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British Journal of Educational Technology ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1831977

ABSTRACT

With COVID‐19 compelling some countries to close their schools, e‐learning has now become the primary mode of learning. Researchers have renewed their interest in users' acceptance of e‐learning via different platforms, given the possibility of different results relative to what was known pre‐pandemic. However, e‐learning still poses issues such as isolation, demotivation and learning attrition, which may be counterbalanced by peer‐to‐peer (P2P) learning. On this basis, this study surveyed 417 Indian students on their acceptance of P2P e‐learning with the extended Technology Acceptance Model. The data analysis confirmed that perceived ease of use was positively associated with the perceived usefulness of and students' attitude towards P2P e‐learning. Credibility was also found to be positively associated with perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitude towards P2P e‐learning. However, the study could not confirm the association between perceived usefulness and attitude towards P2P e‐learning. Additionally, self‐efficacy displayed a weak, but significant association with perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of P2P e‐learning. Internet self‐efficacy was found to have a positive association on the intention to use P2P e‐learning, but not its perceived ease of use. Practitioner notes What is already known about this topic E‐learning which poses issues such as isolation, demotivation and learning attrition became the primary means of education due to the COVID‐19 pandemic. Issues with e‐learning can be counterbalanced by peer‐to‐peer (P2P) learning. There is a renewed interest in user acceptance of e‐learning via different platforms, as the sudden and prolonged shift to e‐learning is revealing different results relative to what was known pre‐pandemic. What this article adds Usage of the extended TAM model to predict users' acceptance of P2P e‐learning platforms during a pandemic. Extending the TAM model with a renewed focus on the importance of self‐efficacy and Internet self‐efficacy in accepting P2P e‐learning during a period of complete remote learning. Extending the TAM model with credibility as a factor: because P2P platforms allow any user to provide answers, students may struggle with choosing which answer to accept. Credibility was discovered to have a positive association with perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and attitude towards P2P platforms. A positive association between perceived usefulness and attitude could not be confirmed—a discovery we consider related to the supplementary way the P2P platform was utilised. Perceived ease of use had a larger association with the intention to use P2P e‐learning than perceived usefulness, thus suggesting that students are more concerned with the ease of finding an answer than the usefulness obtained from it. Implications for practice and/or policy P2P e‐learning platforms should consider means through which an answer's credibility can be increased in order to bolster the ATT towards them. At a macro level, schools should consider the self‐efficacy and Internet self‐efficacy of students to ensure they are able to partake in e‐learning and provide training and resources to those who are lacking. P2P e‐learning platforms need to improve their user interface design and user experience to increase the Perceived ease of use for their users. What is already known about this topic E‐learning which poses issues such as isolation, demotivation and learning attrition became the primary means of education due to the COVID‐19 pandemic. Issues with e‐learning can be counterbalanced by peer‐to‐peer (P2P) learning. There is a renewed interest in user acceptance of e‐learning via different platforms, as the sudden and prolonged shift to e‐learning is revealing different results relative to what was known pre‐pandemic. What this article adds Usage of the extended TAM model to predict users' acceptance of P2P e‐learning platforms during a pandemic. Extending the TAM model with a renewed focus on the importance of self‐efficacy and Internet self‐efficacy in accepting P2P e‐learning during a period of complete remote learning. Extending the TAM model with credibility as a factor: because P2P platforms allow any user to provide answers, students may struggle with choosing which answer to accept. Credibility was discovered to have a positive association with perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and attitude towards P2P platforms. A positive association between perceived usefulness and attitude could not be confirmed—a discovery we consider related to the supplementary way the P2P platform was utilised. Perceived ease of use had a larger association with the intention to use P2P e‐learning than perceived usefulness, thus suggesting that students are more concerned with the ease of finding an answer than the usefulness obtained from it. Implications for practice and/or policy P2P e‐learning platforms should consider means through which an answer's credibility can be increased in order to bolster the ATT towards them. At a macro level, schools should consider the self‐efficacy and Internet self‐efficacy of students to ensure they are able to partake in e‐learning and provide training and resources to those who are lacking. P2P e‐learning platforms need to improve their user interface design and user experience to increase the Perceived ease of use for their users. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of British Journal of Educational Technology is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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