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1.
Australasian Leisure Management ; 141:44-46, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2012651

ABSTRACT

This article considers the future of guaranteed contract sums for aquatic and recreation facility management contracts now that closures and disruptions as a consequence of COVID-19 have resulted in so many being varied to such an extent that they may as well have been non-guaranteed/fee for service.

2.
British Food Journal ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1612743

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Global food fraud incidents are regularly reported and are on the rise due to the ineffectiveness of traditional food safety intervention strategies. The increase in food fraud opportunity is prevalent in the state of the COVID-19 pandemic as well. Food fraud vulnerability assessment (FFVA) is acknowledged as a critical requirement by the Global Food Safety Initiatives (GFSIs) and the World Health Organisation for an effective food fraud mitigation plan. However, there is no clear direction or ways to identify and analyse food fraud vulnerability factors based on real-data. Design/methodology/approach: Combining the barrier analysis technique and the routine activity theory to review the 580 cases of food fraud recorded in the Decernis database, this paper identified new food fraud vulnerability dimensions and insights pinpointed to three categories of opportunity, motivation and countermeasures. Findings: New dimensions of food fraud vulnerability factors are identified in this paper over the period 2000–2018. Where possible, new insights related to each food fraud vulnerability factor and dimension were identified, and literature evidence was used to confirm their contribution. Originality/value: There is a gap observed in the first step of FFVA in the literature. This paper is the first study to undertake a FFVA based on evidence recorded in a global food fraud database. This paper offers critical insights into global food fraud regulations by exploring the new emerging root causes of food fraud and analysing them, supporting developing effective food fraud prevention plans (FFPPs). © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

3.
Radiotherapy and Oncology ; 161:S241-S242, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1492800

ABSTRACT

Purpose or Objective CD19 CAR-T therapy is the most effective salvage treatment for relapsed/refractory DLBCL. However the manufacture of CAR-T cells takes several weeks and patients (pts) are at risk of progression during this time and usually require some form of bridging therapy to contain their disease. Radiotherapy (RT) is an attractive bridging option, as the chance of response to further conventional cytotoxic therapy is low. RT is generally delivered in the window between apheresis and infusion and requires careful scheduling. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, toxicity and early outcome of bridging RT in a cohort of pts undergoing CAR-T therapy for DLBCL. Materials and Methods This was a prospective analysis of pts receiving bridging RT since the start of CAR-T programme at our institution. We collected data on pt demographics, disease and RT details, as well as outcomes including early response, relapse, survival and toxicity. Results (Table presented.) Between April 2019 & January 2021 a total of 27 pts have received bridging RT. Of these 23 have been infused (1 not infused due to COVID19, 1 due to cardiac function & 2 pending). The CAR-T therapy was delivered in 1 Haematology Institution, but bridging RT in 9 different referring centres. Pt and disease characteristics and RT details are shown in table 1. The median time from CT planning scan to start of RT was 10 days (4-42). The median time between apheresis and start of RT was 5 days (-37-21;3 patients received RT prior to apheresis at -37,-35 &-29 days) and median time between end of RT and CAR-T infusion was 19 days (10-116). No pts were delayed due to RT toxicity. Toxicity data was available for 22 pts. 10 (45.5%) reported no toxicity. Only 1 pt had grade 3 toxicity (vomiting & diarrhoea) and RT was stopped. The most common toxicities were skin reaction (n=5) & fatigue (n=4). 25/27 (92.6%) pts underwent a PET-CT between bridging RT & infusion. In 22 (88%) pts there was response in treatment field (CMR=2, PMR=20). In 13 (59.1%) of those pts there was evidence of progressive disease (PD) outside the field, but none were prevented from receiving CAR-T infusion due to PD. With median FU of 8.8 (0.6-20.6) months from date of CAR-T infusion, 12/ 23 (52.2%) infused pts have relapsed, (2 infield, 5 out of field, 5 in both) with a local control rate of 69.6%;CMR (12;52.2%) and PMR (4;17.4%). 7 pts have died since infusion, 6 due to PD and 1 due to sepsis. Median PFS was 5.1 months (95% CI 0.0-11.9 months) and median OS 17.8 months (95% CI 12.7-22.9 months). 1 pt had infusion delayed due to COVID19 infection and died of PD. Conclusion RT was a safe and effective bridging option in this cohort of DLBCL pts pre CAR-T therapy. With close collaboration between Haematologists and Radiation Oncologists, it is possible to deliver a course of radical dose RT in the narrow window between apheresis and infusion, even across a wide geographical network. Further work is required to determine which pts benefit most from bridging RT and the optimal dose and schedule.

4.
New Zealand Medical Journal ; 134(1537):9-17, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303165

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Aotearoa New Zealand adopted a clear 'elimination strategy', which has (up to June 2021) been very successful in both health and economic terms compared to other OECD countries. Nevertheless, the pandemic response has still been a very major shock to the New Zealand health system. This issue of the New Zealand Medical Journal has 14 new pandemic-related articles. Some of this work can help inform vaccination prioritisation decisions and inform preparations of primary and secondary care services and social services for any future raising of levels in the pandemic Alert Level system. Particularly strong themes are around the value (and challenges) of telehealth services, and also the need for responses throughout the health system to ensure health equity and support for the most vulnerable citizens.

5.
New Zealand Medical Journal ; 133(1527):8-14, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1061705

ABSTRACT

Between August and November 2020, Aotearoa New Zealand experienced eight known failures of the COVID-19 border control system. Multiple introductions of this highly transmissible virus into New Zealand's almost completely susceptible population present a high risk of uncontrollable spread, threatening New Zealand's elimination strategy. In this editorial, we propose that, although steps are being taken reactively in response to these known breaches, systematic underestimation of risk across the pandemic response makes future failures inevitable. We present an epidemiological framework for identifying and addressing risk, giving examples of actions that can be taken to reduce the probability of further outbreaks and enable New Zealand to benefit from sustained elimination of COVID-19.

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