Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 45, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Commentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units (ICUs). Our aim was twofold: (1) to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and (2) determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a large urban academic hospital. We used the validated Ethical Decision-Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) and the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) tools and asked respondents their intention to leave their jobs. We also made comparisons between the different ICU types. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to identify statistically significant associations between the Ethical Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave. RESULTS: Nurses perceived the ethical climate for decision-making as less favorable than physicians (p < 0.05). They also had significantly greater levels of moral distress and higher intention to leave their job rates than physicians. Regarding the ICU types, the Neonatal/Pediatric unit had a significantly higher overall ethical climate score than the Medical and Surgical units (3.54 ± 0.66 vs. 3.43 ± 0.81 vs. 3.30 ± 0.69; respectively; both p ≤ 0.05) and also demonstrated lower moral distress scores (both p < 0.05) and lower "intention to leave" scores compared with both the Medical and Surgical units. The ethical climate and moral distress scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.58, p < 0.001); moral distress and "intention to leave" was positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.001); and ethical climate and "intention to leave" were negatively correlated (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences exist in the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave between nurses and physicians and between the different ICU types. Inspecting the individual factors of the ethical climate and moral distress tools can help hospital leadership target organizational factors that improve interprofessional collaboration, lessening moral distress, decreasing turnover, and improved patient care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Intention , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Job Satisfaction , Morals , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Perfusion ; : 2676591221128237, 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The PREdiction of Survival on ECMO Therapy Score (PRESET-Score) predicts mortality while on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The aim of our study was to assess the association between PRESET-Score and survival in a large COVID-19 VV ECMO cohort. METHODS: This was a single-center retrospective study of COVID-19 VV ECMO patients from 15 March 2020, to 30 November 2021. Univariable and Multivariable analyses were performed to assess patient survival and score differences. RESULTS: A total of 105 patients were included in our analysis with a mean PRESET-Score of 6.74. Overall survival was 65.71%. The mean PRESET-Score was significantly lower in the survivor group (6.03 vs 8.11, p < 0.001). Patients with a PRESET-Score less than or equal to six had improved survival compared to those with a PRESET-Score greater than or equal to 8 (97.7% vs. 32.5%, p < 0.001). In a multivariable logistic regression, a lower PRESET-Score was also predictive of survival (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.75, 4.63, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that lower PRESET scores are associated with improved survival. The utilization of this validated, quantifiable, and objective scoring system to help identify COVID-19 patients with the greatest potential to benefit from VV-ECMO appears feasible. The incorporation of the PRESET-Score into institutional ECMO candidacy guidelines can help insure and improve access of this limited healthcare resource to all critically ill patients.

3.
ASAIO J ; 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018308

ABSTRACT

Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) has been used to treat severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acute respiratory distress syndrome; however, patient selection criteria have evolved throughout the pandemic. In this study, we sought to determine the association of patient mortality with time from positive COVID-19 test and infiltrate on chest radiograph (x-ray) to VV ECMO cannulation. We hypothesized that an increasing duration between a positive COVID-19 test or infiltrates on chest x-ray and cannulation would be associated with increased mortality. This is a single-center retrospective chart review of COVID-19 VV ECMO patients from March 1, 2020 to July 28, 2021. Unadjusted and adjusted multivariate analyses were performed to assess for mortality differences. A total of 93 patients were included in our study. Increased time, in days, from infiltrate on chest x-ray to cannulation was associated with increased mortality in both unadjusted (5-9, P = 0.002) and adjusted regression analyses (odds ratio [OR]: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.22-1.81, P < 0.01). Time from positive test to cannulation was not found to be significant between survivors and nonsurvivors (7.5-11, P = 0.06). Time from infiltrate on chest x-ray to cannulation for VV ECMO should be considered when assessing patient candidacy. Further larger cohort and prospective studies are required.

4.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 36(6): 1648-1655, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991701

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore if atrial arrhythmias are associated with in-hospital mortality in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) patients. DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study. SETTING: Quaternary care academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with respiratory failure requiring VV-ECMO for >24 hours between January 1, 2016, and January 1, 2019. INTERVENTIONS: None, observational study. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Two hundred nineteen VV-ECMO patients were included. Patients were stratified by absence or presence of clinically significant atrial arrhythmias during the VV-ECMO run. Atrial arrhythmias were defined as either atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter that occurred during VV-ECMO and required pharmacologic or electrical intervention. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included a composite of thrombotic events, which included ischemic stroke and on-pump arterial thrombosis. Other objectives of this analysis included characterization of atrial arrhythmia incidence, risk factors, and management. A total of 67 patients (30.5%) experienced new-onset atrial arrhythmias post-ECMO cannulation. Age, male sex, and norepinephrine use were independently associated with atrial arrhythmia development. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the atrial arrhythmia group (38.8% v 19.1%; p = 0.003). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, atrial arrhythmias during VV-ECMO were independently associated with increased odds of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.55; p = 0.03), after controlling for Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction score, acute renal failure, total norepinephrine dose, and total cannulation time. CONCLUSIONS: New-onset atrial arrhythmias are a frequent complication during VV-ECMO and are independently associated with excessive in-hospital mortality. Thus, their presence may serve as an important prognostic tool in this patient population.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Thrombosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Norepinephrine , Retrospective Studies , Thrombosis/etiology
5.
Perfusion ; : 2676591221105603, 2022 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874962

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) has become a support modality for patients with acute respiratory failure refractory to standard therapies. VV ECMO has been increasingly used during the current COVID-19 pandemic for patients with refractory respiratory failure. The object of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of VV ECMO in patients with COVID-19 compared to patients with non-COVID-19 viral infections. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients supported with VV ECMO between 8/2014 and 8/2020 whose etiology of illness was a viral pulmonary infection. The primary outcome of this study was to evaluate in-hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes included length of ECMO course, ventilator duration, hospital length of stay, incidence of adverse events through ECMO course. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients were included (35 COVID-19 vs 54 non-COVID-19). Forty (74%) of the non-COVID-19 patients had influenza virus. Prior to cannulation, COVID-19 patients had longer ventilator duration (3 vs 1 day, p = .003), higher PaCO2 (64 vs 53 mmHg, p = .012), and white blood cell count (14 vs 9 ×103/µL, p = .004). Overall in-hospital mortality was 33.7% (n = 30). COVID-19 patients had a higher mortality (49% vs. 24%, p = .017) when compared to non-COVID-19 patients. COVID-19 survivors had longer median time on ECMO than non-COVID-19 survivors (24.4 vs 16.5 days p = .03) but had a similar hospital length of stay (HLOS) (41 vs 48 Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenationdays p = .33). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients supported with VV ECMO have a higher mortality than non-COVID-19 patients. While COVID-19 survivors had significantly longer VV ECMO runs than non-COVID-19 survivors, HLOS was similar. This data add to a growing body of literature supporting the use of ECMO for potentially reversible causes of respiratory failure.

6.
Perfusion ; : 2676591221097642, 2022 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808004

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the increased demand for veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) during the COVID-19 pandemic, guidelines for patient candidacy have often limited this modality for patients with a body mass index (BMI) less than 40 kg/m2. We hypothesize that COVID-19 VV ECMO patients with at least class III obesity (BMI ≥ 40) have decreased in-hospital mortality when compared to non-COVID-19 and non-class III obese COVID-19 VV ECMO populations. METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective study of COVID-19 VV ECMO patients from January 1, 2014, to November 30, 2021. Our institution used BMI ≥ 40 as part of a multi-disciplinary VV ECMO candidate screening process in COVID-19 patients. BMI criteria were not considered for exclusion criteria in non-COVID-19 patients. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to assess in-hospital mortality differences. RESULTS: A total of 380 patients were included in our analysis: The COVID-19 group had a lower survival rate that was not statistically significant (65.7% vs.74.9%, p = .07). The median BMI between BMI ≥ 40 COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients was not different (44.5 vs 45.5, p = .2). There was no difference in survival between the groups (73.3% vs. 78.5%, p = .58), nor was there a difference in survival between the COVID-19 BMI ≥ 40 and BMI < 40 patients (73.3, 62.7, p= .29). Multivariable logistic regression with the outcome of in-hospital mortality was performed and BMI was not found to be significant (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89, 1.01; p = .92). CONCLUSION: BMI ≥ 40 was not an independent risk factor for decreased in-hospital survival in this cohort of VV ECMO patients at a high-volume center. BMI should not be the sole factor when deciding VV ECMO candidacy in patients with COVID-19.

7.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:111-111, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1638840

ABSTRACT

We hypothesized that the use of VV ECMO in critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2- associated ARDS would result in higher sedation requirements compared to those patients on mechanical ventilation (MV) alone. Patients on VV-ECMO and MV had deeper sedation target (RASS -4 vs -3, p < 0.001), had a longer ICU LOS (39.7 days vs 19.6, p < 0.001) and longer hospital LOS (41.9 days vs 31.4, p=0.03). B Introduction: b Adequate sedation and analgesia are often required to facilitate mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

8.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:102-102, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598107

ABSTRACT

Morbidity and mortality for patients on ECMO is high, presenting an additional set of challenges for patients, families, and caregivers. B Introduction: b Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is instituted for patients with COVID-19 in severe circulatory or respiratory failure as bridge to recovery or destination therapies (device implantation or organ transplantation). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:134-134, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1596457

ABSTRACT

Due to resource scarcity during the pandemic, patient triage and transfer to institutions capable of cannulating and managing ECMO patients becomes important to optimize outcomes. When patients with COVID-19 ARDS fail to improve with invasive mechanical ventilation and conventional therapies, veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) may be considered. B Introduction: b Approximately one third of hospitalized patients with Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(6): 1983-1989, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A life-threatening complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) refractory to conventional management. Venovenous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (VV-ECMO) is used to support patients with ARDS in whom conventional management fails. Scoring systems to predict mortality in VV-ECMO remain unvalidated in COVID-19 ARDS. This report describes a large single-center experience with VV-ECMO in COVID-19 and assesses the utility of standard risk calculators. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospective database of all patients with COVID-19 who underwent VV-ECMO cannulation between March 15 and June 27, 2020 at a single academic center was performed. Demographic, clinical, and ECMO characteristics were collected. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality; survivor and nonsurvivor cohorts were compared by using univariate and bivariate analyses. RESULTS: Forty patients who had COVID-19 and underwent ECMO were identified. Of the 33 patients (82.5%) in whom ECMO had been discontinued at the time of analysis, 18 patients (54.5%) survived to hospital discharge, and 15 (45.5%) died during ECMO. Nonsurvivors presented with a statistically significant higher Prediction of Survival on ECMO Therapy (PRESET)-Score (mean ± SD, 8.33 ± 0.8 vs 6.17 ± 1.8; P = .001). The PRESET score demonstrated accurate mortality prediction. All patients with a PRESET-Score of 6 or lowers survived, and a score of 7 or higher was associated with a dramatic increase in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that favorable outcomes are possible in patients with COVID-19 who undergo ECMO at high-volume centers. This study demonstrated an association between the PRESET-Score and survival in patients with COVID-19 who underwent VV-ECMO. Standard risk calculators may aid in appropriate selection of patients with COVID-19 ARDS for ECMO.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
12.
J Clin Pathol ; 75(8): 564-571, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203980

ABSTRACT

AIMS: While the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic may be contained through vaccination, transfusion of convalescent plasma (CCP) from individuals who recovered from COVID-19 (CCP) is considered an alternative treatment. We investigate if CCP transfusion in patients with severe respiratory failure increases plasma titres of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and improves clinical outcomes. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 (n=34) were consented for CCP transfusion and serial blood draws pretransfusion and post-transfusion. Plasma SARS-CoV-2 antireceptor binding domain (RBD) IgG and IgM titres were measured by ELISA serially, and compared with serial plasma titre levels from control patients (n=68). The primary outcome was survival at 30 days, and secondary outcomes were length of ventilator and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support, length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and in the intensive care unit (ICU). Outcomes were compared with matched control patients (n=34). Kinetics of antibodies and clinical outcomes were compared using LOess regression and ORs, respectively. RESULTS: Prior to CCP transfusion, 74% of patients were anti-RBD seropositive for IgG (median 1:3200), and 81% were anti-RBD IgM seropositive (median 1:320), while 16% were seronegative. The kinetics of antibody titres in CCP recipients were similar to controls. CCP recipients presented with similar survival, duration on ventilatory and/or ECMO support, as well as ICU and hospital LOS compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: CCP transfusion did not increase the kinetics of SARS-CoV2 antibodies and did not result in improved clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19 with severe respiratory failure, suggesting that CCP may not be indicated in this category of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , Blood Component Transfusion , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Plasma , RNA, Viral , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Membranes (Basel) ; 11(5)2021 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201372

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) has several distinctions from traditional acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, patients with refractory respiratory failure may still benefit from veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) support. We report our challenges caring for CARDS patients on VV-ECMO and alterations to traditional management strategies. (2) Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of our institutional strategies for managing patients with COVID-19 who required VV-ECMO in a dedicated airlock biocontainment unit (BCU), from March to June 2020. The data collected included the time course of admission, VV-ECMO run, ventilator length, hospital length of stay, and major events related to bleeding, such as pneumothorax and tracheostomy. The dispensation of sedation agents and trial therapies were obtained from institutional pharmacy tracking. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. (3) Results: Forty COVID-19 patients on VV-ECMO were managed in the BCU during this period, from which 21 survived to discharge and 19 died. The criteria for ECMO initiation was altered for age, body mass index, and neurologic status/cardiac arrest. All cannulations were performed with a bedside ultrasound-guided percutaneous technique. Ventilator and ECMO management were routed in an ultra-lung protective approach, though varied based on clinical setting and provider experience. There was a high incidence of pneumothorax (n = 19). Thirty patients had bedside percutaneous tracheostomy, with more procedural-related bleeding complications than expected. A higher use of sedation was noted. The timing of decannulation was also altered, given the system constraints. A variety of trial therapies were utilized, and their effectiveness is yet to be determined. (4) Conclusions: Even in a high-volume ECMO center, there are challenges in caring for an expanded capacity of patients during a viral respiratory pandemic. Though institutional resources and expertise may vary, it is paramount to proceed with insightful planning, the recognition of challenges, and the dynamic application of lessons learned when facing a surge of critically ill patients.

14.
Membranes (Basel) ; 11(4)2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The most critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may require advanced support modalities, such as veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). A systematic, methodical approach to a respiratory pandemic on a state and institutional level is critical. METHODS: We conducted retrospective review of our institutional response to the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on the creation of a dedicated airlock biocontainment unit (BCU) to treat patients with refractory COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS). Data were collected through conversations with staff on varying levels in the BCU, those leading the effort to make the BCU and hospital incident command system, email communications regarding logistic changes being implemented, and a review of COVID-19 patient census at our institution from March through June 2020. RESULTS: Over 2100 patients were successfully admitted to system hospitals; 29% of these patients required critical care. The response to this respiratory pandemic augmented intensive care physician staffing, created a 70-member nursing team, and increased the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) capability by nearly 200%. During this time period, 40 COVID-19 patients on VV-ECMO were managed in the BCU. Challenges in an airlock unit included communication, scarcity of resources, double-bunking, and maintaining routine care. CONCLUSIONS: Preparing for a surge of critically ill patients during a pandemic can be a daunting task. The implementation of a coordinated, system-level approach can help with the allocation of resources as needed. Focusing on established strengths of hospitals within the system can guide triage based on individual patient needs. The management of ECMO patients is still a specialty care, and a systematic and hospital based approach requiring an ECMO team composed of multiple experienced individuals is paramount during a respiratory viral pandemic.

15.
Anesth Analg ; 132(4): 930-941, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136265

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is associated with hypercoagulability and increased thrombotic risk in critically ill patients. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated whether aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and in-hospital mortality. METHODS: A retrospective, observational cohort study of adult patients admitted with COVID-19 to multiple hospitals in the United States between March 2020 and July 2020 was performed. The primary outcome was the need for mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes were ICU admission and in-hospital mortality. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for study outcomes were calculated using Cox-proportional hazards models after adjustment for the effects of demographics and comorbid conditions. RESULTS: Four hundred twelve patients were included in the study. Three hundred fourteen patients (76.3%) did not receive aspirin, while 98 patients (23.7%) received aspirin within 24 hours of admission or 7 days before admission. Aspirin use had a crude association with less mechanical ventilation (35.7% aspirin versus 48.4% nonaspirin, P = .03) and ICU admission (38.8% aspirin versus 51.0% nonaspirin, P = .04), but no crude association with in-hospital mortality (26.5% aspirin versus 23.2% nonaspirin, P = .51). After adjusting for 8 confounding variables, aspirin use was independently associated with decreased risk of mechanical ventilation (adjusted HR, 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.85, P = .007), ICU admission (adjusted HR, 0.57, 95% CI, 0.38-0.85, P = .005), and in-hospital mortality (adjusted HR, 0.53, 95% CI, 0.31-0.90, P = .02). There were no differences in major bleeding (P = .69) or overt thrombosis (P = .82) between aspirin users and nonaspirin users. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin use may be associated with improved outcomes in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. However, a sufficiently powered randomized controlled trial is needed to assess whether a causal relationship exists between aspirin use and reduced lung injury and mortality in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units , Patient Admission , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
16.
Shock ; 55(6): 742-751, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006210

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a support modality for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) who have failed conventional treatments including low tidal volume ventilation, prone positioning, and neuromuscular blockade. In addition, ECLS can be used for hemodynamic support for patients with cardiogenic shock or following cardiac arrest. Injured patients may also require ECLS support for ARDS and other indications. We review the use of ECLS for ARDS patients, trauma patients, cardiogenic shock patients, and post-cardiac arrest patients. We then describe how these principles are applied in the management of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Indications, predictors, procedural considerations, and post-cannulation management strategies are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Heart Arrest , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Heart Arrest/etiology , Heart Arrest/physiopathology , Heart Arrest/therapy , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
19.
A A Pract ; 14(7): e01236, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601387

ABSTRACT

Critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been observed to be hypercoagulable, but the mechanisms for this remain poorly described. Factor VIII is a procoagulant factor that increases during inflammation and is cleaved by activated protein C. To our knowledge, there is only 1 prior study of factor VIII and functional protein C activity in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Here, we present a case series of 10 critically ill patients with COVID-19 who had severe elevations in factor VIII activity and low normal functional protein C activity, which may have contributed to hypercoagulability.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Factor VIII/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Protein C/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Thrombophilia/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antithrombins/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Ferritins/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , International Normalized Ratio , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prothrombin Time , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL