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1.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 119(31-32): 544-545, 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117641
2.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 12(10)2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-term health consequences following COVID-19 disease constitute an increasing problem worldwide. A considerable number of patients still suffer from various symptoms, most commonly dyspnea, months or even years after the acute infection. In these patients, a classical pulmonary function test often yields no significant findings. Subsequently, treating those patients is a challenge for any physician as there are currently no evidence-based treatment plans. CASE AND METHODS: We reported the case of a 58-year-old patient who was still suffering from resting dyspnea six months after severe COVID-19 pneumonia. The dyspnea was so pronounced that the patient was supplied with home oxygen, which they used as needed. The regional distribution of ventilation in the lungs was studied twice utilizing noninvasive electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The first examination showed distinct inhomogeneities of regional ventilation, a regional ventilation delay (RVD) of 15%, and pronounced pendelluft phenomena. Seven weeks after treatment with budesonide and physical therapy, the patient reported a clear subjective improvement in complaints. Accordingly, the regional distribution of ventilation also improved. CONCLUSION: Electrical impedance tomography might be a promising method to assess lung function in post-COVID patients; however, controlled and larger studies are necessary.

3.
Trials ; 23(1): 737, 2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the intense global research endeavour to improve the treatment of patients with COVID-19, the current therapy remains insufficient, resulting in persisting high mortality. Severe cases are characterised by a systemic inflammatory reaction driven by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and tumour-necrosis-factor alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α-blocking therapies have proved beneficial in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and could therefore pose a new treatment option in COVID-19. Hitherto, no results from randomised controlled trials assessing the effectiveness and safety of infliximab-a monoclonal antibody targeting TNF-α-in the treatment of COVID-19 have been published. METHODS: In this phase-2 clinical trial, patients with COVID-19 and clinical and laboratory signs of hyperinflammation will be randomised to receive either one dose of infliximab (5 mg/kg body weight) in addition to the standard of care or the standard of care alone. The primary endpoint is the difference in 28-day mortality. Further assessments concern the safety of infliximab therapy in COVID-19 and the influence of infliximab on morbidity and the course of the disease. For the supplementary scientific programme, blood and urine samples are collected to assess concomitant molecular changes. The Ethics Committee of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (2021-2236-AMG-ff) and the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute (4513/01) approved the study. DISCUSSION: The results of this study could influence the therapy of patients with COVID-19 and affect the course of the disease worldwide, as infliximab is globally available and approved by several international drug agencies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT04922827 , 11 June 2021) and at EudraCT ( 2021-002098-25 , 19 May 2021).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Humans , Infliximab/adverse effects , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
4.
Psychiatry Res ; 317: 114836, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008050

ABSTRACT

Neuropsychiatric symptoms are the most common sequelae of long-COVID. As accumulating evidence suggests an impact of survived SARS-CoV-2-infection on brain physiology, it is necessary to further investigate brain structural changes in relation to course and neuropsychiatric symptom burden in long-COVID. To this end, the present study investigated 3T-MRI scans from long-COVID patients suffering from neuropsychiatric symptoms (n = 30), and healthy controls (n = 20). Whole-brain comparison of gray matter volume (GMV) was conducted by voxel-based morphometry. To determine whether changes in GMV are predicted by neuropsychiatric symptom burden and/or initial severity of symptoms of COVID-19 and time since onset of COVID-19 stepwise linear regression analysis was performed. Significantly enlarged GMV in long-COVID patients was present in several clusters (spanning fronto-temporal areas, insula, hippocampus, amygdala, basal ganglia, and thalamus in both hemispheres) when compared to controls. Time since onset of COVID-19 was a significant regressor in four of these clusters with an inverse relationship. No associations with clinical symptom burden were found. GMV alterations in limbic and secondary olfactory areas are present in long-COVID patients and might be dynamic over time. Larger samples and longitudinal data in long-COVID patients are required to further clarify the mediating mechanisms between COVID-19, GMV and neuropsychiatric symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gray Matter , Humans , Gray Matter/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
6.
Inn Med (Heidelb) ; 63(10): 1036-1042, 2022 Oct.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007121

ABSTRACT

Fecal microbiome transfer (FMT) involving the transfer of the microbiome of healthy stool donors to patients with various diseases has been performed in Germany in clinical studies and individual treatment attempts. There is no doubt that FMT is an effective therapeutic principle for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and ulcerative colitis. From a medico-legal point of view, it should be stressed that, in Germany, the microbiome to be transferred is regarded as a drug, the manufacture of which is subject to the Medicines Act and the risk information from the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. The background of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic and the potential risk of transmitting pathogens must also be considered. There is an obligation to notify the competent state authorities to perform FMTs in the context of individual treatment attempts. In the context of the limited availability and the fundamental problem of infection, future studies aim to identify the therapeutically active components in the microbiome. Recombinant production is the aim. Initial results represent preliminary steps, as these concepts are not yet established in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clostridioides difficile , Clostridium Infections , Clostridium Infections/therapy , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Infection ; 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956021

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Some patients experience long-term sequelae after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, despite a present post-COVID condition, defined as "any symptom lasting longer than 12 weeks," only a subset of patients search for medical help and therapy. METHOD: We invited all adults with a positive real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for SARS-CoV-2 between March 2020 and September 2021 (n = 4091) in the city of Jena to answer a standardized questionnaire including demographic information, the course of the acute infection and current health status. K-means-clustering of quality of life (QoL) was used to explore post-COVID subgroups. RESULTS: A total of 909 participants at a median interval of 367 (IQR 291/403) days after acute infection were included in the analysis. Of those, 643 (70.7%) complained of having experienced persistent symptoms at the time of the survey. Cluster analysis based on QoL revealed two subgroups of people with persistent post-COVID symptoms. Whereas 189/643 participants (29.4%) showed markedly diminished QoL, normal QoL was detected in 454/643 individuals (70.6%). CONCLUSION: Despite persistent symptoms being reported by nearly three quarters of participants, only one-third of these described a significant reduction in QoL (cluster 1), whereas the other two-thirds reported a near-normal QoL (cluster 2), thus indicating a differentiation between "post-COVID disease" and "post-COVID condition". The prevalence of clinically relevant post-COVID disease was at least 20.7%. Health policies should focus on this subset.

8.
Infection ; 2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1930598

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Post-COVID syndrome is increasingly recognized as a new clinical entity after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Patients living in rural areas may have to travel long with subjectively great effort to be examined using all necessary interdisciplinary tools. This problem could be addressed with mobile outpatient clinics. METHODS: In this prospective observational study, we investigated physical fitness, fatigue, depression, cognitive dysfunction, and dyspnea in patients with post-COVID syndrome in a mobile interdisciplinary post-COVID outpatient clinic. Upon referral from their primary care physician, patients were offered an appointment at a mobile post-COVID outpatient clinic close to their home. RESULTS: We studied 125 patients (female, n = 79; 63.2%) in our mobile unit. All patients reported symptoms lasting for more than 12 weeks after acute infection. 88.3% and 64.1% of patients reported significant impairment in physical and mental quality of life. Patients reported a median of three symptoms. The most frequently reported symptoms were fatigue (86.4%), cognitive dysfunction (85.6%), and dyspnea (37.6%). 56.0% of patients performed at < 2.5th percentile at the 1 min sit-to-stand test compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and 25 patients (20.0%) exhibited a drop in oxygen saturation. A questionnaire given to each patient regarding the mobile unit revealed a very high level of patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing need for high-quality and locally available care for patients with post-COVID syndrome. A mobile post-COVID outpatient clinic is a new concept that may be particularly suitable for use in rural regions. Patients' satisfaction following visits in such units is very high.

10.
United European Gastroenterol J ; 10(4): 409-424, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813612

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: International registries have reported high mortality rates in patients with liver disease and COVID-19. However, the extent to which comorbidities contribute to excess COVID-19 mortality in cirrhosis is controversial. METHODS: We used the multinational Lean European Open Survey on SARS-CoV-2-infected patients (LEOSS) to identify patients with cirrhosis documented between March 2020 and March 2021, when the wild-type and alpha variant were predominant. We compared symptoms, disease progression and mortality after propensity score matching (PSM) for age, sex, obesity, smoking status, and concomitant diseases. Mortality was also compared with that of patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) without SARS-CoV-2 infection, a common bacterial infection and well-described precipitator of acute-on-chronic liver failure. RESULTS: Among 7096 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection eligible for analysis, 70 (0.99%) had cirrhosis, and all were hospitalized. Risk factors for severe COVID-19, such as diabetes, renal disease, and cardiovascular disease were more frequent in patients with cirrhosis. Case fatality rate in patients with cirrhosis was 31.4% with the highest odds of death in patients older than 65 years (43.6% mortality; odds ratio [OR] 4.02; p = 0.018), Child-Pugh class C (57.1%; OR 4.00; p = 0.026), and failure of two or more organs (81.8%; OR 19.93; p = 0.001). After PSM for demographics and comorbidity, the COVID-19 case fatality of patients with cirrhosis did not significantly differ from that of matched patients without cirrhosis (28.8% vs. 26.1%; p = 0.644) and was similar to the 28-day mortality in a comparison group of patients with cirrhosis and SBP (33.3% vs. 31.5%; p = 1.000). CONCLUSIONS: In immunologically naïve patients with cirrhosis, mortality from wild-type SARS-CoV-2 and the alpha variant is high and is largely determined by cirrhosis-associated comorbidities and extrahepatic organ failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Registries
11.
Z Gastroenterol ; 2022 Feb 11.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713252

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly affecting the lives of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Those affected and their relatives have numerous questions about the risk of the disease, the course of a possible SARS-CoV-2 infection or the influence of CED-specific therapy on these. Many IBD patients also have additional questions about the safety and effectiveness of a vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest findings on COVID-19 and IBD, but also to discuss vaccine response (humoral/cellular), the influence of ongoing therapy on the vaccine response as well as the frequency of side effects and the importance of booster immunizations and to create an evidence-based basis for discussion with patients.

12.
Z Gastroenterol ; 60(1): 77-80, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 is a promising strategy to protect immunocompromised IBD patients from a severe course of COVID-19. As these patients were excluded from initial clinical vaccination trials, patients frequently express concerns regarding the safety of these vaccines, especially whether vaccination might trigger IBD flares ("hit-and-run-hypothesis"). METHODS: In order to assess the risk of an IBD flare after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, an anonymous survey was performed at five German IBD centers and one patient organization (Deutsche Morbus Crohn/Colitis ulcerosa Vereinigung (DCCV) e.V.) in August and October 2021. RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 914 patients, 781 of whom reported a previous vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 (85.4%). Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 was not associated with an increased risk of IBD flares (p=0.319) or unscheduled visits to the IBD physician (p=0.848). Furthermore, typical symptoms of an IBD flare including abdominal pain, increases in stool frequency, or rectal bleeding were not influenced by the vaccination. CONCLUSION: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 is safe in IBD patients. These results may help to reduce fears regarding the vaccination in IBD patients. Our results can help to reduce fears in IBD patients regarding the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. A close communication between patients and physicians before and after the vaccination may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
13.
Infection ; 50(3): 661-669, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611526

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sequelae of COVID-19 can be severe and longlasting. We compared frequencies of fatigue, depression and cognitive dysfunction in survivors of SARS-CoV-2-infection and sepsis. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study of 355 symptomatic post-COVID patients who visited our out-patient clinic for post-COVID-19 care. We compared them with 272 symptomatic patients from the Mid-German Sepsis Cohort, which investigates the long-term courses of sepsis survivors. Possible predictors for frequent clinical findings (fatigue, signs of depression, cognitive dysfunction) in post-COVID were investigated with multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Median age of the post-COVID patients was 51 years (range 17-86), 60.0% were female, and 31.8% required hospitalization during acute COVID-19. In the post-COVID patients (median follow-up time: 163 days) and the post-sepsis patients (180 days), fatigue was found in 93.2% and 67.8%, signs of depression were found in 81.3% and 10.9%, and cognitive dysfunction was found in 23.5% and 21.3%, respectively. In post-COVID, we did not observe an association between fatigue or depression and the severity of acute COVID-19. In contrast, cognitive dysfunction was associated with hospitalization (out-patient versus in-patient) and more frequent in post-COVID patients treated on an ICU compared to the MSC patients. CONCLUSION: In post-COVID patients, fatigue and signs of depression are more common than in sepsis survivors, independent from the acute SARS-CoV-2-infection. In contrast, cognitive dysfunction is associated with hospitalization. Despite the differences in frequencies, owing to the similarity of post-COVID and post-sepsis sequelae, this knowledge may help in implementing follow-up approaches after SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Sepsis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Disease Progression , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Z Gastroenterol ; 59(11): 1189-1196, 2021 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506904

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The influence of a SARS-CoV-2 infection on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been well characterized and it is unclear whether this requires an adaptation of the immunosuppressive therapy. METHODS: A national register was established for the retrospective documentation of clinical parameters and changes in immunosuppressive therapy in SARS-CoV-2 infected IBD patients. RESULTS: In total, only 3 of 185 IBD patients (1.6 %) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection because of abdominal symptoms. In the course of COVID-19 disease, 43.5 % developed diarrhea, abdominal pain or hematochezia (risk of hospitalization with vs. without abdominal symptoms: 20.0 % vs. 10.6 %, p < 0.01). With active IBD at the time of SARS-CoV-2 detection, there was an increased risk of hospitalization (remission 11.2 %, active IBD 23.3 % p < 0.05). IBD-specific therapy remained unchanged in 115 patients (71.4 %); the most common change was an interruption of systemic therapy (16.2 %). DISCUSSION: New abdominal symptoms often appeared in SARS-CoV-2 infected IBD patients. However, these only rarely led to SARS-CoV-2 testing. A high IBD activity at the time of SARS-CoV-2 detection was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies
15.
Z Gastroenterol ; 59(12): 1288-1296, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475527

ABSTRACT

Guidelines recommend vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 in transplant recipients, candidates, and their household contacts. However, little is known about the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines in these groups.In March 2021, we surveyed 826 liver transplant recipients, candidates, and their household contacts to determine acceptance rates and factors influencing the acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine; 341 patients (40%) and 237 household contacts (28%) returned the questionnaire. Ninety percent of patients returning the survey reported they were willing to receive the vaccine within the next 6 months or had already started vaccination. Only 2% of patients and 4% of household contacts reported refusing the vaccine, and 8% of patients and 9% of household contacts wanted to postpone vaccination because of concerns about side effects. Having received the influenza vaccine in the last 2 seasons was the strongest indicator of acceptance to receive the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine within 6 months (odds ratio 5.11; 95% confidence interval 2.43-10.74; p < 0.001). Thirty-two percent of responding patients reported fear of side effects as a reason for having refused vaccination before.Although the acceptance of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine was particularly high among German liver transplant recipients, candidates, and household contacts in this survey, transplant physicians are encouraged to discuss safety concerns with patients who have refused the seasonal influenza vaccine in the past.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Liver Transplantation , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients , Vaccination
17.
Pneumologie ; 75(11): 869-900, 2021 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392935

ABSTRACT

The German Society of Pneumology initiated the AWMFS1 guideline Post-COVID/Long-COVID. In a broad interdisciplinary approach, this S1 guideline was designed based on the current state of knowledge.The clinical recommendation describes current post-COVID/long-COVID symptoms, diagnostic approaches, and therapies.In addition to the general and consensus introduction, a subject-specific approach was taken to summarize the current state of knowledge.The guideline has an expilcit practical claim and will be continuously developed and adapted by the author team based on the current increase in knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Medicine , COVID-19/complications , Consensus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
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