earners in Bushenyi district. Awareness of mental healthcare increased with the age of respondents in both males and females. A linear relationship was observed with age and depression (r = 0.154, P = 0.014) while positive correlations were observed between anxiety and anger (r = 0.254, P < 0.001); anxiety and depression (r = 0.153, P = 0.015) and anger and depression (r = 0.153, P = 0.015). Conclusion: The study shows the importance of mental health awareness in low resource settings during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Females were identified as persons at risk to mental depression, while anger was highest amongst young males.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anger , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , Uganda/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Front Public Health ; 9: 739270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572341

ABSTRACT

Objective: The study aimed to investigate the relationship between mental health with the level of education, relationship status, and awareness on mental health among low-income earners in Western Uganda. Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out among 253 participants. Anxiety, anger, and depression were assessed using a modified generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-7), Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, and Beck Depression Inventory item tools, respectively. Results: The majority of our respondents were male (n = 150/253, 59.3), had a secondary level of education (104/253, 41.1), and were single (137/253, 54.2). No formal education and primary education (r 2 = 47.4% and 6.4%, respectively) had a negative correlation with awareness of mental health care. In addition, no formal education had a positive correlation with anger and depression (r 2 = 1.9% and 0.3%, respectively). Singleness in this study had a negative correlation with awareness of mental health care, anger, and depression (r 2 = 1.9, 0.8, and 0.3%, respectively), and a positive correlation with anxiety (r 2 = 3.9%). Conclusion: It is evident that education and relationship status influenced awareness on mental health care and mental health state among low-income earners in Western Uganda during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Therefore, policymakers should strengthen social transformation through the proper engagement of low-income earners in this COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Uganda/epidemiology
7.
researchsquare; 2021.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-1164116.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: During its first wave of COVID-19 infection in sub-Saharan Africa, there was insufficient understanding of the pandemic among front-line health care professionals that has led to a misidentification, and mistreatment of affected patients, with a potential risk of contracting and spreading the disease. This study was carried out to determine the Knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of front-line health workers (HWs) towards COVID-19 in Africa and their related factors. Methods: : This was a multi-centers online cross-sectional study conducted over a 3-months study-period using a google survey link among front lines HWs involved in the COVID-19 response in 26 African countries. Chi-square test & logistic regression were used in the bivariate and multivariate analysis respectively to assess determinants of KAP. Statistical analysis was done using STATA version 16; all tests were two-sided with 95% confidence interval. Results: : Five hundred and seventeen (517, 96.3%) consented to participate in this study from 26 African countries; 289 (55.9%) were male and 228 (44.1%) female. Overall, most of HWs, 379 (73.3%) showed poor knowledge about COVID-19 infection and preventive measures. In contrast, majority of them showed good attitude (89%) and practice (90.3%) towards prevention of COVID-19 infections. Knowledge varied among countries; Uganda had the greatest number of HWs with good knowledge. (OR = 28.09, p <0.0001) followed by Ghana (OR=10.92, p=0.001) and DRC (OR: 4.59, p=0.015). The cadre of HWs also influenced knowledge; doctors were the most knowledgeable as compared to other cadres (OR: 3.4, p= 0.005). Additionally, knowledge increased with increasing HWs’ education level (p=0.011).Attitude and practice were both influenced by HWs country of workplace (p=0.05 & p< 0.0001 respectively) and their cadre (p = 0.025 & p < 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions: : Majority of the front-line HWs in the African region had an overall good attitude and practice towards COVID-19 infection and practice measures despite relatively poor Knowledge. The KAP is influenced by HWs country of workplace, their cadre and level of education.

8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 831, 2021 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362055

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess health facilities' readiness to provide safe surgical care during Ebola and COVID-19 era in Uganda and in the Eastern DR Congo. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in selected national, regional referral and general hospital facilities in Uganda and in the eastern part of DR Congo from 1st August 2020 to 30th October 2020. Data was analysed using Stata version 15. RESULTS: The participation rate was of 37.5 % (72/192) for both countries. None of the hospitals fulfilled the readiness criteria for safe surgical care provision in both countries. The mean bed capacity of participating health facilities (HF) was 184 in Eastern DR Congo and 274 in Uganda with an average surgical ward bed capacity of 22.3 % (41/184) and 20.4 % (56/274) respectively. The mean number of operating rooms was 2 and 3 in Eastern DR Congo and Uganda respectively. Nine hospitals (12.5 %) reported being able to test for Ebola and 25 (34.7 %) being able to test for COVID-19. Postponing of elective surgeries was reported by 10 (13.9) participating hospitals. Only 7 (9.7 %) hospitals reported having a specific operating room for suspect or confirmed cases of Ebola or COVID-19. Appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) was reported to be available in 60 (83.3 %) hospitals. Most of the staff had appropriate training on donning and doffing of PPE 40 (55.6 %). Specific teams and protocols for safe surgical care provision were reported to be present in 61 (84.7 %) and 56 (77.8 %) respectively in Uganda and Eastern DR Congo participating hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of readiness to provide safe surgical care during Ebola and COVID-19 era across the participating hospitals in both countries indicate a need for strategies to enhance health facility supplies and readiness for safe surgical provision in resource-limited settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Cross-Sectional Studies , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Health Facilities , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Uganda/epidemiology
9.
researchsquare; 2021.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-386995.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: During its first wave in sub-Saharan Africa, there was insufficient understanding of the new pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among frontline health care professionals that has led to a misidentification, and mistreatment of affected patients, with a potential risks of contacting and spreading the disease. This study was carried out to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of frontline health care givers (HCGs) towards COVID-19 in Africa and their related factors.Methods: This was a multi-centers online cross-sectional study conducted over a 3-months study-period using a google survey link among front lines African HCGs in the COVID-19 response units within 28 African countries. Bivariate and Multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the associations between co-variates. Statistical significance was set at p≤ 0.05 and 95% confidence interval. Results: There a total of 518 out of 588 approached HCGs participated in the study from 28 African countries. Overall, 496 (96%) had bad practice score, and 405 (78%) had positive attitude regarding COVID-19. The related factors of KAP towards COVID-19 identified were the lack of self- esteem and self-confidence in the management of COVID-19 (aOR: - 0.17, 95% CI=-0.766 to -4.33, p >0.05), Ignorance (aOR: 1.55, 95% CI=1.003 to 2.402, p <0.048), lack of knowledge updates on COVID-19 (aOR: 1.81, 95% CI=1.105 to 2.951, p <0.018).Conclusions: Majority of the frontline HCG has an overall good knowledge and attitude towards the disease across the African continents regardless of their level of study. However, the KAP is influenced negatively by the lack of self-esteem, self- confidence, ignorance, and insufficiency of frequent update of COVID-19 information. Promoting psychological support in addition to regular trainings could help to enhance the KAP of frontline HCG in African region.

10.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world is grappling with an ever-changing COVID-19 pandemic using preventive measures such as personal hygiene, face masks, restrictions on travel and gatherings in communities, in addition to a race to find a vaccine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the western Uganda community on the proper use of face masks to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire was carried out from 1st July to 10th July 2020 among western Ugandans of consent age of 18 years and above. Data was analysed using Stata version 14.2. RESULTS: Among the respondents (n = 1114), the mean age was 30.7 (SD 11.1), 51% were males, 53.9% married and 43% had attained secondary education. Most participants (60.1%, n = 670) had satisfactory knowledge on the use of face masks and participants at a tertiary education level [AOR 2.6 (95% CI: 1.42-4.67; p = 0.002)] were likely to have satisfactory knowledge than participants who had not education. On attitude, most respondents (69.4%) were confident enough to correctly put on a face mask; 83.4% believed that a face mask can protect against COVID-19 and 75.9% of respondents had never shared their face mask. The majority of respondents (95.2%) agreed wearing face masks in public places was important to protect themselves against COVID-19; 60.3% reported washing their hands before wearing and after removing the face mask. Unfortunately, 51.5% reported removing the face mask if they needed to talk to someone. CONCLUSION: Despite the satisfactory knowledge, good attitude and practices, there is still much more to be done in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices among participants. Government, non-governmental organizations and civil society should improve sensitization of populations on how to behave with face masks while talking to avoid the spread of the COVID-19 among western Ugandans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Masks/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Masks/virology , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uganda/epidemiology
11.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(3)2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143623

ABSTRACT

Background-misinformation and mistrust often undermines community vaccine uptake, yet information in rural communities, especially of developing countries, is scarce. This study aimed to identify major challenges associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine clinical trials among healthcare workers and staff in Uganda. Methods-a rapid exploratory survey was conducted over 5 weeks among 260 respondents (66% male) from healthcare centers across the country using an online questionnaire. Twenty-seven questions assessed knowledge, confidence, and trust scores on COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials from participants in 46 districts in Uganda. Results-we found low levels of knowledge (i.e., confusing COVID-19 with Ebola) with males being more informed than females (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 0.7-3.0), and mistrust associated with policy decisions to promote herbal treatments in Uganda and the rushed international clinical trials, highlighting challenges for the upcoming Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccinations. Knowledge, confidence and trust scores were higher among the least educated (certificate vs. bachelor degree holders). We also found a high level of skepticism and possible community resistance to DNA recombinant vaccines, such as the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Preference for herbal treatments (38/260; 14.6%, 95% CI: 10.7-19.3) currently being promoted by the Ugandan government raises major policy concerns. High fear and mistrust for COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials was more common among wealthier participants and more affluent regions of the country. Conclusion-our study found that knowledge, confidence, and trust in COVID-19 vaccines was low among healthcare workers in Uganda, especially those with higher wealth and educational status. There is a need to increase transparency and inclusive participation to address these issues before new trials of COVID-19 vaccines are initiated.

12.
Front Public Health ; 8: 618731, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067678

ABSTRACT

Background: The world is facing the Coronavirus pandemic, which is highly infectious. Several measures have been put in place to prevent its spread among the population. However, for these preventive measures to be effective, the population requires appropriate and sufficient knowledge, attitude, and practices. Thus, a survey to assess knowledge, attitude, and self-reported practice toward measures for prevention of the spread of COVID-19 was conducted among Ugandans. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among during the lockdown in Uganda. An online structured questionnaire was used, applying a snowballing sampling approach for recruitment of participants 18 years and above and residing in Uganda. Data collection was done from 6th to 15th April 2020, during which 1,763 people participated. We analyzed all data using STATA 14.2, applying appropriate statistical tests. Results: Out of 1,763 participants, 80% were highly knowledgeable. For attitude, 72.4% reported following recommendations given by the Ministry of health to prevent the spread of COVID-19; 89.0% were worried about contracting COVID-19 and 73.3% agreed that COVID-19 can be cured and 99.3% reported good practice toward measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. According to ordered logistic regression, health workers were 6 times more knowledgeable [aOR:6 (3.51-10.09), p < 0.001] followed by teachers [aOR:5.2 (2.6-10.32), p < 0.001]; students [aOR:3.2 (1.96-5.33), p < 0.001]. On the contrary, the drivers, business entrepreneurs, and security personnel had less knowledge. Conclusion: The results show that the participating Ugandans were knowledgeable and had a positive attitude and good practices. However, there is still a gap in knowledge among drivers, business entrepreneurs, and security personnel. Therefore, there is a need to mobilize the country's population to have the same degree of knowledge, which will have an impact on the attitude and practices toward prevention of the spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Internet , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Education , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uganda
13.
Front Public Health ; 8: 416, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732824

ABSTRACT

Background: Transmission of COVID-19 in developing countries is expected to surpass that in developed countries; however, information on community perceptions of this new disease is scarce. The aim of the study was to identify possible misconceptions among males and females toward COVID-19 in Uganda using a rapid online survey distributed via social media. Methods: A cross-sectional survey carried out in early April 2020 was conducted with 161 Ugandans, who purposively participated in the online questionnaire that assessed understandings of COVID-19 risk and infection. Sixty-four percent of respondents were male and 36% were female. Results: We found significant divergences of opinion on gendered susceptibility to COVID-19. Most female respondents considered infection risk, symptoms, severe signs, and death to be equally distributed between genders. In contrast, male respondents believed they were more at risk of infection, severe symptoms, severe signs, and death (52.7 vs. 30.6%, RR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.14-2.8). Most women did not share this perception and disagreed that males were at higher risk of infection (by a factor of three), symptoms (79% disagree), severe signs (71%, disagree), and death (70.2% disagree). Overall, most respondents considered children less vulnerable (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.55-2.2) to COVID-19 than adults, that children present with less symptoms (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 0.77-3.19), and that there would be less mortality in children (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.41-1.88). Of female respondents, 76.4% considered mortality from COVID-19 to be different between the young and the elderly (RR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.01-2.92) and 92.7% believed young adults would show fewer signs than the elderly, and 71.4% agreed that elderly COVID-19 patients would show more severe signs than the young (OR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 4.8). While respondents considered that all races were susceptible to the signs and symptoms of infection as well as death from COVID-19, they considered mortality would be highest among white people from Europe and the USA. Some respondents (mostly male 33/102, 32.4%) considered COVID-19 to be a "disease of whites" (30.2%). Conclusion: The WHO has identified women and children in rural communities as vulnerable persons who should be given more attention in the COVID-19 national response programs across Africa; however, our study has found that men in Uganda perceive themselves to be at greater risk and that these contradictory perceptions (including the association of COVID-19 with "the white" race) suggest an important discrepancy in the communication of who is most vulnerable and why. Further research is urgently needed to validate and expand the results of this small exploratory study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Risk Assessment , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uganda/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Health Serv Insights ; 13: 1178632920944167, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711561

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization has placed a lot of attention on vulnerable communities of Africa due to their chronically weak health care systems. Recent findings from Uganda show that medical staff members have sufficient knowledge but poor attitudes toward coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes, and preparedness/practices of lecturers and students in the fight against COVID-19. METHOD: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study of 103 lecturers and students both men and women of age group 18 to 69 years in western Uganda. Data were obtained through a pretested questionnaire availed online. RESULTS: Knowledge on COVID-19 symptoms was highest in this order: fever > dry cough > difficulty breathing > fatigue > headache with no significant differences between lecturers and students. Knowledge of participants on transmission of COVID-19 was highest in the order of cough drops > contaminated surfaces > person-to-person contact > asymptomatic persons > airborne > zoonotic with no significant differences among lecturers and students. Lecturers and students were all willing to continue using personal protective equipment like masks, and personal practices such as covering the mouth while sneezing and coughing, no handshaking, and washing of hands with no significant differences in the responses. The positive attitudes that COVID-19 could kill, anyone can get COVID-19, and willing to abide by the set regulations against the pandemic showed personal concerns and desired efforts against COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The study identifies lecturers and students as potential stakeholders in the fight against community transmission of COVID-19.

15.
Front Public Health ; 8: 340, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691210

ABSTRACT

Background: Market vendors occupy a strategic position in the fight against the spread of SARS CoV-2 in rural Uganda. To successfully contain the spread of the virus, special attention needs to be given to this set of people by assessing the type of information, source of information, and practices they inculcate as regards adherence to WHO guidelines in the fight against COVID-19 in Uganda. The study aimed to assess the role of information sources, education level, and phone internet connectivity in influencing COVID-19 knowledge among the rural market vendors; and the relationship existing between knowledge, attitude, and practices among them. Methods: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study among rural market vendors (n = 248) in southwestern Uganda. Information was collected using a questionnaire and descriptively presented as frequency and percentages. Results: The study showed that the majority of the rural market vendors had sufficient information regarding COVID-19 with the majority being female individuals and have attained a secondary level of education, The general percentage score for knowledge, attitude, and practices were (75.57, 82.6, and 76.50% respectively). There was a positive correlation between attitude and practices (r = 0.17, p = 0.007), as well as their knowledge with practices (r = 0.29, p < 0.001). The majority of the people in the population did not have their phones connected to the internet (OR = 1.96, 95%CI: 1.16-3.31, P = 0.01). The majority of people received their information regarding COVID-19 from one source (radio) (OR = 1.55). Conclusion: Where and how the rural market vendors get their information and education level are vital in breaking COVID 19 infection circle in line with WHO guidelines. Therefore, sources of information and education level played a key role in molding their knowledge and practices. However, the level of knowledge on COVID 19 among our respondents was not linked with phone internet connectivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Commerce , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Uganda , World Health Organization , Young Adult
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