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1.
Acta Informatica Medica ; 30(1):76-80, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1863180

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute left ventricular free wall rupture (LVFWR) is a life-threatening complication of myocardial infarction that requires urgent intervention. Surgical repair has continued to be the treatment of choice. Studies suggest a posterolateral or inferior infarction is more likely to result in free wall rupture than an anterior infarction. LVFWR generally results in death within minutes of the onset of recurrent chest pain, and on average was associated with a median survival time of 8 hours. Prompt diagnosis and management can lead to successful treatment for LVFWR. Objective: The aim of this article was to present an emergency case with an LVFWR in a COVID-19 patient who suffers from AMI and was treated with PCI stents in the ramus intermedius and circumflex coronary artery. Case report: We present an emergency case with an LVFWR in a COVID-19 patient who suffers from AMI and was treated with PCI stents in the ramus intermedius and circumflex coronary artery. Although dual antiplatelet therapy introduction and good outcome of PCI were achieved, soon after instant thrombosis of both stents appear to result in transmural necrosis and LVFWR. Urgent catheterization was performed and diagnosed in-stent thrombosis where the ventriculography confirmed LVFWR of the posteroinferior wall. Urgent surgery was performed. Transmural necrosis was noticed alongside the incision line. The incision is sawn with 4 U-stitches (Prolen 2.0 with Teflon buttressed stitches). Another layer of fixation was made by Prolen 2.0 running stitches reinforced with Teflon felts from both sides. A large PTFE patch was fixed to epicardium over the suture line by Prolen 6.0 running stitch and BioGlue was injected in-between patch and LV (Figures 8 and 9). After aortic cross-clamp removal, the sinus rhythm was restored. Conclusion: Despite the high mortality, the urgency and the complexity of surgical treatment the early diagnosis plays a key role in the management of postinfarction LVFWR patients presenting a case of preserved postoperative left ventricular function and accomplished good functional status as presented in our case.

2.
Embase; 2021.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-330471

ABSTRACT

Although SARS-CoV-2 infects the upper respiratory tract, we know little about the amount, type, and kinetics of antibodies (Ab) generated at this site in response to intramuscular COVID-19 vaccination, and whether these Ab protect against subsequent “breakthrough” infections. We collected longitudinal serum and saliva samples from participants receiving two doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines over a 6-month period and measured the relative level of anti-Spike and anti-Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) Ab. We detected anti-Spike/RBD IgG and IgA and associated secretory component in the saliva of most participants receiving 1 dose of mRNA vaccine. Administration of a second dose of mRNA boosted the IgG but not the IgA response, with only 30% of participants remaining positive for IgA at this timepoint. At 6 months post-dose 2, these participants exhibited greatly diminished anti-Spike/RBD IgG and IgA levels concomitant with a reduction in neutralizing activity in the saliva, although the level of secretory component associated anti-Spike was less susceptible to decay. Examining two prospective cohorts of subjects that were monitored for infections post-vaccination, we found that participants who were subsequently infected with SARS-CoV-2 had lower levels of vaccine-induced serum anti-Spike/RBD IgA at 2-4 weeks post-dose 2 compared to participants who did not experience an infection, whereas IgG levels were comparable between groups. These data emphasize the importance of developing COVID-19 vaccines that elicit a durable IgA response.

3.
Scopus; 2021.
Preprint in English | Scopus | ID: ppcovidwho-291800

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiple long-term care (LTC) reports have issued similar recommendations for improvement across Canadian LTC homes. Our primary objective was to identify the most common recommendations made over the past 10 years. Our secondary objective was to estimate the total cost of studying LTC issues repeatedly from 1998 to 2020. Methods: The qualitative and cost analyses were conducted in Canada from July to October 2020. Using a list of reports, inquiries and commissions from The Royal Society of Canada Working Group on Long-Term Care, we coded recurrent recommendations in LTC reports. We contacted the sponsoring organizations for a cost estimate, including direct and indirect costs. All costs were adjusted to 2020 Canadian dollar values. Results: Of the 80 Canadian LTC reports spanning the years of 1998 to 2020, 24 (30%) were based on a national level and 56 (70%) were focused on provinces or municipalities. Report length ranged from 4 to 1491 pages and the median number of contributors was 14 (interquartile range, IQR, 5-26) per report. The most common recommendation was to increase funding to LTC to improve staffing, direct care and capacity (67% of reports). A median of 8 (IQR 3.25-18) recommendations were made per report. The total cost for all 80 reports was estimated to be 23,626,442.78. Conclusions: Problems in Canadian LTC homes and their solutions have been known for decades. Despite this, governments and non-governmental agencies continue to produce more reports at a monetary and societal cost to Canadians. © 2021 Wong EKC et al.

4.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-291494

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiple long-term care (LTC) reports have issued similar recommendations for improvement across Canadian LTC homes. Our primary objective was to identify the most common recommendations made over the past 10 years. Our secondary objective was to estimate the total cost of studying LTC issues repeatedly from 1998 to 2020. Methods: The qualitative and cost analyses were conducted in Canada from July to October 2020. Using a list of reports, inquiries and commissions from The Royal Society of Canada Working Group on Long-Term Care, we coded recurrent recommendations in LTC reports. We contacted the sponsoring organizations for a cost estimate, including direct and indirect costs. All costs were adjusted to 2020 Canadian dollar values. Results: Of the 80 Canadian LTC reports spanning the years of 1998 to 2020, 24 (30%) were based on a national level and 56 (70%) were focused on provinces or municipalities. Report length ranged from 4 to 1491 pages and the median number of contributors was 14 (interquartile range, IQR, 5-26) per report. The most common recommendation was to increase funding to LTC to improve staffing, direct care and capacity (67% of reports). A median of 8 (IQR 3.25-18) recommendations were made per report. The total cost for all 80 reports was estimated to be $23,626,442.78. Conclusions: Problems in Canadian LTC homes and their solutions have been known for decades. Despite this, governments and non-governmental agencies continue to produce more reports at a monetary and societal cost to Canadians.

5.
Chest ; 160(4):A1428-A1429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466155

ABSTRACT

TOPIC: Education, Research, and Quality Improvement TYPE: Original Investigations PURPOSE: The need for swift international collaboration alongside rapidly deployable remote medical knowledge transition and implementation programs has been highlighted during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Virtual programs have emerged as cost-effective alternatives to in-person education to spread best practices to resource-limited locations and garner purposeful learner engagement. Understanding local practice needs is paramount to the development of an effective quality improvement initiative. This study aimed to gain insight into the interests, clinical challenges, and attitudes of a group of interprofessional critical care providers from Bosnia and Herzegovina in preparation for a longitudinal remote education and quality improvement program. METHODS: A novel learning needs assessment tool was implemented in a cohort of critical care professionals from four hospitals in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A sequential explanatory design was employed, and a mixed-method assessment was conducted in three phases. 1) Utilizing the Delphi method, twenty statements containing common critical care entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were developed by a board of intensivists and medical education specialists. 2) Local learners used Q Sort methodology to rank-order EPAs based on self-perceived learning priorities, with subsequent by-person factor analysis. 3) Learners were invited for focus-group interviews to gather details of the rationale behind their rankings. RESULTS: Forty nine out of 105 participants completed the rank-order survey (response rate 47%). Factor analysis categorized the participants into two main groups based on the typology of their opinions, 22 participants into factor 1 and 9 participants into factor 2. The highest-ranked EPAs amongst the two factors were “evaluation and management of the patients with shock, stabilization, and resuscitation of critically ill patients” and “evaluation and management of ARDS,” respectively. Statements regarding common ICU complications and procedures were regarded as neutral. The lowest rank amongst factor 1 was “patient-centered care, communication skills, and interprofessional collaboration.” Participants in factor 2 ranked “preoperative evaluation and management” and “common hematologic and oncologic complications” the lowest. The rationale behind rank orders focused on the current patient population and perceived EPA importance to critical care practice. Participants in factor 1 displayed pessimistic attitudes toward patient-centered care and interprofessional collaboration due to cultural and healthcare system constraints. Interviewees in both factors described local challenges and expressed a need for change. CONCLUSIONS: We conducted a remote needs assessment in an international, interprofessional group of critical care providers. In addition to building trust with learners, the acquired knowledge of cultural differences, needs, and barriers to implementation will guide an ongoing remote education and quality improvement initiative. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This investigation will shape a critical care best practices quality improvement initiative and remote education program in a country with limited resources. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Marija Bogojevic, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Yue Dong, source=Web Response Patent/IP rights for a licensed product relationship with Ambient Clinical Analytics Please note: From 2016 Added 05/23/2021 by Ognjen Gajic, source=Web Response, value=Royalty no disclosure on file for Pedja Kovacevic;No relevant relationships by Heyi Li, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Aida Mujakovic, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Alexander Niven, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Manja Spahalic, source=Web Response no disclosure on file for Slavenka Straus;No relevant relationships by Simon Zec, source=Web Response

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