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1.
Cardiol J ; 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1912015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This meta-analysis outlines the role of elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in assessing the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The current study was designed as a systematic review and meta-analysis. Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to identify the usefulness of LDH as a marker of COVID-19 severity. All extracted data were analyzed using RevMan V.5.4 or STATA V.14 software. RESULTS: A total of 264 records were selected for this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis showed that LDH levels were statistically significantly lower in the group of survivors compared to patients who died in hospital (standardized mean differences [SMD] = -3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -3.40 to -2.79; I² = 99%; p < 0.001). Lower LDH levels were observed in non-severe groups compared to severe course of COVID-19 (SMD = -2.38; 95% CI: -2.61 to -2.14; I² = 99%; p < 0.001). The level of LDH was statistically significantly lower in the severe group compared to the critical group (SMD = -1.48; 95% CI: -2.04 to -0.92; I² = 98%; p < 0.001). Patients who did not require treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) showed significantly lower levels of LDH compared to patients who required treatment in the ICU (SMD = -3.78; 95% CI: -4.48 to -3.08; I² = 100%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis showed that elevated LDH was associated with a poor outcome in COVID-19.

2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(6)2022 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911465

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19 is a pandemic disease, and its unpredictable outcome makes it particularly dangerous, especially for pregnant women. One of the decisions they have to make is where they will give birth. This study aimed to determine the factors influencing the choice of place of delivery and the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic on these factors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 517 respondents from Poland. The research methods comprised the authors' own survey questionnaire distributed via the Internet from 8 to 23 June 2021. The survey was fully anonymous, voluntary, and addressed to women who gave birth during the pandemic or will give birth shortly. Results: A total of 440 (85.1%) respondents were afraid of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The most frequently indicated factors were fear of complications in the newborn, fear of intrauterine fetal death, and congenital disabilities in a newborn. A total of 74 (14.3%) women considered home delivery. The main factors that discouraged the choice of home birth were the lack of professional medical care 73.1% (N = 378), the lack of anesthesia 23.6% (N = 122), and the presence of indications for caesarean section 23.4% (N = 121). The possibility of mother-child isolation caused the greatest fear about hospital delivery. During the COVID-19 pandemic, pregnant women concerned about SARS-CoV-2 infection were more likely to consider home delivery than those without such fears. The most important factors affecting the choice of the place of delivery included the possibility of a partner's presence, excellent sanitary conditions and optimal distance from the hospital, and the availability of epidural analgesia for delivery. Conclusions: Our study identifies the determinants of place of delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data we obtained can result in the healthcare system considering patients' needs in case of similar crisis in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Internet , Male , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Medicina ; 58(6):831, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1894256

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19 is a pandemic disease, and its unpredictable outcome makes it particularly dangerous, especially for pregnant women. One of the decisions they have to make is where they will give birth. This study aimed to determine the factors influencing the choice of place of delivery and the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic on these factors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 517 respondents from Poland. The research methods comprised the authors' own survey questionnaire distributed via the Internet from 8 to 23 June 2021. The survey was fully anonymous, voluntary, and addressed to women who gave birth during the pandemic or will give birth shortly. Results: A total of 440 (85.1%) respondents were afraid of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The most frequently indicated factors were fear of complications in the newborn, fear of intrauterine fetal death, and congenital disabilities in a newborn. A total of 74 (14.3%) women considered home delivery. The main factors that discouraged the choice of home birth were the lack of professional medical care 73.1% (N = 378), the lack of anesthesia 23.6% (N = 122), and the presence of indications for caesarean section 23.4% (N = 121). The possibility of mother–child isolation caused the greatest fear about hospital delivery. During the COVID-19 pandemic, pregnant women concerned about SARS-CoV-2 infection were more likely to consider home delivery than those without such fears. The most important factors affecting the choice of the place of delivery included the possibility of a partner's presence, excellent sanitary conditions and optimal distance from the hospital, and the availability of epidural analgesia for delivery. Conclusions: Our study identifies the determinants of place of delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data we obtained can result in the healthcare system considering patients' needs in case of similar crisis in the future.

4.
Signa Vitae ; 18(3):153-157, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1856562

ABSTRACT

Point-of-care testing (POCT) plays an increasingly important role in pre-emergency medicine by ensuring that patient's continuum of care is commenced before arrival at health facilities. Given the benefits of POCT during the COVID-19 pandemic, this commentary described the advantages and disadvantages of POCT, and its current practices in pre-hospital emergency medicine. Point-of-care tests are easy to operate, cost-effective, and yield quick and accurate response, but are posed with challenges such as safety errors, poor adherence to quality control standards, and inspection errors. To optimize the benefits of POCT in pre-emergency medicine, it is required that regular trainings are conducted for POCT operators, and total compliance to POCT handling and management guidelines should be considered by each POCT operator. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Signa Vitae is the property of Pharmamed Mado Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

6.
Cardiol J ; 29(3): 533-534, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811134

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Am J Emerg Med ; 59: 174-175, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803388
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792723

ABSTRACT

Acute Ischemic Stroke (AIS) can be successfully handled if it is noticed early in the prehospital setting and immediately diagnosed in the emergency department (ED). The coronavirus pandemic has altered the way health care is delivered and has had a profound impact on healthcare delivery. The effects could include prioritizing the prevention of COVID-19 spread, which could result in the discontinuation or deferral of non-COVID-19 care. We used the National Emergency Medical Service Command Support System, a register of medical interventions performed by emergency medical services (EMS) in Poland, to assess the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic across the Masovian Voivodeship on suspected stroke patients' baseline characteristics, prehospital vital parameters, clinical and neurological status, emergency procedures performed on the prehospital phase and EMS processing times. Between 1 April 2019 and 30 April 2021, the study population included 18,922 adult suspected stroke patients who were treated by EMS teams, with 18,641 admitted to the emergency departments. The overall number of suspected stroke patients treated by EMS remained unchanged during COVID-19 compared to the pre-COVID-19 period; however, the average time from call to hospital admission increased by 15 min.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy
10.
J Clin Med ; 11(5)2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732089

ABSTRACT

Arrhythmias (ARs) are potential cardiovascular complication of COVID-19 but may also have a prognostic role. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and impact of cardiac ARs in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. All-comer patients admitted to the emergency department of Modena University Hospital from 16 March to 31 December 2020 and diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia infection were included in the study. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Out of 902 patients, 637 (70.6%) presented a baseline 12-lead ECG registration; of these, 122 (19.2%) were diagnosed with ARs. Atrial fibrillation (AF, 40.2%) was the most frequent AR detected. The primary endpoint (30-day mortality) occurred in 33.6% (p < 0.001). AR-patients presented an almost 3-fold risk of mortality compared to non-AR-patients at 30d (Adj. OR = 2.8, 95%CI: 1.8-4.3, p < 0.001). After adjustment for significant baseline characteristics selected by a stepwise backward selection, AR-patients remained at increased risk of mortality (Adj. HR = 2.0, 95%CI: 1.9-2.3, p < 0.001). Sub-group analysis revealed that among ARs patients, those with AF at admission presented the highest risk of 30-day mortality (Adj. HR = 3.1, 95%CI: 2.0-4.9, p < 0.001). In conclusion, ARs are a quite common manifestation in COVID-19 patients, who are burdened by even worse prognosis. AR patients with AF presented the highest risk of mortality; thus, these patients may benefit from a more aggressive secondary preventive therapy and a closer follow up.

11.
Biology (Basel) ; 11(2)2022 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700581

ABSTRACT

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Patients with pre-existing CAD were shown to have a more severe course of COVID-19, but this association has not been clarified. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the association between CAD and COVID-19 outcomes. We searched Scopus, Medline (PubMed), Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane databases up to 2 November 2021. There were 62 studies with a total population of 49,286 patients included in the meta-analysis. CAD occurrence in survivor vs. non-survivor groups varied and amounted to 9.2% vs. 22.9%, respectively (OR = 0.33; 95%CI: 0.29 to 0.39; I2 = 70%; p < 0.001). CAD was also associated with increased severity of COVID-19 disease and was (10.8% vs. 5.6%, respectively, for severe vs. non-severe groups (OR = 2.28; 95%CI: 1.59 to 3.27; I2 = 72%; p < 0.001). The role of history of CAD in mortality and severe condition in COVID-19 presents itself as prominent-although a risk of bias in retrospective trials needs to be assessed, in case of our meta-analysis the statistically significant results when it comes to higher mortality among patients with CAD compared to non-CAD patients, a more severe condition observed in patients with CAD, and a visibly more frequent admission to intensive care unit in patients with CAD, it seems that an incidence of cardiovascular events plays a role in COVID-19 prognosis.

12.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319443

ABSTRACT

Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is proven to be efficient in a selected critically ill patient population and is showing promising results in refractory hypoxemia in the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, it necessitates specialized clinicians and advanced technological resources. While COVID-19 is an ongoing global emergency, there is no evidence-based practice in preparedness. This article proposes an innovative and optimized nursing care protocol, the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), that increase safety, and prevents overuse of personal protective equipment (PPE) without interfering with therapy during ECMO in COVID-19 patients. Methods: : A high-fidelity simulation scenario was developed. It included practicing safe and proper PPE donning and doffing during work organization, ECMO cannulation and ECMO-related procedures, and routine daily nursing care and management of patients on ECMO over nine hours. Results: : Results were collected in three parts – proposal of nursing standardized operating procedures. They provide including work organization, work load references, competences and infrastructural conditions. Additionally, the cannulation equipment checklist proposal and daily routine nursing algorithm with other procedures during extracorporeal support were created. Conclusions: : High-fidelity medical simulation can play an important role in staff training, improvement in previously gained proficiency, and development of optimal SOP for nursing care and management during ECMO in patients with COVID-19. Optimal SOPs may further guide multidisciplinary teams including intensive care units and interventional departments.

13.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 122-126, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638161

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is still the gold standard of airway management, but in cases of sudden cardiac arrest in patients with suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection, ETI is associated with risks for both the patient and the medical personnel. We hypothesized that the Vie Scope® is more useful for endotracheal intubation of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cardiac arrest patients than the conventional laryngoscope with Macintosh blade when operators are wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). METHODS: Study was designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial performed by Emergency Medical Services in Poland. Patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis who needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation in prehospital setting were included. Patients under 18 years old or with criteria predictive of impossible intubation under direct laryngoscopy, were excluded. Patients were randomly allocated 1:1 to Vie Scope® versus direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh blade. Study groups were compared on success of intubation attempts, time to intubation, glottis visualization and number of optimization maneuvers. RESULTS: We enrolled 90 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, aged 43-92 years. Compared to the VieScope® laryngoscope, use of the Macintosh laryngoscope required longer times for tracheal intubation with an estimated mean difference of -48 s (95%CI confidence interval [CI], -60.23, -35.77; p < 0.001). Moreover VieScope® improved first attempt success rate, 93.3% vs. 51.1% respectively (odds ratio [OR] = 13.39; 95%CI: 3.62, 49.58; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The use of the Vie Scope® laryngoscope in OHCA patients improved the first attempt success rate, and reduced intubation time compared to Macintosh laryngoscope in paramedics wearing PPE for against aerosol generating procedures. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials registration number NCT04365608.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Airway Management/instrumentation , Airway Management/methods , Airway Management/statistics & numerical data , Allied Health Personnel/standards , Female , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Laryngoscopes/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Resuscitation/instrumentation , Resuscitation/methods , Resuscitation/statistics & numerical data
14.
Gene Rep ; 26: 101505, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638286

ABSTRACT

This review was focused on global data analysis and risk factors associated with morbidity and mortality of coronavirus disease 2019 from different countries, including Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Central Eastern Europe, Egypt, India, Iran, Pakistan, and South Asia, Africa, Turkey and UAE. Male showed higher confirmed and death cases compared to females in most of the countries. In addition, the case fatality ratio (CFR) for males was higher than for females. This gender variation in COVID-19 cases may be due to males' cultural activities, but similar variations in the number of COVID-19 affected males and females globally. Variations in the immune system can illustrate this divergent risk comparatively higher in males than females. The female immune system may have an edge to detect pathogens slightly earlier. In addition, women show comparatively higher innate and adaptive immune responses than men, which might be explained by the high density of immune-related genes in the X chromosome. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 viruses use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to enter the host cell, and men contain higher ACE2 than females. Therefore, males may be more vulnerable to COVID-19 than females. In addition, smoking habit also makes men susceptible to COVID-19. Considering the age-wise distribution, children and older adults were less infected than other age groups and the death rate. On the contrary, more death in the older group may be associated with less immune system function. In addition, most of these group have comorbidities like diabetes, high pressure, low lungs and kidney function, and other chronic diseases. Due to the substantial economic losses and the numerous infected people and deaths, research examining the features of the COVID-19 epidemic is essential to gain insight into mitigating its impact in the future and preparedness for any future epidemics.

15.
Cardiol J ; 28(6): 816-824, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The main purposes of this meta-analysis are to update the information about the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and to investigate the impact of being infected by by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on IHCA outcomes. METHODS: The current meta-analysis is an update and follows the recommendations of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). RESULTS: In analyses, pre- and intra-COVID-19 periods were observed for: shockable rhythms in 17.6% vs. 16.2% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71-1.72; p = 0.65), return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in 47.4% vs. 44.0% (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 0.90-2.07; p = 0.15), 30-day mortality in 59.8% vs. 60.9% (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.75-1.22; p = 0.69) and overall mortality 75.8% vs. 74.7% (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.49-1.28; p = 0.35), respectively. In analyses, SARS-CoV-2 positive and negative patients were observed for: shockable rhythms in 9.6% vs. 19.8% (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.35-0.73; p < 0.001), ROSC in 33.9% vs. 52.1% (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.30-0.73; p < 0.001), 30-day mortality in 77.2% vs. 59.7% (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.28-3.38; p = 0.003) and overall mortality in 94.9% vs. 76.7% (OR: 3.20; 95% CI: 0.98-10.49; p = 0.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite ROSC, 30-day and overall mortality rate were not statistically different in pre- vs. intra-COVID-19 periods, a lower incidence of ROSC and higher 20-day mortality rate were observed in SARS-CoV-2 (+) compared to SARS-CoV-2 (-) patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Heart Arrest , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Cardiol J ; 29(1): 33-43, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the adult population. Herein, is a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of AF/atrial flutter (AFL) on mortality, as well as individual complications in patients hospitalized with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A systematic search of the SCOPUS, Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL and Cochrane databases was performed. The a priori primary outcome of interest was in-hospital mortality. A random-effects model was used to pool study results. RESULTS: Nineteen studies which included 33,296 patients were involved in this meta-analysis. Inhospital mortality for AF/AFL vs. no-AF/AFL groups varied and amounted to 32.8% vs. 14.2%, respectively (risk ratio [RR]: 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.79-2.65; p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality in new onset AF/AFL compared to no-AFAFL was 22.0% vs. 18.8% (RR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.54-2.24; p < 0.001). Intensive care unit (ICU) admission was required for 17.7% of patients with AF/AFL compared to 10.8% for patients without AF/AFL (RR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.04-3.62; p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The present study reveals that AF/AFL is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and worse outcomes in patients with COVID-19 and may be used as a negative prognostic factor in these patients. Patients with AF/AFL are at higher risk of hospitalization in ICU. The presence of AF/AFL in individuals with COVID-19 is associated with higher risk of complications, such as bleeding, acute kidney injury and heart failure. AF/AFL may be associated with unfavorable outcomes due to the hemodynamic compromise of cardiac function itself or hyperinflammatory state typical of these conditions.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Atrial Flutter , COVID-19 , Adult , Atrial Flutter/diagnosis , Atrial Flutter/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Cardiol J ; 28(6): 1001-1002, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572881
20.
J Clin Med ; 10(24)2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554852

ABSTRACT

A safe way of securing the airway with an endotracheal tube is one of the priorities of an advanced cardiovascular life support algorithm for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to compare intubation success rates (ISR) and intubation time (IT) of different laryngoscopes for simulated COVID-19 patients under cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The study was designed as a prospective, randomized, crossover trial. Fifty four active paramedics performed endotracheal intubation with a Macintosh direct laryngoscope (MAC) and McGrath videolaryngoscope (McGrath) with and without personal protective equipment (PPE). Without PPE, ISRs were 87% and 98% for MAC and McGrath, respectively (p = 0.32). ITs were 22.5 s (IQR: 19-26) and 19.5 s (IQR: 17-21) for MAC and McGrath, respectively (p = 0.005). With PPE, first-pass ISR were 30% and 89% with MAC and McGrath, respectively (p < 0.001). The overall success rates were 83% vs. 100% (p = 0.002). Median ITs were 34.0 s (IQR: 29.5-38.5) and 24.8 s (IQR: 21-29) for MAC and McGrath, respectively (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the McGrath videolaryngoscope appears to possess significant advantages over the Macintosh direct laryngoscope when used by paramedics in suspected or confirmed COVID-19 intubation scenarios.

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