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1.
Nurse Leader ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1624621
2.
Mil Med ; 185(3-4): e448-e456, 2020 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455332

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical error is the third leading cause of death in the United States, contributing to suboptimal care, serious patient injury, and mortality among beneficiaries in the Military Health System. Recent media reports have scrutinized the safety and quality of military healthcare, including surgical complications, infection rates, clinician competence, and a reluctance of leaders to investigate operational processes. Military leaders have aggressively committed to a continuous cycle of process improvement and a culture of safety with the goal to transform the Military Health System into a high-reliability organization. The cornerstone of patient safety is effective clinician communication. Military surgical teams are particularly susceptible to communication error because of potential barriers created by military rank, clinical specialty, and military culture. With an operations tempo requiring the military to continually deploy small, agile surgical teams, effective interpersonal communication among these team members is vital to providing life-saving care on the battlefield. METHODS: The purpose of our exploratory, prospective, cross-sectional study was to examine the association between social distance and interpersonal communication in a military surgical setting. Using social network analysis to map the relationships and structure of interpersonal relations, we developed six networks (interaction frequency, close working relationship, socialization, advice-seeking, advice-giving, and speaking-up/voice) and two models that represented communication effectiveness ratings for each participant. We used the geodesic or network distance as a predictor of team member network position and assessed the relationship of distance to pairwise communication effectiveness with permutation-based quadratic assignment procedures. We hypothesized that the shorter the network geodesic distance between two individuals, the smaller the difference between their communication effectiveness. RESULTS: We administered a network survey to 50 surgical teams comprised of 45 multidisciplinary clinicians with 522 dyadic relationships. There were significant and positive correlations between differences in communication effectiveness and geodesic distances across all five networks for both general (r = 0.819-0.894, P < 0.001 for all correlations) and task-specific (r = 0.729-0.834, P < 0.001 for all correlations) communication. This suggests that a closer network ties between individuals is associated with smaller differences in communication effectiveness. In the quadratic assignment procedures regression model, geodesic distance predicted task-specific communication (ß = 0.056-0.163, P < 0.001 for all networks). Interaction frequency, socialization, and advice-giving had the largest effect on task-specific communication difference. We did not uncover authority gradients that affect speaking-up patterns among surgical clinicians. CONCLUSIONS: The findings have important implications for safety and quality. Stronger connections in the interaction frequency, close working relationship, socialization, and advice networks were associated with smaller differences in communication effectiveness. The ability of team members to communicate clinical information effectively is essential to building a culture of safety and is vital to progress towards high-reliability. The military faces distinct communication challenges because of policies to rotate personnel, the presence of a clear rank structure, and antifraternization regulations. Despite these challenges, overall communication effectiveness in military teams will likely improve by maintaining team consistency, fostering team cohesion, and allowing for frequent interaction both inside and outside of the work environment.


Subject(s)
Communication , Patient Care Team , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , United States
3.
Mil Med ; 186(12 Suppl 2): 50-55, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381024

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic stressed healthcare systems worldwide and exposed major flaws in military and civilian healthcare systems. Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) serves as the only military medical center for over 205,000 U.S. service members, beneficiaries, and coalition partners stationed throughout Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. The pandemic response required LRMC leaders to reconfigure services to meet pandemic concerns while providing lifesaving care to injured service members from combatant commands. The quickly evolving pandemic challenged leaders to ensure healthcare delivery amid constant change and imperfect information. While LRMC senior leaders developed a strategic pandemic response plan, a multidisciplinary team of nurses, doctors, and technicians collaborated to create an inpatient team to support the dual mission of coronavirus disease 2019 response and casualty care for the warfighter. In this manuscript, we discuss how a multidisciplinary clinical working group at a regional medical center prepared and responded to the pandemic, strategically planned patient care, and ensured support to combatant commands for ongoing forward military operations. Additionally, we share our experiences and lessons learned to inform other military facilities across the medical community and global healthcare systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , Inpatients , Leadership , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurse Lead ; 19(5): 483-488, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267867

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic overwhelmed health care systems and exposed major gaps in preparedness and response plans. The crisis challenged nurse leaders to develop and implement novel care delivery plans while preventing disease transmission to patients and staff. COVID-19 required nurse leaders to make decisions in an environment of conflicting data and directives. The authors share essential nurse leader competencies vital to the development and support of thriving nurse leaders. As crises persist and future challenges arise, nurse leaders can leverage these essential competencies to successfully drive engagement, lead ahead of consensus, and define the shadows of limited, incomplete, and conflicting data.

6.
Nurs Forum ; 56(1): 222-227, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060345

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic ushered in a new era for advanced practice registered nurses, as emergency regulatory and policy changes expanded the nurse practitioner (NP) scope of practice. The legislative changes enabled NPs to bolster the national pandemic response by working to the full extent of their education and training. The changes are only temporary, and many have contemplated the permanent impact of COVID-19 when healthcare transitions to a postpandemic normal. NPs now have a unique opportunity to educate others about the merit of their role and advocate for permanent legislative changes. In this creative controversy manuscript, we build a case that national NP full practice authority increases access to care and is vital for a sustainable and resilient healthcare system that can react to future pandemic crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Care Reform/organization & administration , Nurse Practitioners/legislation & jurisprudence , Practice Patterns, Nurses'/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Perianesth Nurs ; 35(4): 353-356, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607363

ABSTRACT

Nurses have historically led efforts to improve the health of populations while simultaneously and unselfishly providing care during pivotal moments of national need. The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented strain on the US health care system, including severe shortages of hospital beds, supplies, equipment, pharmaceuticals, and healthy frontline clinicians. Perioperative and perianesthesia leaders and clinicians have unique opportunities to provide patient care during the COVID-19 crisis. In this manuscript, we describe the initial changing roles and contributions of perioperative and perianesthesia registered nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic and share recent experiences from a military medical center. Perioperative and perianesthesia nurses are vital to the overall nursing viability of the health care system, as they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to provide expert clinical care in many hospital settings and meet the demands of a global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, Military , Perioperative Nursing/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Nurse's Role , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
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