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1.
Otolaryngol Case Rep ; 21: 100370, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are more than 206 million confirmed cases of Covid-19 infection globally. Nasopharyngeal swab testing is one of the widely used diagnostic methods for the initial diagnosis of such cases. With the growing diagnostic testing capacity, it is expected to observe an increased number of adverse events due to nasopharyngeal testing. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A middle-aged woman presented with unilateral rhinorrhea, started after nasopharyngeal swab test for Covid-19. She had no prior medical issues. Thorough examination and imaging showed the presence of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. CONCLUSION: Nasopharyngeal swab testing may lead to serious complications and taking a brief history might be helpful. Also, patients should be educated on different complications of nasopharyngeal swab testing and their associated symptoms.

2.
Acad Radiol ; 28(12): 1654-1661, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856340

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) remains the gold standard for confirmation of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) despite having many disadvantages. Here, we investigated the diagnostic performance of chest computed tomography (CT) as an alternative to RT-PCR in patients with clinical suspicion of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 27,824 patients with clinical suspicion of COVID-19 infection who underwent unenhanced low-dose chest CT from 20 February, 2020 to 21 May, 2020 were evaluated. Patients were recruited from seven specifically designated hospitals for patients with COVID-19 infection affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. In each hospital, images were interpreted by two independent radiologists. CT findings were considered as positive/negative for COVID-19 infection based on RSNA diagnostic criteria. Then, the correlation between the number of daily positive chest CT scans and number of daily PCR-confirmed cases and COVID-19-related deaths in Tehran province during this three-month period was assessed. The trends of admission rate and patients with positive CT scans were also evaluated. RESULTS: A strong positive correlation between the numbers of daily positive CT scans and daily PCR-confirmed COVID-19 cases (r = 0.913, p < 0.001) was observed. Furthermore, in hospitals located in regions with a lower socioeconomic status, the admission rate and number of positive cases within this three-month period was higher as compared to other hospitals. CONCLUSION: Low-dose chest CT is a safe, rapid and reliable alternative to RT-PCR for the diagnosis of COVID-19 in high-prevalence regions. In addition, our study provides further evidence for considering patients' socioeconomic status as an important risk factor for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
3.
Pol Arch Intern Med ; 130(7-8): 629-634, 2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761202

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Currently, there are known contributing factors but no comprehensive methods for predicting the mortality risk or intensive care unit (ICU) admission in patients with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19). OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore risk factors for mortality and ICU admission in patients with COVID­19, using computed tomography (CT) combined with clinical laboratory data. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID­19 (n = 63) from university hospitals in Tehran, Iran, were included. All patients underwent CT examination. Subsequently, a total CT score and the number of involved lung lobes were calculated and compared against collected laboratory and clinical characteristics. Univariable and multivariable proportional hazard analyses were used to determine the association among CT, laboratory and clinical data, ICU admission, and in­hospital death. RESULTS: By univariable analysis, in­hospital mortality was higher in patients with lower oxygen saturation on admission (below 88%), higher CT scores, and a higher number of lung lobes (more than 4) involved with a diffuse parenchymal pattern. By multivariable analysis, in­hospital mortality was higher in those with oxygen saturation below 88% on admission and a higher number of lung lobes involved with a diffuse parenchymal pattern. The risk of ICU admission was higher in patients with comorbidities (hypertension and ischemic heart disease), arterial oxygen saturation below 88%, and pericardial effusion. CONCLUSIONS: We can identify factors affecting in­hospital death and ICU admission in COVID-19. This can help clinicians to determine which patients are likely to require ICU admission and to inform strategic healthcare planning in critical conditions such as the COVID­19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Distribution , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
4.
Iran. J. Radiol. ; 3(17): 1-7, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-727488

ABSTRACT

Various manifestations may appear in chest computed tomography (CT) scan of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this pictorial review, we present chest CT manifestations of 14 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 disease and various manifestations including ground-glass and consolidative opacities, reticular opacities, halo sign, and other findings.

5.
Biosens Bioelectron ; 165: 112435, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635645

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is the shocking viral pandemics of this year which affected the health, economy, communications, and all aspects of social activities all over the world. Early diagnosis of this viral disease is very important since it can prevent lots of mortalities and care consumption. The functional similarities between COVID-19 and COVID-2 in inducing acute respiratory syndrome lightened our mind to find a diagnostic mechanism based on early traces of mitochondrial ROS overproduction as lung cells' dysfunctions induced by the virus. We designed a simple electrochemical sensor to selectively detect the intensity of ROS in the sputum sample (with a volume of less than 500 µl). Comparing the results of the sensor with clinical diagnostics of more than 140 normal and involved cases resulted in a response calibration with accuracy and sensitivity both 97%. Testing the sensor in more than 4 hospitals shed promising lights in ROS based real-time tracing of COVID-19 from the sputum sample.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biosensing Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Electrochemical Techniques/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Reactive Oxygen Species/analysis , Sputum/virology , Adult , Aged , Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Early Diagnosis , Electrochemical Techniques/instrumentation , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Lung/chemistry , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sputum/chemistry , Young Adult
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