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1.
Langenbecks Arch Surg ; 2022 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2027493

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To understand the actual impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and frame the future strategies, we conducted a pan India survey to study the impact on the surgical management of gastrointestinal cancers. METHODS: A national multicentre survey in the form of a questionnaire from 16 tertiary care gastrointestinal oncology centres across India was conducted from January 2019 to June 2021 that was divided into a 15-month pre-Covid era and a similar period of active Covid pandemic era. RESULTS: There was significant disruption of services; 13 (81%) centres worked as dedicated Covid care centres and 43% reported suspension of essential care for more than 6 months. In active Covid phase, there was a 14.5% decrease in registrations and proportion of decrease was highest in the centres from South zone (22%). There was decrease in resections across all organ systems; maximum reduction was noted in hepatic resections (33%) followed by oesophageal and gastric resections (31 and 25% respectively). There was minimal decrease in colorectal resections (5%). A total of 584 (7.1%) patients had either active Covid-19 infection or developed infection in the post-operative period or had recovered from Covid-19 infection. Only 3 (18%) centres reported higher morbidity, while the rest of the centres reported similar or lower morbidity rates when compared to pre-Covid phase; however, 6 (37%) centres reported slightly higher mortality in the active Covid phase. CONCLUSION: Covid-19 pandemic resulted in significant reduction in new cancer registrations and elective gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Perioperative morbidity remained similar despite 7.1% perioperative Covid 19 exposure.

2.
researchsquare; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-1824719.v1

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To understand the actual impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and frame the future strategies, we conducted a pan India survey to study the impact on the surgical management of gastrointestinal cancers.Methods: A national multicentre survey in the form of a questionnaire from 16 tertiary care gastrointestinal oncology centres across India was conducted from January 2019 to June 2021 that was divided into a 15-month pre-Covid era and a similar period of active Covid pandemic era.Results: There was significant disruption of services; 13 (81%) centres worked as dedicated Covid care centres and 43% reported suspension of essential care for more than 6 months. In active Covid phase there was a 14.5% decrease in registrations and proportion of decrease was highest in the centres from South zone (22%). There was decrease in resections across all organ systems; maximum reduction was noted in hepatic resections (33%) followed by esophageal and gastric resections (31 and 25% respectively). There was minimal decrease in colorectal resections (5%). A total of 584 (7.1%) patients had either active Covid-19 infection or developed infection in the post-operative period or had recovered from Covid-19 infection. Only 3(18%) centres reported higher morbidity, while rest of the centres reported similar or lower morbidity rates when compared to pre-Covid phase; however 6 (37%) centres reported slightly higher mortality in the active Covid phase.Conclusion: Covid -19 pandemic resulted in significant reduction is new cancer registrations and elective gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Perioperative morbidity remained similar despite 7.1% perioperative Covid -19 exposure. 


Subject(s)
COVID-19
3.
Indian Journal of Transplantation ; 16(1):3-7, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1798826

ABSTRACT

From the context of organ donation, COVID-19 vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is important as there is an ethical dilemma in utilizing versus discarding organs from potential donors succumbing to VITT. This consensus statement is an attempt by the National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organization (NOTTO) apex technical committees, India, to formulate the guidelines for deceased organ donation and transplantation in relation to VITT to help in appropriate decision-making. VITT is a rare entity, but a meticulous approach should be taken by the organ procurement organization's (OPO) team in screening such cases. All such cases must be strictly notified to the national authorities (NOTTO) as a resource for data collection and ensuring compliance with protocols in the management of adverse events following immunization. Organs from any patient who developed thrombotic events up to 4 weeks after adenoviral vector-based vaccination should be considered to be linked to VITT and investigated appropriately. The viability of the organs must be thoroughly checked by the OPO, and the final decision in relation to organ use should be decided by the expert committee of the OPO team consisting of a virologist, a hematologist, and a treating team. Considering the organ shortage, in case of suspected/confirmed VITT, both clinicians and patients should consider the riskbenefit equation based on limited experience. An appropriate written informed consent of potential recipients and family members should be obtained before the transplantation of organs from suspected or proven VITT donors.

4.
Transplant Proc ; 2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482999

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine and its utility in solid organ transplantation need to be timely revised and updated. These guidelines have been formalized by the experts-the apex technical committee members of the National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organization and the heads of transplant societies-for the guidance of transplant communities. We recommend that all personnel involved in organ transplantation should be vaccinated as early as possible and continue COVID-19-appropriate behavior despite a full course of vaccination. For specific guidelines of recipients, we suggest completing the full schedule before transplantation whenever the clinical condition permits. We also suggest a single dose, rather than proceeding unvaccinated for transplant, in case a complete course is not feasible. If vaccination is planned before surgery, we recommend a gap of at least 2 weeks between the last dose of vaccine and surgery. For those not vaccinated before transplant, we suggest waiting 4 to 12 weeks after transplant. For the potential living donors, we recommend the complete vaccination schedule before transplant. However, if this is not feasible, we suggest receiving at least a single dose of the vaccine 2 weeks before donation. We suggest that suitable transplant patients and those on the waiting list should accept a third dose of the vaccine when one is offered to them. We recommend that organs from a deceased donor with suspected/proven vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia should be avoided and are justified only in cases of emergency situations with informed consent and counseling.

5.
Indian Journal of Nephrology ; 31(2):89-91, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1224290

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection started in Wuhan and resulted in a pandemic within a few weeks' time. Organ transplant recipients being at a risk for more severe COVID-19 if they get SARS CoV-2 viral infection, COVID-19 vaccine has a significant role in these patients. The vaccine is a safer way to help build protection and would either prevent COVID-19 infection or at least diminish the severity of the disease. It would also reduce the risk of the continuing transmission and enhance herd immunity. Immuno-compromised patients should not receive live vaccines as they can cause vaccine-related disease and hence the guidelines suggest that all transplant recipients should receive age-appropriate 'inactivated vaccine' as recommended for general population. Though trials have not been undertaken on transplant recipients, efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccine have been scientifically documented for few vaccines among the general population.

6.
Indian Journal of Transplantation ; 15(1):1-3, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1187091

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 Novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) infection started in Wuhan and resulted in a pandemic within few weeks' time. Organ transplant recipients being at a risk for more severe COVID-19 if they get SARS CoV-2 viral infection, COVID 19 Vaccine has a significant role in these patients. The vaccine is a safer way to help build protection and would either prevent COVID -19 infection or atleast diminish the severity of the disease. It would also reduce the risk of the continuing transmission and enhance herd immunity. Immuno compromised patients should not receive live vaccines as they can cause vaccine related disease and hence the guidelines suggest that all transplant recipients should receive age appropriate 'inactivated vaccine' as recommended for general population. Though trials have not been undertaken on transplant recipients, efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccine have been scientifically documented for few vaccines among the general population. © 2021 Indian Journal of Transplantation ;Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

7.
Hepatol Int ; 14(4): 429-431, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-42114

ABSTRACT

The Liver Transplant Society of India (LTSI) has come up with guidelines for transplant centres across the country to deal with liver transplantation during this evolving pandemic of COVID-19 infection. The guidelines are applicable to both deceased donor as well as living donor liver transplants. In view of the rapidly changing situation of COVID-19 infection in India and worldwide, these guidelines will need to be updated according to the emerging data.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Liver Diseases/therapy , Liver Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , India , Liver Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
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