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1.
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction ; : 103001, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1819504

ABSTRACT

In recent years, the unprecedented death tolls resulting from epidemics and natural disasters made everyone interested, from the general public to country heads, to know about the mortality rates. The coronavirus issue is the most recent example all over the media, and everyone is talking about corona-induced mortality. The study aimed to estimate the disaster-induced mortality rates at the global level for two hundred and ten countries for fifteen years (2001–2015). Using a retrospective study design, we extracted datasets from two data sources, EM-DAT and UNFPA, in October 2019. The cut-off time for the data download was midnight Central European Time, October 17, 2019. The most noticeably finding in this study is that, against the common prevailing notion, both developed and developing countries equally carry the brunt of disaster-induced mortality. This study proposes empirical confirmation of the direction and magnitude of any year-over-year correlation of disaster and mortality rates. Furthermore, the analysis of the trend in mortality rate over the past fifteen years concludes that the mortality rate is not linear. However, there are huge variations across the years and the countries. The study is of paramount importance to initiate a debate amongst the concerned policymakers and stakeholders to monitor the disaster-induced mortality rates regularly. So that effective interventions can be devised to decrease the disaster-induced mortality rate.

3.
Transl Psychiatry ; 12(1): 98, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795801

ABSTRACT

Network analysis is an effective approach for examining complex relationships between psychiatric symptoms. This study was designed to examine item-level relationships between depressive and anxiety symptoms using network analysis in an adolescent sample and identified the most central symptoms within the depressive-anxiety symptoms network model. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionire-9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Screener (GAD-7), respectively. The structure of depressive and anxiety symptoms was characterized using "Strength" and "Bridge Strength" as centrality indices in the symptom network. Network stability was tested using a case-dropping bootstrap procedure. Finally, a Network Comparison Test (NCT) was conducted to examine whether network characteristics differed on the basis of gender, school grade and residence. Network analysis revealed that nodes PHQ2 ("Sad mood"), GAD6 ("Irritability"), GAD3 ("Worry too much"), and PHQ6 ("Guilty") were central symptoms in the network model of adolescents. Additionally, bridge symptoms linking anxiety and depressive symptoms in this sample were nodes PHQ6 ("Guilty"), PHQ2 ("Sad mood"), and PHQ9 ("Suicide ideation"). Gender, school grade and residence did not significantly affect the network structure. Central symptoms (e.g., Sad mood, Irritability, Worry too much, and Guilty) and key bridge symptoms (e.g., Guilty, Sad mood, and Suicide ideation) in the depressive and anxiety symptoms network may be useful as potential targets for intervention among adolescents who are at risk for or suffer from depressive and anxiety symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
4.
J Affect Disord ; 307: 142-148, 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increased risk of mental health problems including suicide in many subpopulations, but its influence on stable patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been studied fleetingly. This study examined the one-year prevalence of suicidality including suicidal ideation (SI), suicide plans (SP), and suicide attempts (SA) as well as their correlates in clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted between October 1, 2020, and October 15, 2021, in six tertiary psychiatric hospitals. Socio-demographic information, clinical data and one-year prevalence of suicidality were recorded. RESULTS: Altogether, 1718 participants who met the eligibility criteria were included. The overall one-year prevalence of suicidality during the COVID-19 pandemic was 68.04% (95% confidence intervals (CI) =65.84-70.25%), with one-year SI prevalence of 66.4% (95%CI = 64.18-68.65%), SP prevalence of 36.26% (95%CI = 33.99-38.54%), and SA prevalence of 39.35% (95%CI = 37.04-41.66%). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed male gender, married marital status, college education level and above and age were negatively associated with risk of suicidality. Urban residence, unemployed work status, experiences of cyberbullying, a history of suicide among family members or friends, and more severe fatigue, physical pain, and residual depressive symptoms were positively associated with risk of suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Suicidality is common among clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regular suicide screening and preventive measures should be provided to clinically stable MDD patients during the pandemic.

5.
J Med Ethics ; 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779408

ABSTRACT

Although the prevalence of facial recognition-based COVID-19 surveillance tools and techniques, China does not have a facial recognition law to protect its residents' facial data. Oftentimes, neither the public nor the government knows where people's facial images are stored, how they have been used, who might use or misuse them, and to what extent. This reality is alarming, particularly factoring in the wide range of unintended consequences already caused by good-intentioned measures and mandates amid the pandemic. Biometric data are matters of personal rights and national security. In light of worrisome technologies such as deep-fake pornography, the protection of biometric data is also central to the protection of the dignity of the citizens and the government, if not the industry as well. This paper discusses the urgent need for the Chinese government to establish rigorous and timely facial recognition laws to protect the public's privacy, security, and dignity amid COVID-19 and beyond.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776221

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Domestic violence is a threat to human dignity and public health. Mounting evidence shows that domestic violence erodes personal and public health, spawning issues such as lifelong mental health challenges. To further compound the situation, COVID-19 and societies' poor response to the pandemic have not only worsened the domestic violence crisis but also disrupted mental health services for domestic violence victims. While technology-based health solutions can overcome physical constraints posed by the pandemic and offer timely support to address domestic violence victims' mental health issues, there is a dearth of research in the literature. To bridge the research gap, in this study, we aim to examine technology-based mental health solutions for domestic violence victims amid COVID-19. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to examine solutions that domestic violence victims can utilize to safeguard and improve their mental health amid COVID-19. Databases including PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus were utilized for the literature search. The search was focused on four themes: domestic violence, mental health, technology-based interventions, and COVID-19. A reverse search of pertinent references was conducted in Google Scholar. The social ecological model was utilized to systematically structure the review findings. RESULTS: The findings show that a wide array of technology-based solutions has been proposed to address mental health challenges faced by domestic violence victims amid COVID-19. However, none of these proposals is based on empirical evidence amid COVID-19. In terms of social and ecological levels of influence, most of the interventions were developed on the individual level, as opposed to the community level or social level, effectively placing the healthcare responsibility on the victims rather than government and health officials. Furthermore, most of the articles failed to address risks associated with utilizing technology-based interventions (e.g., privacy issues) or navigating the online environment (e.g., cyberstalking). CONCLUSION: Overall, our findings highlight the need for greater research endeavors on the research topic. Although technology-based interventions have great potential in resolving domestic violence victims' mental health issues, risks associated with these health solutions should be comprehensively acknowledged and addressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Technology
7.
Front Immunol ; 13: 839433, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775671

ABSTRACT

Background: Omicron scares and speculations are gaining momentum. Amid the nonstop debates and discussions about COVID-19 vaccines, the "vaccine fatigue" phenomenon may become more prevalent. However, to date, no research has systematically examined factors that shape people's vaccine fatigue. To bridge the research gap, this study aims to investigate the antecedents that cause or catalyze people's vaccine fatigue. Methods: A narrative literature review was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO to identify factors that shape people's vaccine fatigue. The search was completed on December 6, 2021, with a focus on scholarly literature published in English. Results: A total of 37 articles were reviewed and analyzed. Vaccine fatigue was most frequently discussed in the context of infectious diseases in general at the pre-vaccination stage. Vaccine fatigue has been identified in the general public, the parents, and the doctors. Overall, a wide range of antecedents to vaccine fatigue has been identified, ranging from the frequency of immunization demands, vaccine side effects, misconceptions about the severity of the diseases and the need for vaccination, to lack of trust in the government and the media. Conclusion: Vaccine fatigue is people's inertia or inaction towards vaccine information or instruction due to perceived burden and burnout. Our study found that while some contributors to vaccine fatigue are rooted in limitations of vaccine sciences and therefore can hardly be avoided, effective and empathetic vaccine communications hold great promise in eliminating preventable vaccine fatigue across sectors in society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Fatigue , Humans , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 795841, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753414

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Domestic violence is toxic to society. With approximately one in three women on average falling victim to domestic violence, systematic solutions are needed. To further complicate the issue, mounting research shows that COVID-19 has further exacerbated domestic violence across the world. Situations could be even more pronounced in countries like China, where though domestic violence is prevalent, there is a dearth of research, such as intervention studies, to address the issue. This study investigates key barriers to domestic violence research development in China, with a close focus on salient cultural influences. Methods: A review of the literature on domestic violence in China in PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus was conducted to answer the research question. The search was focused on three themes, domestic violence, China, research, and cultural influences. Results: The study findings show that categorizing domestic violence as a "family affair" is a key barrier to domestic violence research development in China-an incremental hindrance that prevents the public and policymakers from understanding the full scale and scope of domestic violence in China. In addition to abusers, witnesses, and victims, even law enforcement in China often dismisses domestic violence crimes as "family affairs" that resides outside the reach and realm of the law. The results indicated that mistreating domestic violence crimes as "family affairs" is a vital manifestation of the deep-rooted cultural influences in China, ranging from traditional Confucian beliefs in social harmony to the assumed social norms of not interfering with other people's businesses. Conclusion: Domestic violence corrupts public health and social stability. Our study found that dismissing domestic violence cases as "family affairs" is an incremental reason why China's domestic violence research is scarce and awareness is low. In light of the government's voiced support for women's rights, we call for the Chinese government to develop effective interventions to timely and effectively address the domestic violence epidemic in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence , China/epidemiology , Domestic Violence/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Public Health
9.
Brain Behav Immun ; 102: 206-208, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719357

ABSTRACT

Just weeks away from the Opening Ceremony of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics, the United States, followed by Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada, has declared a diplomatic boycott of the Games. A diplomatic boycott stipulates that while government officials of these countries will not attend the event, the athletes' scheduled attendance will largely remain intact. An unintended consequence of the boycotts is that they force the attending athletes to cope with the stress and distress associated with the 2022 Winter Olympics in an unfamiliar environment on their own. It is important to underscore that many of the challenges the athletes could face amid the Games are either deep-rooted or unprecedented, ranging from stressors fuelled by the nonstop media reports, the competitions, to the Omicron scares. These insights combined, in turn, underscore the imperative for effective and preemptive mental health support for Olympic athletes. To shed light on the issue, this paper highlights the reasons why timely solutions are needed to adequately safeguard Olympic athletes' mental health and overall wellbeing, and underlines promising technology-based solutions that can be cost-effectively designed and developed for the athletes.


Subject(s)
Psychoneuroimmunology , Sports , Athletes , Humans , Seasons , United Kingdom
11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322157

ABSTRACT

Background: One of the most vulnerable populations to COVID-19 is women. Multiple factors associated with violence against women (i.e. sexual assault, domestic violence, homelessness) create an increased vulnerability for women during the COVID pandemic. Women also constitute the majority of older nursing home residents and healthcare workers (e.g., nurses), who have the most pronounced exposure to COVID-19. These factors combined with resource restraints like rationing and lack of access to healthcare can further exacerbate women’s physical and psychological health issues. While literature has well-documented challenges that women face during COVID-19, there is a lack of evidence-based solutions that have the potential to mitigate these difficulties. Therefore, to address this issue, we aim to conduct a systematic review of the literature to: (1) identify interventions designed for women in the context of pandemics, (2) describe the characteristics and effects of these interventions concerning the distinctive traits of women and pandemics, and (3) present evidence-based health solutions for women to mitigate challenges they face amid and beyond COVID-19. Methods A systematic review of literature will be conducted on databases including PubMed, PsycINFO on the EBSCO platform, CINAHL on the EBSCO platform, and Scopus, based on a search strategy developed in consultation with an experienced medical librarian. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles will be screened against eligibility criteria developed a priori . The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses procedures will be adopted as the reporting framework, and data extracted (e.g., intervention details) will be evaluated by a multidisciplinary research team. Results NA for now—This is a protocol study. Conclusions Findings of this study will fill an important void in the literature. Considering that, in times of pandemic, women are especially subject to grim health disparities, like pronounced exposure to COVID-19, reproductive health issues, elevated domestic violence, increased mental health challenges, and lack of access to healthcare services, the need for evidence-based health solutions that could address these unique challenges is of paramount importance. A comprehensive understanding of the characteristics and effects of health solutions available to women in the context of pandemics can also help researchers identify areas of improvement regarding intervention design and development. This may further safeguard women’s health and wellbeing amid pandemics like COVID-19 and beyond. Study Protocol Registration: PROSPERO CRD42020194003

12.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322156

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer patients are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, partially owing to their compromised immune systems and curbed or cut cancer healthcare services caused by the pandemic. As a result, cancer caregivers may have to shoulder triple crises: the COVID-19 pandemic, pronounced healthcare needs from the patient, and elevated need for care from within. While technology-based health interventions have the potential to address unique challenges cancer caregivers face amid COVID-19, limited insights are available. Thus, to bridge this gap, we aim to identify technology-based interventions designed for cancer caregivers and report the characteristics and effects of these interventions concerning cancer caregivers' distinctive challenges amid COVID-19. Methods: : A systematic search of the literature will be conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus from the database inception to the end of March, 2021. Articles that center on technology-based interventions for cancer caregivers will be included in the review. The search strategy will be developed in consultation with an academic librarian who is experienced in systematic review studies. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles will be screened against eligibility criteria developed a priori . The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses procedures will be followed for the reporting process. Conclusions: : COVID-19 has upended cancer care as we know it. Findings of this study can shed light on evidence-based and practical solutions cancer caregivers can utilize to mitigate the unique challenges they face amid COVID-19. Furthermore, results of this study will also offer valuable insights for researchers who aim to develop interventions for cancer caregivers in the context of COVID-19. In addition, we also expect to be able to identify areas for improvement that need to be addressed in order for health experts to more adequately help cancer caregivers weather the storm of global health crises like COVID-19 and beyond. Study Protocol Registration: PROSPERO CRD42020196301

13.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322155

ABSTRACT

Background: Infectious diseases are dangerous and deadly. As the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in all demographics across the world, infectious diseases carry substantial social, economic, and healthcare costs. Unlike previous global health crises, health experts now have access to more advanced tools and techniques to understand pandemics like COVID-19 better and faster;one such class of tools is artificial intelligence (AI) enabled disease surveillance systems. AI-based surveillance systems allow health experts to perform rapid mass infection prediction to identify potential disease cases, which is integral to understanding transmission and curbing the spread of the pandemic. However, while the importance of AI-based disease surveillance mechanisms in pandemic control is clear, what is less known is the state-of-the-art application of these mechanisms in countries across the world. Therefore, to bridge this gap, we aim to systematically review the literature to identify (1) how AI-based disease surveillance systems have been applied in counties worldwide amid COVID-19, (2) the characteristics and effects of these applications regarding the control of the spread of COVID-19, and (3) what additional disease surveillance resources such as database, AI-based tools and techniques that can be further added to the current toolbox in the fight against COVID-19. Methods: : To locate research on AI-based disease surveillance amid COVID-19, we will search databases including PubMed, IEEE Explore, ACM Digital Library, and Science Direct to identify all potential records. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles were screened against eligibility criteria developed a priori . The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses procedures was adopted as the reporting framework. Results: : NA for now Conclusions: : Findings of our study will fill an important void in the literature, as no research has systematically reviewed available AI-based disease surveillance in the context of COVID-19. As the world continues to reel from COVID-19, it is important to identify cost-effective AI-based disease surveillance mechanisms that can detect COVID-19 cases and explain how one COVID-19 case turns into many cases, so that better prevention measures can be established to curb the spread of the COVID pandemic in a timely manner. Study Protocol Registration: PROSPERO CRD42020204992

14.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1964, 2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671629

ABSTRACT

With evidence-based measures, COVID-19 can be effectively controlled by advanced data analysis and prediction. However, while valuable insights are available, there is a shortage of robust and rigorous research on what factors shape COVID-19 transmissions at the city cluster level. Therefore, to bridge the research gap, we adopted a data-driven hierarchical modeling approach to identify the most influential factors in shaping COVID-19 transmissions across different Chinese cities and clusters. The data used in this study are from Chinese officials, and hierarchical modeling conclusions drawn from the analysis are systematic, multifaceted, and comprehensive. To further improve research rigor, the study utilizes SPSS, Python and RStudio to conduct multiple linear regression and polynomial best subset regression (PBSR) analysis for the hierarchical modeling. The regression model utilizes the magnitude of various relative factors in nine Chinese city clusters, including 45 cities at a different level of clusters, to examine these aspects from the city cluster scale, exploring the correlation between various factors of the cities. These initial 12 factors are comprised of 'Urban population ratio', 'Retail sales of consumer goods', 'Number of tourists', 'Tourism Income', 'Ratio of the elderly population (> 60 year old) in this city', 'population density', 'Mobility scale (move in/inbound) during the spring festival', 'Ratio of Population and Health facilities', 'Jobless rate (%)', 'The straight-line distance from original epicenter Wuhan to this city', 'urban per capita GDP', and 'the prevalence of the COVID-19'. The study's results provide rigorously-tested and evidence-based insights on most instrumental factors that shape COVID-19 transmissions across cities and regions in China. Overall, the study findings found that per capita GDP and population mobility rates were the most affected factors in the prevalence of COVID-19 in a city, which could inform health experts and government officials to design and develop evidence-based and effective public health policies that could curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Hotspot , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , China , Cities/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , Regression Analysis
15.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 21: 100426, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670201

ABSTRACT

One of the leading health consequences of the pandemic is the prevalence of sleep-related issues, such as insomnia. Hence, this study highlights the relationship between COVID-19 and insomnia and how insomnia is increasing due to the pandemic. The study's findings summarise that the COVID-19 pandemic has produced ubiquitous mental challenges, including loneliness, anxiety, fear, stress, extreme tiredness, and health concerns. It is also associated with physical issues such as social isolation, juggling work or study, parenting challenges, and significant behavior changes stemming from mass home confinement. There are also economic hardships, financial insecurity, risk, and infection. These factors lead to undoing routines and broken circadian rhythms amid the pandemic, affecting three sleep regulatory processes of the homeostatic sleep drive, the circadian rhythm, and the arousal system. Furthermore, we suggest future research directions to explore (1) long-term health impacts of the pandemic, (2) therapeutic strategies and the implementation of social policies to support people with sleep difficulties, (3) prevention programs and clinical interventions, and (4) nationwide or cross-regional online and practical psychological and sleep management intervention systems and platforms to address the psychological strain of isolation and traumatic experiences of the pandemic.

16.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 20: 100424, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664676

ABSTRACT

The Beijing, 2022 Olympics will be the second Games held amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the unique circumstances the 2022 Games face-the Omicron spread, high virus transmissibility in winters, and uncertainties about vaccine efficacy and future variants of concern, safety measures amid the Beijing, 2022 Games will be one of the most intricate among large international events held during the pandemic. To ensure athletes' health, safety, and ability to participate in the Games, the organizers have introduced the Olympic COVID-free "bubble" protection ecosystem, in which COVID-free athletes could stay and be protected from potential infections that could upend their Games plans, if not their career as well. However, while staying in the "bubble" is key for athletes' health and success, there is a lack of insights on factors that might prevent athletes from continuing their scheduled Olympic journey as scheduled. To shed light on the issue, based on Beijing, 2022 Olympic Playbooks and most up-to-date guidance issued, this article and its accompanying infographic were developed to illustrate factors that could influence athletes' ability to join and stay in the "bubble", participate in the Games, and further build their career. Furthermore, we also adapted and integrated easy-to-adopt mental health de-stress techniques recommended by the World Health Organization to help athletes better thrive amid the Beijing, 2022 Winter Olympics, in or outside of the "bubble".

17.
Brain Behav Immun ; 101: 211-213, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631106

ABSTRACT

One of the most daunting unintended consequences of the digital revolution is the digital divide (DD), a pervasive social and information inequality. It negatively affects all sectors of society, and exerts compounding influences on other social inequities. To further complicate the situation, the COVID-19 pandemic has been intensifying the scale of DD and deepening the scope of DD barriers with the increasing but imbalanced applications of digital technologies. For instance, while digital technologies can provide support to fulfill people's mental health needs, recurring evidence shows that DD-prone people are more likely to be excluded from critical services, activities, and resources to support their health concerns and challenges. So far, studies about the mental health consequences of DD amid COVID-19 are limited. Available evidence suggests that the general mental health impacts of COVID-19 include anxiety, depression, and suicidal behaviors, while the mental health consequences of DD due to COVID-19 are mainly stress, distress, and anxiety. To shed light on the research gap, based on the social inequality roots of DD and the nexus between DD barriers and factors of social inequalities, this study highlights the alarming overlap between DD-prone communities and vulnerable populations. Furthermore, we underscore the future research directions that could help society better serve both underserved communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digital Divide , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613734

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Obesity could deepen women's susceptibility to COVID-19 infections and deaths. While physical activity has the potential to improve women's physical and psychological resilience to the pandemic, there is a dearth of research on factors that motivate women's participation in physical activity. Thus, to bridge the research gap, this study aims to identify factors that motivate women's participation in physical activity. (2) Methods: An online survey on motivations for physical activity was developed and distributed to the participants. A total of 108 women offered complete answers (N = 108, 18-33 years old, Mage = 20.34 ± 2.42 years). Participants selected factors that promote their physical activity from a list of 34 factors from the Reasons to Participate in Physical Activity Scale (RPPAS) developed in this study. (3) Results: Exploratory factor analysis revealed that factors that motivate women's participation in physical activity are: enjoyment and gratification, consideration for other activities (i.e., exergaming), health benefits, networking opportunities, and appearance and performance. Multiple linear regression analyses indicate that only consideration for appearance and performance was significantly associated with participants' physical activity levels after controlling for compounding factors. (4) Conclusions: The findings of this study underscore the importance of appearance and performance in shaping women's participation in physical activity. Furthermore, the results also emphasize the need for a nuanced understanding of factors that influence women's physical activity levels. Future research could investigate how to leverage these motivators in tailored health interventions that aim to improve women's physical activity.

19.
J Affect Disord ; 301: 463-471, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examined the extent to which the network structure of anxiety and depression among adolescents identified during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic could be cross-validated in a sample of adolescents assessed after the COVID-19 peak. METHODS: Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted between February 20 and 27, 2020 and between April 11 and 19, 2020, respectively. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder, respectively. Anxiety-depression networks of the first and second assessments were estimated separately using a sparse Graphical Gaussian Model combined with the graphical least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method. A Network Comparison Test was conducted to assess differences between the two networks. RESULTS: The most central symptoms in the first and second survey networks were Depressed affect and Nervousness. Compared with connections in the first survey network, connections in the second survey network analysis between Relax-Nervousness-Depressed affect-Interpersonal problems (diff, contrast: second survey-first survey. diff=-0.04, P = 0.04; diff=-0.03, P = 0.03; diff=-0.03, P = 0.04), and Irritability-Somatic complaints (diff=-0.04, P = 0.02) were weaker while connections of Somatic complaints-Nervousness (diff=0.05, P<0.001), Somatic complaints-Depressed affect (diff=0.03, P = 0.009), and Irritability-Control worry-Restlessness (diff=0.02, P = 0.03; diff=0.05, P = 0.02) were stronger. CONCLUSIONS: Depressed affect emerged as a robust central symptom and bridge symptom across Anxiety-Depression networks. Considering the negative impact of depression and anxiety on daily life, timely interventions targeting depressed affect should be implemented to reduce the co-occurrence of anxious and depressive symptoms among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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