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1.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2086921

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Clinical research staff play a critical role in recruiting families for pediatric research, but their views are not well described. We aimed to describe how pediatric research staff build trusting research relationships with patients and their families. Method(s): We interviewed research staff at one pediatric research institution and its affiliated academic medical center between November 2020 and February 2021. Staff were eligible if they conducted participant recruitment, consent, and/or enrollment for clinical research. We developed our semi-structured interview guide based on a framework for trusting researchercommunity partnerships. Result(s): We interviewed 28 research staff, with a median age of 28 years (range 22-50) and a median of 5 years of experience (range 1-29). Interviewees identified factors relevant to relationship building across three levels: The individual staff member, the relational interaction with the family, and the institutional or other structural backdrop. Individual factors included how staff developed recruitment skills, their perceived roles, and their personal motivations. Relational factors spanned four stages of recruitment: before the approach, forming an initial connection with a family, building the connection, and following up. Structural factors related to access and diversity, clinical interactions, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion(s): Research staff discussed tensions and supports with various actors, challenges with the integration of research and clinical care, the importance of voluntariness for building trust, and multiple contributors to inequities in research. These findings reveal the importance of ensuring research staff have a voice in institutional policies and are supported to advocate for patients and families. Copyright © 2022 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

2.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Supplement 2):A21, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064011

ABSTRACT

Aims A recent RCPCH publication shared the struggles across Paediatric Emergency Departments (PEDs) with meeting the 'Facing the Future' standards for children and young people (CYP) with mental health (MH) concerns, with few units studied being able to adequately meet the needs of CYP in MH crisis (1). We work in a central London teaching hospital and major trauma centre: our aim was to understand the experience of CYP aged 13-17 presenting to the PED with MH concerns, as compared with those presenting with physical complaints. Methods Collection of quantitative data surrounding CYP in the ED with MH presentations (n=271), including time to be seen, time to see Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), time to admission or discharge, and total time spent in ED (all as compared with physical health presentations n=7551). Use of independent samples t-tests to analyse differences between groups across outcomes. Two time periods (1 July-30 Oct 2019 and 1 July-30 Oct 2021, n= 3913 and 3909 respectively) were examined to encapsulate pre and post COVID. Qualitative inquiry with 22 CYP presenting to the ED to co-produce experience maps to visualise their healthcare journeys and identify opportunities to improve their care. Results CYP with MH presentations spent a mean time of 747.6 minutes in the ED, compared with physical health patients who spent 195.76 minutes (p=<0.001). Mean time to be seen by CAMHS was 225.0 minutes, whereas patients with physical health complaints who are referred to specialties waited 196.52 minutes to be seen (a difference that was not significant). More CYP with MH presentations than those with physical health presentations spent >4 hours but <12 hours in the ED (76.4% vs 18.4%, p<0.001) and almost 1/3 spent more than 12 hours in the ED (32.8% vs 1.0%, p<0.001). Experience mapping captured that CYP and families acknowledged the wait but would benefit from signposting of the physical environment (e.g. 'you are here' maps), the presence of age-appropriate entertainment, and the input of volunteers or staff to support basic needs (e.g. food, water, pillows): we are implementing each. Conclusion CYP with MH presentations have a worse experience of the ED than their counterparts with physical health complaints, spending longer in the department, being more likely to surpass 4 or 12 hours in the ED. CYP have indicated to us some simple changes to their environment and the management of their stay which could improve their experience. It is widely acknowledged that most areas need to grow our provision of CAMHS to meet the need, but we also need to further utilise other MH services available beyond hospital walls (e.g. crisis lines, wellbeing practitioners, school counselling, youth support services). (1) John Criddle, Virginia Davies, RCPCH Website https:// www.rcpch.ac.uk/news-events/news/time-raise-standard-childrenpresenting- emergency-departments-mental-health-crisis.

3.
Structural Engineer ; 100(5):26-33, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1958192

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the key design and construction challenges of the Compton and Edrich stands – two striking additions to Lord’s Cricket Ground in London. The new stands increase the capacity of the ground and bring new sponsor boxes and other modern facilities. The design includes steel moment frames and a steel-framed canopy, with a secondary timber beam network, partially covering the stands. The varying geometry of the stands required complex steelwork fabrication. Construction challenges included the programme constraints of working around the cricket seasons, and the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic around six months after work began on site. © 2022, Institution of Structural Engineers. All rights reserved.

4.
Social Problems in the Age of Covid-19, Vol 1: Us Perspectives ; : 49-58, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1441745
5.
Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 223(5):743-751, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1254723

ABSTRACT

Background. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent plasma (CCP) received an Emergency Use Authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). CCP with a signal-to-cutoff ratio of >= 12 using the Ortho VITROS severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunoglobulin G (IgG) test (OVSARS2IgG) is permitted to be labeled "high titer." Little is known about the relationship between OVSARS2IgG ratio and neutralizing capacity of plasma/sera against genuine SARS-CoV-2. Methods. Nine hundred eighty-one samples from 196 repeat CCP donors 0-119 days post-initial donation (DPID) were analyzed. Neutralizing capacity was assessed for 50% (PRNT50) and 90% (PRNT90) reduction of infectious virus using the gold standard plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). A subset of 91 donations was evaluated by OVSARS2IgG and compared to PRNT titers for diagnostic accuracy. Results. Of donations, 32.7%/79.5% (PRNT90/PRNT50) met a 1:80 titer initially but only 14.0%/48.8% (PRNT90/PRNT50) met this cutoff >= 85 DPID. Correlation of OVSARS2IgG results to neutralizing capacity allowed extrapolation to CCP therapy results. CCP with OVSARS2IgG ratios equivalent to a therapeutically beneficial group had neutralizing titers of >= 1:640 (PRNT50) and/or >= 1:80 (PRNT90). Specificity and positive predictive value of the OVSARS2IgG for qualifying highly neutralizing CCP was optimal using ratios significantly greater than the FDA cutoff. Conclusions. This information provides a basis for refining the recommended properties of CCP used to treat COVID-19.

6.
Social Problems in the Age of COVID-19: US Perspectives ; 1:49-58, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-934870
7.
Journal of Swine Health and Production ; 28(4), 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-847592
8.
Journal of Swine Health and Production ; 28(3), 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-731537
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