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1.
JTCVS open ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1870883

ABSTRACT

Objectives The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacted cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, with changes in clinical, academic, and personal responsibilities. We hypothesized that the pandemic may disproportionately impact female academic CT surgeons, accentuating preexisting sex disparities. This study assessed sex differences in authorship of 2 major CT surgery journals during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods All accepted submissions to The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery between April and August of 2019 and the same period in 2020 were reviewed. Article type and author characteristics were obtained from the journals. Author sex was predicted using a validated multinational database (Genderize.io) and verified with authors' institutional and public professional profiles. Results In total, 1106 submissions were accepted during the 2019 period, whereas 900 articles (18.6% decrease) were accepted during the same period in 2020. Original research articles comprised 33.3% of the 2019 articles but only 4.9% of the 2020 articles. Female authors contributed to 39.3% (23.1% original research and 16.2% nonoriginal articles) and 29.4% (3.3% original research and 26.1% nonoriginal articles) of articles during the 2019 and 2020 periods, respectively. This represents a marked change in the type of articles that female authors contributed to. Conclusions Early on during the COVID-19 pandemic, the type of articles accepted, and authorship demographic changed. There was a decrease in contribution of female-authored CT surgery articles submitted to both journals, especially for original research. Future research will elucidate the long-term impact of the pandemic on sex disparities in academic productivity. Video Graphical Sex differences in authorship of the 2 highest-impact CT surgery journals. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic (April to August of 2020), there was a change in the type of articles accepted and the authorship demographic, relative to the same period in 2019. Original research articles accepted to CT surgery journals declined whereas nonoriginal articles increased. Female authors contributed more to nonoriginal articles and less to original articles during the pandemic.

2.
JTCVS Open ; 2022 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852248

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacted cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, with changes in clinical, academic, and personal responsibilities. We hypothesized that the pandemic may disproportionately impact female academic CT surgeons, accentuating preexisting sex disparities. This study assessed sex differences in authorship of 2 major CT surgery journals during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: All accepted submissions to The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery between April and August of 2019 and the same period in 2020 were reviewed. Article type and author characteristics were obtained from the journals. Author sex was predicted using a validated multinational database (Genderize.io) and verified with authors' institutional and public professional profiles. Results: In total, 1106 submissions were accepted during the 2019 period, whereas 900 articles (18.6% decrease) were accepted during the same period in 2020. Original research articles comprised 33.3% of the 2019 articles but only 4.9% of the 2020 articles. Female authors contributed to 39.3% (23.1% original research and 16.2% nonoriginal articles) and 29.4% (3.3% original research and 26.1% nonoriginal articles) of articles during the 2019 and 2020 periods, respectively. This represents a marked change in the type of articles that female authors contributed to. Conclusions: Early on during the COVID-19 pandemic, the type of articles accepted, and authorship demographic changed. There was a decrease in contribution of female-authored CT surgery articles submitted to both journals, especially for original research. Future research will elucidate the long-term impact of the pandemic on sex disparities in academic productivity.

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