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1.
AIDS Behav ; 26(7): 2338-2348, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638039

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from the Love and Sex in the Time of COVID survey, an online survey with US gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men. The first round of the Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May, 2020: the second round was collected November 2020 to January 2021. GBMSM were recruited through advertisements featured on social networking platforms. Analysis examines changes in self-reported measures of sexual behavior (number of sex partners, number of anal sex partners and number of anal sex partners not protected by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or condoms) between those with complete data for round one and round two of the surveys (n = 280). While in round one, men reported a moderate willingness to have sex during COVID-19 (3.5 on a scale from 1 to 5), this had reduced significantly to 2.1 by round two. Men reported declines in the number of unprotected anal sex partners since pre-COVID. Perceptions of a longer time until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with increases in the number of sex partners and UAI partners. The results illustrate some significant declines in sexual behavior among GBMSM as the COVID-19 pandemic progressed. As vaccine programs continue to roll out across the U.S, as lockdowns ease and as we return to some normalcy, it will be important to continue to think critically about ways to re-engage men in HIV prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexual Behavior , Sexual and Gender Minorities , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data
2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(7)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295956

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from an online sample of U.S gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM), to explore the factors associated with three dimensions of vaccine beliefs: perception of the likelihood of a COVID-19 vaccine becoming available, perception of when a COVID-19 vaccine would become available, and the likelihood of taking a COVID-19 vaccine. Data are taken from the Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 study, collected from November 2020 to January 2021. A sample of 290 GBMSM is analyzed, modeling three binary outcomes: belief that there will be a COVID-19 vaccine, belief that the COVID-19 vaccine will be available in 6 months, and being very likely to take the COVID-19 vaccine. In contrast to other studies, Black/African Americans and GBMSM living with HIV had higher levels of pandemic optimism and were more likely to be willing to accept a vaccine. Men who perceived a higher prevalence of COVID-19 among their friends and sex partners, and those who had reduced their sex partners, were more likely to be willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine. There remained a small percentage of participants (14%) who did not think the pandemic would end, that there would not be a vaccine and were unlikely to take a vaccine. To reach the levels of vaccination necessary to control the pandemic, it is imperative to understand the characteristics of those experiencing vaccine hesitancy and then tailor public health messages to their unique set of barriers and motivations.

3.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(15-16): NP14166-NP14188, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192167

ABSTRACT

In addition to the growing morbidity and mortality related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (SAR-CoV-2) pandemic, social distancing measures during the pandemic may result in increased intimate partner violence (IPV). However, it is yet unknown if gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM)'s IPV risk has increased during this time. This article describes and analyzes IPV experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of coupled-GBMSM in the United States. We hypothesized that pandemic-driven stressors would be associated with increased IPV prevalence and severity. A sample of 214 coupled men living in the US who had previously participated in HIV-related couple studies was surveyed in July-September 2020. Respondents reported demographic, sexual and substance use behaviors, and relationship characteristics. Surveys also collected data on pandemic-related life-changes (employment, substance use, COVID-19 illness). IPV victimization and perpetration were measured with the Gay and Bisexual Men Intimate Partner Violence scale and measured individually experienced or perpetrated violence, sexual, emotional, monitoring, or controlling behaviors, and if a given behavior was new and/or had changed in frequency during the pandemic. Reported prevalence and pandemic-related changes in victimization and perpetration were described. New or more frequent IPV victimization was modeled against employment, substance use changes, COVID-19 illness, and outside sexual partners (modified by a couple's sexual agreement). IPV perpetration prevalence was 15.17%, 34.44% of which was new or more frequent. Victimization prevalence was 14.95%, of which 46.88% was new or more frequent. After adjustment, outside sexual partners were associated with IPV among those with nonmonogamous sexual agreements; each outside sexual partner increased the odds of new or more frequent victimization by 70% (OR = 1.70; 95% CI [1.16, 2.51]). Given this study's documented rise in IPV among a sample of coupled men, additional research into IPV predictors, interventions, and support strategies in GBMSM populations are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intimate Partner Violence , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Substance-Related Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology
4.
AIDS Behav ; 25(11): 3798-3803, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188122

ABSTRACT

Sexual agreements are an important element of HIV prevention for many partnered gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM). This study describes sexual agreement and sexual behavior changes during the 2020 pandemic among a sample of 215 coupled US GBMSM. Overall, reported behavior shifted towards monogamy. Fifteen percent of respondents developed/ended/changed their agreement during the pandemic; the pandemic factored into 85% of reported changes. Individuals reported fewer outside sexual partners compared to the 3 months pre-pandemic. More research is needed to investigate shifting behavior and associated risk in order to adapt HIV services during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexual Partners
5.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(13-14): NP12174-NP12189, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119376

ABSTRACT

Stay at home orders-intended to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by limiting social contact-have forced people to remain in their homes. The additional stressors created by the need to stay home and socially isolate may act as triggers to intimate partner violence (IPV). In this article, we present data from a recent online cross-sectional survey with gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the United States to illustrate changes in IPV risks that have occurred during the U.S. COVID-19 epidemic. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May 2020. GBMSM were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 696 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes in victimization and perpetration of IPV during the 3 months prior to the survey (March-May 2020) that represents the first 3 months of lockdown during the COVID-19 epidemic. During the period March-May 2020, 12.6% of participants reported experiencing any IPV with higher rates of emotional IPV (10.3%) than sexual (2.2%) or physical (1.8%) IPV. Of those who reported IPV victimization during lockdown, for almost half this was their first time experience: 5.3% reported the IPV they experienced happened for the first time during the past 3 months (0.8% physical, 2.13% sexual, and 3.3% emotional). Reporting of perpetration of IPV during lockdown was lower: only 6% reported perpetrating any IPV, with perpetration rates of 1.5% for physical, 0.5% for sexual, and 5.3% for emotional IPV. Of those who reported perpetration of IPV during lockdown, very small percentages reported that this was the first time they had perpetrated IPV: 0.9% for any IPV (0.2% physical, 0.2% sexual, and 0.6% emotional). The results illustrate an increased need for IPV resources for GBMSM during these times of increased stress and uncertainty, and the need to find models of resource and service delivery that can work inside of social distancing guidelines while protecting the confidentiality and safety of those who are experiencing IPV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intimate Partner Violence , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Male , United States/epidemiology
6.
Am J Mens Health ; 14(5): 1557988320957545, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772041

ABSTRACT

While there is evidence of variations in the risk perceptions of COVID-19 and that they are linked to both engagement in health-protective behaviors and poor mental health outcomes, there has been a lack of attention to how individuals perceive the risk of COVID-19 relative to other infectious diseases. This paper examines the relative perceptions of the severity of COVID-19 and HIV among a sample of U.S. gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSMs). The "Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19" survey was conducted online from April 2020 to May 2020. GBMSMs were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, resulting in a sample size of 696. The analysis considers differences in responses to two scales: the Perceived Severity of HIV Infection and the Perceived Severity of COVID-19 Infection. Participants perceived greater seriousness for HIV infection (mean 46.67, range 17-65) than for COVID-19 infection (mean 38.81, range 13-62). Some items reflecting more proximal impacts of infection (anxiety, loss of sleep, and impact on employment) were similar for HIV and COVID-19. Those aged over 25 and those who perceived higher prevalence of COVID-19 in the United States or their state were more likely to report COVID-19 as more severe than HIV. There is a need to develop nuanced public health messages for GBMSMs that convey the ongoing simultaneous health threats of both HIV and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk-Taking , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Bisexuality/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Sexual Behavior , Survival Analysis , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
AIDS Behav ; 25(1): 40-48, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739667

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from a recent cross-sectional survey of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the US, to understand changes in sexual behavior and access to HIV prevention options (i.e. condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)) during the COVID-19 lockdown period. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May, 2020. GBMSM were recruited through advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 518 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes three in self-reported measures of sexual behavior: number of sex partners, number of anal sex partners and number of anal sex partners not protected by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or condoms. Approximately two-thirds of the sample reported that they believed it was possible to contract COVID-19 through sex, with anal sex reported as the least risky sex act. Men did not generally feel it was important to reduce their number of sex partners during COVID-19, but reported a moderate willingness to have sex during COVID-19. For the period between February and April-May 20,202, participants reported a mean increase of 2.3 sex partners during COVID-19, a mean increase of 2.1 anal sex partners (range - 40 to 70), but a very small increase in the number of unprotected anal sex partners. Increases in sexual behavior during COVID-19 were associated with increases in substance use during the same period. High levels of sexual activity continue to be reported during the COVID-19 lockdown period and these high levels of sexual activity are often paralleled by increases in substance use and binge drinking. There is a clear need to continue to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care services during COVID-19, and telehealth and other eHealth platforms provide a safe, flexible mechanism for providing services.


Subject(s)
Bisexuality/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Condoms/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Unsafe Sex/psychology , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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