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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 16, 2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and text-messaging discussions in English and French. METHODS: This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data were tracked for each session, and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and others). RESULTS: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 179 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States; 75% of participants were from low- and middle-income countries. More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions, and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations; an additional 20% stated that the initiative "somewhat" improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will "definitely use" the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work; an additional 20% will "probably use" and 9% would "possibly use" this knowledge in their work. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced WHO's ability to disseminate knowledge, provide normative guidance, and share best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real time. This approach allowed WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and training to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programs moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Simulation Training , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291538

ABSTRACT

Background: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and SMS-messaging discussions in English and French. Methods This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data was tracked for each session and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and other). Results The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 181 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States;78% of participants were from low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations;an additional 20.3% stated that the initiative “somewhat” improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will “definitely use” the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work;an additional 19.7% will “probably use” and 8.6% would “possibly use” this knowledge in their work. Conclusion The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced the WHO’s ability to disseminate knowledge, normative guidance, and best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real-time. This approach allowed the WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and trainings to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. The WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programmes moving forward.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S98-S105, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been an unprecedented global health challenge. Traditional modes of knowledge dissemination have not been feasible. A rapid solution was needed to share guidance and implementation examples within the global infection prevention and control (IPC) community. We designed the IPC Global Webinar Series to bring together subject matter experts and IPC professionals in the fight against COVID-19. METHODS: The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) model was adapted to create an interactive global knowledge network. Speakers and panelists provided presentations and answers to questions. Webinars were simultaneously interpreted into 5 languages and recorded for later access. RESULTS: Thirteen webinar sessions were completed from 14 May through 6 August 2020. On average, 634 participants attended each session (range, 393-1181). Each session was represented by participants from, on average, more than 100 countries. CONCLUSIONS: Through the IPC Global Webinar Series, critical information was shared and peer-to-peer learning was promoted during the COVID-19 pandemic response. The webinar sessions reached a broader audience than many in-person events. The webinar series was rapidly scaled and can be rapidly reactivated as needed. Our lessons learned in designing and implementing the series can inform the design of other global health virtual knowledge networks. The continued and expanded use of adapted virtual communities of practice and other learning networks for the IPC community can serve as a valuable tool for addressing COVID-19 and other infectious disease threats.The infection prevention and control (IPC) Global Webinar Series convened subject matter experts and IPC professionals from more than 100 countries to establish a global learning community for COVID-19. We advocate for expanded use of virtual knowledge networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(6): e1009583, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256050

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic reveals a major gap in global biosecurity infrastructure: a lack of publicly available biological samples representative across space, time, and taxonomic diversity. The shortfall, in this case for vertebrates, prevents accurate and rapid identification and monitoring of emerging pathogens and their reservoir host(s) and precludes extended investigation of ecological, evolutionary, and environmental associations that lead to human infection or spillover. Natural history museum biorepositories form the backbone of a critically needed, decentralized, global network for zoonotic pathogen surveillance, yet this infrastructure remains marginally developed, underutilized, underfunded, and disconnected from public health initiatives. Proactive detection and mitigation for emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) requires expanded biodiversity infrastructure and training (particularly in biodiverse and lower income countries) and new communication pipelines that connect biorepositories and biomedical communities. To this end, we highlight a novel adaptation of Project ECHO's virtual community of practice model: Museums and Emerging Pathogens in the Americas (MEPA). MEPA is a virtual network aimed at fostering communication, coordination, and collaborative problem-solving among pathogen researchers, public health officials, and biorepositories in the Americas. MEPA now acts as a model of effective international, interdisciplinary collaboration that can and should be replicated in other biodiversity hotspots. We encourage deposition of wildlife specimens and associated data with public biorepositories, regardless of original collection purpose, and urge biorepositories to embrace new specimen sources, types, and uses to maximize strategic growth and utility for EID research. Taxonomically, geographically, and temporally deep biorepository archives serve as the foundation of a proactive and increasingly predictive approach to zoonotic spillover, risk assessment, and threat mitigation.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Community Networks/organization & administration , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Animals , Animals, Wild , Biodiversity , Biological Specimen Banks/standards , Biological Specimen Banks/supply & distribution , Biological Specimen Banks/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/microbiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Community Networks/standards , Community Networks/supply & distribution , Community Networks/trends , Disaster Planning/methods , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/standards , Geography , Global Health/standards , Global Health/trends , Humans , Medical Countermeasures , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/prevention & control
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S98-S105, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been an unprecedented global health challenge. Traditional modes of knowledge dissemination have not been feasible. A rapid solution was needed to share guidance and implementation examples within the global infection prevention and control (IPC) community. We designed the IPC Global Webinar Series to bring together subject matter experts and IPC professionals in the fight against COVID-19. METHODS: The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) model was adapted to create an interactive global knowledge network. Speakers and panelists provided presentations and answers to questions. Webinars were simultaneously interpreted into 5 languages and recorded for later access. RESULTS: Thirteen webinar sessions were completed from 14 May through 6 August 2020. On average, 634 participants attended each session (range, 393-1181). Each session was represented by participants from, on average, more than 100 countries. CONCLUSIONS: Through the IPC Global Webinar Series, critical information was shared and peer-to-peer learning was promoted during the COVID-19 pandemic response. The webinar sessions reached a broader audience than many in-person events. The webinar series was rapidly scaled and can be rapidly reactivated as needed. Our lessons learned in designing and implementing the series can inform the design of other global health virtual knowledge networks. The continued and expanded use of adapted virtual communities of practice and other learning networks for the IPC community can serve as a valuable tool for addressing COVID-19 and other infectious disease threats.The infection prevention and control (IPC) Global Webinar Series convened subject matter experts and IPC professionals from more than 100 countries to establish a global learning community for COVID-19. We advocate for expanded use of virtual knowledge networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ann Emerg Med ; 78(2): 223-228, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188271

ABSTRACT

Tasked with identifying digital health solutions to support dynamic learning health systems and their response to COVID-19, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response partnered with the University of New Mexico's Project ECHO and more than 2 dozen other organizations and agencies to create a real-time virtual peer-to-peer clinical education opportunity: the COVID-19 Clinical Rounds Initiative. Focused on 3 "pressure points" in the COVID-19 continuum of care-(1) the out-of-hospital and/or emergency medical services setting, (2) emergency departments, and (3) inpatient critical care environments-the initiative has created a massive peer-to-peer learning network for real-time information sharing, engaging participants in all 50 US states and more than 100 countries. One hundred twenty-five learning sessions had been conducted between March 24, 2020 and February 25, 2021, delivering more than 58,000 total learner-hours of contact in the first 11 months of operation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Medical Services , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , Learning Curve , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 255, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069968

ABSTRACT

The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has rapidly spread in Africa, with a total of 474,592 confirmed cases by 11th July 2020. Consequently, all policy makers and health workers urgently need to be trained and to access the most credible information to contain and mitigate its impact. While the need for rapid training and information dissemination has increased, most of Africa is implementing public health social and physical distancing measures. Responding to this context requires broad partnerships and innovative virtual approaches to disseminate new insights, share best practices, and create networked communities of practice for all teach, and all learn. The World Health Organization (WHO)-Africa region, in collaboration with the Extension for Community Health Outcome (ECHO) Institute at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC), the West Africa college of nurses and the East Central and Southern Africa college of physicians, private professional associations, academia and other partners has embarked on a virtual training programme to support the containment of COVID-19. Between 1st April 2020 and 10th July 2020, about 7,500 diverse health professionals from 172 locations in 58 countries were trained in 15 sessions. Participants were from diverse institutions including: central ministries of health, WHO country offices, provincial and district hospitals and private medical practitioners. A range of critical COVID-19 preparedness and response interventions have been reviewed and discussed. There is a high demand for credible information from credible sources about COVID-19. To mitigate the "epidemic of misinformation" partnerships for virtual trainings and information dissemination leveraging existing learning platforms and networks across Africa will augment preparedness and response to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Capacity Building , Information Dissemination/methods , Public Health , Africa/epidemiology , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
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