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1.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 104(13): e56, 2022 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite known surgical volume reductions in 2020 during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, no study has fully quantified the impact of the pandemic on the number of elective inpatient total hip (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) cases. The purpose of the present study was to analyze THA and TKA case volumes in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The Premier Healthcare Database was utilized to identify adults undergoing primary elective THA or TKA from January 2017 to December 2020. The National Inpatient Sample was cross-referenced to provide nationwide representative sampling weights. Patients undergoing revision total joint arthroplasty (TJA) or non-elective surgery were excluded. Two quantitative models were created from both databases to estimate TJA case volume in 2020. Descriptive statistics were utilized to report monthly changes in elective TJA utilization throughout 2020. Univariate analyses were performed to compare differences between subgroups. RESULTS: From 2017 to 2019, it was estimated that 1,006,000 elective inpatient TJAs (64.2% TKA and 35.8% THA) were performed annually. In 2020, an estimated 526,000 to 538,000 cases (62.0% TKA and 38.0% THA) were performed, representing a 46.5% to 47.7% decrease in nationwide volume from the prior 3-year average. Moreover, the elective TJA case volume for April 2020 was 1.9% of the average for that month from 2017 through 2019. Subsequently, case volumes for May and June increased compared with the volumes for those months from 2017 through 2019. There was then a decrease in cases for July, corresponding with the "second wave" of COVID-19, followed by an additional steady monthly decline through December, corresponding with the "third wave." Finally, the elective TJA cases for December 2020 represented only 41.0% of the average case volume for that month from 2017 through 2019. CONCLUSIONS: In the midst of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, approximately 526,000 to 538,000 elective inpatient TJA cases were performed, representing a 46.5% to 47.7% decrease compared with the 3 previous years. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic persisted through the end of that year, with decreased case volume through December 2020.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Inpatients , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
2.
Arthroplast Today ; 7: 268-272, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, elective total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) were suspended across the United States in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We had previously published the results of a survey to the affected patients from 6 institutions. We now present the results of a larger distribution of this survey, through May and June 2020, to electively scheduled patients representing different regions of the United States. METHODS: Fifteen centers identified through the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Research Committee participated in a survey study of THA and TKA patients. Patients scheduled for primary elective THA or TKA but canceled due to the COVID-19 elective surgery stoppage (3/2020-5/2020) were included in the study. Descriptive statistics along with subgroup analysis with Wilcoxon rank were performed. RESULTS: In total, surveys were distributed to 2135 patients and completed by 848 patients (40%) from 15 institutions. Most patients (728/848, 86%) had their surgery postponed or canceled by the surgeon or hospital. Unknown length of surgical delay remained the highest source of anxiety among survey participants. Male patients were more likely to be willing to proceed with surgery in spite of COVID-19. There were minimal regional differences in responses. Only 61 patients (7%) stated they will continue to delay surgery for fear of contracting COVID-19 while in the hospital. CONCLUSION: Similar to the previous study, the most anxiety-provoking thought was the uncertainty, over if and when the canceled joint replacement surgery could be rescheduled. Patients suffering from the daily pain of hip and knee arthritis who have been scheduled for elective arthroplasty remain eager to have their operation as soon as elective surgery is allowed to resume.

3.
Arthroplast Today ; 7: 209-215, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a severe impact on the practices of adult reconstruction surgeons, primarily due to the elective nature of hip and knee arthroplasty. METHODS: To capture the impact of COVID-19 on its members, the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons sent 6 surveys over a span of 7 months from late March until September of 2020 querying its members regarding the effects of COVID on the health and well-being of their personal, financial, and clinical practice. RESULTS: Ninety-two percent of surgeons reported a cessation of elective inpatient cases during the height of the crisis. The reduction was greatest for surgeries performed in hospital-based sites of care. Ninety-one percent reported a drop in clinic volume. At the final surveys, these numbers where 7% and 59%, respectively. In addition, there was a widespread increase in the use of telemedicine during this period. Only a small number of orthopedic practices permanently closed because of COVID-19; 68% of surgeons, however, sought federal funding to offset their loss of revenue because of the restrictions placed on elective surgeries. Finally, once elective surgeries were reinstated, most surgeons reported no restrictions with surgical cases and that they believed they were adapting to the challenges of COVID successfully. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of COVID-19 in 2020 on the practice of arthroplasty resulted in nearly universal loss of volume and significant financial stress. Recovery has been consistent but incomplete for most practices. Continued monitoring of the members of American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons will be needed in 2021 to measure the strength of the demonstrated adaptive recovery of 2020.

4.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7S): S89-S94, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-243543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses an important risk to global health. METHODS: This study surveyed 370 international orthopedic surgeons affiliated with the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons to help identify the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient care. RESULTS: A total of 99 surgeons (27% of those surveyed) completed the questionnaire representing 32 different countries. Except for surgeons in Japan, all respondents noted that their practice had been affected to some degree and 70% of the surgeons have canceled elective procedures. More than a third of the surgeons have had to close their practices altogether and the remaining open practices were estimated to be sustainable for 7 weeks on average given their current situation. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in marked changes to the majority of international arthroplasty practices.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Orthopedic Surgeons , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7S): S60-S64, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-143287

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic has upended nearly every medical discipline, dramatically impacted patient care and has had far-reaching effects on surgeon education. In many areas of the country, elective orthopedic surgery has completely stopped to ensure that resources are available for the critically ill and to minimize the spread of disease. COVID-19 is forcing many around the world to re-evaluate existing processes and organizations and adapt to carry out business, of which medicine and education are not immune. Most national and international orthopedic conferences, training programs, and workshops have been postponed or canceled, and we are now critically evaluating the delivery of education to our colleagues as well as residents and fellows. This article describes the evolution of orthopedic education and significant paradigm shifts necessary to continue to teach ourselves and the future leaders of our noble profession.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload
6.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7S): S49-S55, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-102140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals in the United States were recommended to stop performing elective procedures. This stoppage has led to the cancellation of a large number of hip and knee arthroplasties. The effect of this on patients' physical mental and economic health is unknown. METHODS: A survey was developed by the AAHKS Research Committee to assess pain, anxiety, physical function, and economic ability of patients to undergo a delayed operation. Six institutions conducted the survey to 360 patients who had to have elective hip and knee arthroplasty cancelled between March and July of 2020. RESULTS: Patients were most anxious about the uncertainty of when their operation could be rescheduled. Although 85% of patients understood and agreed with the public health measures to curb infections, almost 90% of patients plan to reschedule as soon as possible. Age and geographic region of the patients affected their anxiety. Younger patients were more likely to have financial concerns and concerns about job security. Patients in the Northeast were more concerned about catching COVID-19 during a future hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Patients suffering from the pain of hip and knee arthritis continue to struggle with pain from their end-stage disease. They have anxiety about the COVID-19 pandemic. Few patients feel they will be limited financially and 90% want to have surgery as soon as possible. Age and physical location of the patients affect their causes for anxiety around their future surgery.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
7.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7S): S10-S14, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-97471

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created widespread changes across all of health care. As a result, the impacts on the delivery of orthopedic services have been challenged. To ensure and provide adequate health care resources in terms of hospital capacity and personnel and personal protective equipment, service lines such as adult reconstruction and lower limb arthroplasty have stopped or substantially limited elective surgeries and have been forced to re-engineer care processes for a high volume of patients. Herein, we summarize the similar approaches by two arthroplasty divisions in high-volume academic referral centers in (1) the cessation of elective surgeries, (2) workforce restructuring, (3) phased delivery of outpatient and inpatient care, and (4) educational restructuring.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
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