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1.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 32(4): 1152-1157, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869921

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a pandemic with varied clinical presentations. Patients with an underlying comorbidity such as diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) had an increased risk of developing secondary bacterial and fungal coinfections which was further accentuated by the use of steroids during the management and with prolonged intensive care unit stay. This case series describes the clinical course of two patients with CKD who developed acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection and mucormycosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mucormycosis , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Med J Armed Forces India ; 2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and has emerged as a deadly pandemic affecting countries all over the world. Here we share our experience of managing adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and concomitant COVID-19 infection jointly managed by pediatric and adult nephrology teams. METHODS: This retrospective study was done on patient admissions (>18 years) between 20th June- 30th October 2020 with previously diagnosed CKD and hospitalised with COVID-19 infection. The demographic details, underlying comorbidities, clinical presentation, medications, laboratory, radiological profile and outcomes were studied. RESULTS: A total of 213 adults (62% males) with CKD were admitted during this period with a median (IQR) age of 52 (42, 60) years; 75 (35.2%) had associated diabetes mellitus, 83.1% hypertension, 5.2% hypothyroidism and 7% coronary artery disease. 165 (77.5%) were on maintenance haemodialysis (MHD), and 72.8% had arteriovenous fistula as vascular access at presentation. Most (84.5%) patients were symptomatic for COVID-19, and about 2/3 diarrhoea had moderate to severe disease. Oxygen therapy was needed in 62.9%, and medications used were hydroxychloroquine in 84.5%, azithromycin in 21.6%, ivermectin in 82.6%, steroids in 63.8% and Low molecular weight heparin in 59.2%. A further comparison of patients with CKD5D and CKDND revealed similar parameters except for a higher incidence of diarrhoea, acute kidney injury (AKI) and a shorter period to RTPCR negativity (12.5 vs 15 days; P = 0.038) in CKDND. The overall mortality was 24.4%, with similar mortality rates in both groups (P = 0.709) and 20.7% needed ICU transfer. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with CKD especially on haemodialysis, are prone to more severe COVID-19 infection and take a longer time for viral clearance (>2 weeks); the mortality too is higher in these patients.

3.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 37(4): 849-857, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Information on the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the presentation and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with CKD followed at any of the four pediatric nephrology centers in New Delhi from April 2020 to June 2021. Outcomes, including cardiopulmonary and renal complications, were reported in relation to underlying disease category and illness severity at presentation. RESULTS: Underlying illness in 88 patients included nephrotic syndrome (50%), other CKD stages 1-4 (18.2%), CKD 5D (17%), and CKD 5T (14.8%). Thirty-two of 61 patients with symptomatic COVID-19 and 9/27 asymptomatic patients were admitted for median 10 (interquartile range 7-15) days. Seventeen (19.3%) patients developed moderate or severe COVID-19. Systemic complications, observed in 30 (34.1%), included acute kidney injury (AKI, 34.2%), COVID-19 pneumonia (15.9%), unrelated pulmonary disease (2.3%), and shock (4.5%). Nineteen (21.6%) had severe complications (AKI stage 2-3, encephalopathy, respiratory failure, shock). Eight (11%) of twelve (16.4%) patients with severe AKI required dialysis. Three (3.4%) patients, two with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in relapse and one with CKD 1-4, died due to respiratory failure. Univariate logistic regression indicated that patients presenting with nephrotic syndrome in relapse or moderate to severe COVID-19 were at risk of AKI (respective odds ratio, 95%CI: 3.62, 1.01-12.99; 4.58, 1.06-19.86) and/or severe complications (respective odds ratio, 95%CI: 5.92, 1.99-17.66; 61.2, 6.99-536.01). CONCLUSIONS: Children with CKD presenting with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 or in nephrotic syndrome relapse are at risk of severe complications, including severe AKI and mortality. A higher resolution version of the Graphical abstract is available as Supplementary information.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Child , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Med J Armed Forces India ; 77(Suppl 1): S79-S84, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062524

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The lockdown imposed due to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in adopting electronic learning (e-learning) as the means of education in various institutions all over India. This study aimed to collect the experiences of faculty and students regarding e-learning in medical colleges during COVID-19 and to analyse the likely perceived benefits and problems to choose blended learning activities after the COVID crisis. METHODS: A survey-based study was conducted among undergraduate students and faculty members in medical colleges of Delhi-NCR. RESULT: Two hundred forty-eight medical students and 23 faculty members participated in the study. Two hundred twelve (85.4%) students considered medical education to be severely affected during the lockdown and 219 (88.3%) students found the online classes to be useful. Poor connectivity followed by lack of human interface and poor sound or acoustics were the major hindering factors, whereas convenience and access were reported as important facilitating factors. In the postlockdown phase, 135 (54.4%) students want online classes to be continued in addition to classroom teaching for the cognitive domain, 42 (16.9%) students want it for both cognitive and psychomotor domain and 60 (24.1%) do not want online classes. The majority of the faculty members (65.2%) were in favour of including online teaching modules in routine curriculum and 69.6% suggested a 70%:30% distribution of traditional and online classes after the COVID lockdown. CONCLUSION: Implementation of e-learning within the existing curriculum is bound to be challenging; however, it remains the only solution during COVID-19 imposed lockdown for maintaining the chain of learning.

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