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1.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 212, 2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social interactions are important for people living with dementia in a nursing home. However, not much is known about interactions and relationships between residents and family caregivers and related experiences of family caregivers. We aim to advance the knowledge on how family caregivers interact with people living with dementia in a nursing home and how they maintain or redesign a meaningful connection. METHODS: Qualitative research using interviews with family caregivers (n = 31) to explore perspectives on their interaction and relationship with the person living with dementia. Interviews were held during the reopening of nursing homes after the first COVID-19 lockdown in the Netherlands. In this situation, family caregivers became more aware of their interaction and relationship with the resident, which provided a unique opportunity to reflect on this. The interviews explored the interaction and relationship in a broad sense, not specifically for the COVID-19 situation. Thematic analysis was performed to analyze the data. RESULTS: We were able to identify three key themes reflecting the experiences of family caregivers: (1) changes in the interaction and relationship, (2) strategies to promote connection, and (3) appreciation of the interaction and relationship. From the viewpoint of family caregivers, the interaction and relationship are important for both the resident living with dementia and for themselves, and family caregivers have different strategies for establishing a meaningful connection. Nevertheless, some appear to experience difficulties with constructing such a connection with the resident. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide a basis for supporting family caregivers in perceiving and establishing mutuality and reciprocity so that they can experience togetherness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Communicable Disease Control , Dementia/epidemiology , Humans , Nursing Homes , Qualitative Research
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742464

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, restrictive measures (e.g., prohibiting physical visits and group activities) were introduced in nursing homes to protect older residents. Although the importance of social contacts and social activities to fulfill social needs and avoid loneliness is known, these were challenged during the pandemic. This qualitative study specifically focused on how residents, close relatives, and volunteers in nursing homes experienced the restrictive measures in retrospect and gained insights into the impact of the restrictive measures on social needs and loneliness, and the lessons that could be learned. Thirty semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with residents and close relatives, and one online focus group with ten volunteers, were conducted. Recruitment took place at psychogeriatric and somatic units in the Northern, Eastern and Southern regions of the Netherlands and Flanders, Belgium. The interviews and focus group were transcribed verbatim, and an open, inductive approach was used for analysis. Alternative ways of social contact could not fully compensate for physical visits. Generally, participants reported that it was a difficult time, indicated by feelings of loneliness, fear, sadness, and powerlessness. A great diversity in loneliness was reported. The most important reasons for feeling lonely were missing close social contacts and social activities. The diversity in the impact of restrictive measures depended on, e.g., social needs, coping strategies, and character. Restrictive COVID-19 measures in nursing homes resulted in negative emotions and unmet social needs of residents, close relatives, and volunteers. During future outbreaks of the COVID-19 virus or another virus or bacterium, for which restrictive measures may be needed, nursing homes should actively involve residents, close relatives, and volunteers to balance safety, self-determination, and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Nursing Homes , Volunteers
3.
Int Psychogeriatr ; : 1-10, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632653

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare the experiences of care home visits during the pandemic in the UK and the Netherlands. DESIGN: Qualitative semi-structured interview studies. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Family carers of relatives residing in care homes in the UK and the Netherlands were interviewed remotely. METHODS: Family carers were asked about their experiences of care home visits during the pandemic, and specifically in the Netherlands after care homes had reopened. Transcripts were analyzed in each country separately in the native language using thematic analysis, before discussing findings at multiple analysis meetings. RESULTS: Across 125 interviews, we developed four themes: (1) different types of contact during lockdown; (2) deterioration of resident health and well-being; (3) emotional distress of both visitors and residents; and (4) compliance to guidelines and regulations. Visiting in both the UK and the Netherlands was beneficial, if possible in the UK, yet was characterized by alternative forms of face-to-face visits which was emotionally distressing for many family carers and residents. In the Netherlands, government guidance did enable early care home visitation, while the UK was lacking any guidance leading to care homes implementing restrictions differently. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Early and clear guidance, as well as communication, is required in future pandemics, and in this ongoing pandemic, to enable care home visits between residents and loved ones. It is important to take learnings from this global pandemic to reimagine long-term care, highlighting the value of socializing for care home residents.

5.
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr ; 51(3)2020 Apr 23.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-782690

ABSTRACT

Long-term care for older adults is highly affect by the COVID-19 outbreak. The objective of this rapid review is to understand what we can learn from previous crises or disasters worldwide to optimize the care for older adults in long term care facilities during the outbreak of COVID-19. We searched five electronic databases to identify potentially relevant articles. In total, 23 articles were included in this study.Based on the articles, it appeared that nursing homes benefit from preparing for the situation as best as they can. For instance, by having proper protocols and clear division of tasks and collaboration within the organization. In addition, it is helpful for nursing homes to collaborate closely with other healthcare organizations, general practitioners, informal caregivers and local authorities. It is recommended that nursing homes pay attention to capacity and employability of staff and that they support or relieve staff where possible. With regard to care for the older adults, it is important that staff tries to find a new daily routine in the care for residents as soon as possible. Some practical tips were found on how to communicate with people who have dementia. Furthermore, behavior of people with dementia may change during a crisis. We found tips for staff how to respond and act upon behavior change. After the COVID-19 outbreak, aftercare for staff, residents, and informal caregivers is essential to timely detect psychosocial problems.The consideration between, on the one hand, acute safety and risk reduction (e.g. by closing residential care facilities and isolating residents), and on the other hand, the psychosocial consequences for residents and staff, were discussed in case of other disasters. Furthermore, the search of how to provide good (palliative) care and to maintain quality of life for older adults who suffer from COVID-19 is also of concern to nursing home organizations. In the included articles, the perspective of older adults, informal caregivers and staff is often lacking. Especially the experiences of older adults, informal caregivers, and nursing home staff with the care for older adults in the current situation, are important in formulating lessons about how to act before, during and after the coronacrisis. This may further enhance person-centered care, even in times of crisis. Therefore, we recommend to study these experiences in future research.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Dementia , Disasters , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
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