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5.
Antimicrob Steward Healthc Epidemiol ; 1(1): e49, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860185

ABSTRACT

Challenges for infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship programs have arisen with the fourth wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, fueled by the delta variant. These challenges include breakthrough infections in vaccinated individuals, decisions to re-escalate infection prevention measures, critical medication shortages, and provider burnout. Various strategies are needed to meet these challenges.

9.
Curr Treat Options Infect Dis ; 13(4): 175-191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603023

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this article is to critically evaluate the available literature on telehealth and antimicrobial stewardship. RECENT FINDINGS: There is limited evidence regarding the role of telehealth within the discipline of antimicrobial stewardship. A review of the available literature suggests remote antimicrobial stewardship programs conducted via telehealth can decrease antimicrobial consumption. A direct comparison between traditional antimicrobial stewardship programs and remote antimicrobial stewardship programs is lacking. SUMMARY: Telehealth is a promising tool for expanding antimicrobial stewardship, especially in small rural or community hospitals. Trust, team, and technology, the three Ts of remote antimicrobial stewardship derived from themes within the available literature, can serve as a framework for developing a remote antimicrobial stewardship program.

10.
Int J Infect Dis ; 113: 103-108, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506621

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound and often devastating impact on global healthcare systems. Healthcare systems have had to repurpose programs and staff as part of COVID-19 relief efforts. The infrastructure and skilled personnel of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) have been utilized in new ways as part of COVID-19 pandemic response efforts. A critical focus of ASPs both before and during the pandemic has been on limiting the development of antimicrobial resistance. Fortunately, existing data indicate that rates of bacterial co-infection are relatively low and ASPs should continue aggressive efforts to limit unnecessary antimicrobial use. ASPs have taken a lead role in COVID-19 focused guideline creation and curation, as well as in helping to steward access to potential novel therapeutic agents. Disparities in ASP program resources and personnel exist, and ASP activities focused on the COVID-19 response should be tailored to individual settings. There is an urgent need for research to help inform ASP best practices within pandemic response efforts that take into account local resources. Investment in infrastructure and personnel is urgently needed both in the context of current relief efforts and to prepare for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Curr Infect Dis Rep ; 23(10): 15, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491370

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We describe the similarities between antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and infection prevention programs (IPPs), and we discuss how these similarities lend themselves to synergy between programs. We also discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has generated further opportunities for future collaborations that could benefit both programs. RECENT FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic has created new needs, such as real-time data and access to personnel important to both programs, such as information technologists and infectious diseases specialists. It has also increased concerns about rising rates of antimicrobial resistance and healthcare-associated infections, both of which overlap significantly and are key focus areas for both ASPs and IPPs. These emergent issues have highlighted the need for enhanced program infrastructure and new team models. The shift towards telecommunication and telework has facilitated the creation of enhanced infrastructures for collaboration on activities ranging from data access and reporting to providing telehealth services to remote hospitals. These enhanced infrastructures can be leveraged in future collaborative efforts between ASPs and IPPs. SUMMARY: Collaboration between IPPs and ASPs can mitigate setbacks experienced by health systems during the current pandemic, enhance the performance of both programs in the post-pandemic era and increase their preparedness for future pandemic threats. As health systems plan for the post-pandemic era, they should invest in opportunities for synergy between ASPs and IPPs highlighted during the pandemic.

13.
Hepatol Commun ; 5(9): 1605-1615, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400821

ABSTRACT

Simple tests of routine data are needed for those with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which causes corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19), to help identify those who may need mechanical ventilation (MV). In this study, we aimed to determine if fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) is associated with the need for MV in patients with COVID-19 and if there is an association to determine the optimal FIB-4 cutoff. This was a retrospective, national, multiethnic cohort study of adults seen in an ambulatory or emergency department setting who were diagnosed with COVID-19. We used the TriNetX platform for analysis. Measures included demographics, comorbid diseases, and routine laboratory tests. A total of 4,901 patients with COVID-19 were included. Patients had a mean age of 56, 48% were women, 42% were obese, 38% were white, 40% were black, 15% had cardiac disease, 39% had diabetes mellitus, 20% had liver disease, and 50% had respiratory disease. The need for MV was 6%. The optimal FIB-4 cutoff for the need for MV was 3.04 (area under the curve, 0.735), which had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 42%, 77%, 11%, and 95%, respectively, with 93% accuracy. When stratified by race, increased FIB-4 remained associated with the need for MV in both white and black patients. Conclusion: FIB-4 can be used by frontline providers to identify patients that may require MV.

14.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(8): 1007-1009, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349622

ABSTRACT

The use of an electronic hand hygiene monitoring system (EHHMS) decreased due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We analyzed dispenser use, hand hygiene (HH) badge use, and HH compliance to determine the effect of COVID-19 on EHHMS use and HH compliance. HH product shortages and other pandemic-induced challenges influenced EHHMS use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , Hand Hygiene , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Electronics , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Infection Control , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
16.
J Clin Transl Sci ; 5(1): e80, 2021 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196789

ABSTRACT

The rate at which the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread required a rapid response across many, if not all, industries. Academic medical centers had to rapidly evaluate, prioritize, and coordinate the multiple requests for clinical trial participation. This involved redirecting resources and developing a collaborative system for assessment, decision making, and implementation. Our institution formed a team with diverse representation from multiple stakeholders to review and prioritize all research protocols related to COVID-19. To accomplish this, a prioritization matrix was developed to help determine the order in which the protocols should be placed for consideration by the treating clinician. The purpose of the team was to review the COVID-19 clinical trials in the pipeline, prioritize those trials that best met the needs of our patients, oversee training and resource needs, and lead the formulation of procedures for integration with clinical care. Resources from the Clinical Research Unit were then allocated to support the swift execution of such studies. This manuscript describes that process, the challenges encountered, and the lessons learned on how to make all clinical trials more successful in a complex and dynamic environment.

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