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1.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 9: e42143, 2023 07 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Distributing COVID-19 vaccines to the public was an important task for the governments of each country. Because of various limitations, priority settings for vaccination were determined at the time of mass vaccination. However, trends between vaccine intention and uptake, as well as reasons for getting vaccinated or not getting vaccinated, among these groups were understudied, undermining verification of the legitimacy of priority selection. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to illustrate a trend from prior COVID-19 vaccine intention, when the vaccine was not available, to the actual uptake within 1 year when all residents had access to the vaccine, to illustrate a change of reason for getting vaccinated or not getting vaccinated and to examine whether priority settings predicted subsequent vaccination uptake. METHODS: Prospective cohort, web-based, self-administered surveys were conducted in Japan at 3 time points: February 2021, September to October 2021, and February 2022. In total, 13,555 participants (age: mean 53.1, SD 15.9 years) provided valid responses, with a 52.1% follow-up rate. On the basis of the information obtained in February 2021, we identified 3 types of priority groups: health care workers (n=831), people aged ≥65 years (n=4048), and those aged 18 to 64 years with underlying medical conditions (n=1659). The remaining patients were treated as nonpriority (n=7017). Modified Poisson regression analysis with a robust error estimated the risk ratio for COVID-19 vaccine uptake after adjusting for socioeconomic background, health-seeking behavior, attitude toward vaccines, and COVID-19 infection history. RESULTS: In February 2021, a total of 5182 out of 13,555 (38.23%) respondents expressed their intention to get vaccinated. In February 2022, a total of 1570 out of 13,555 (11.6%) respondents completed the third dose and 10,589 (78.1%) respondents completed the second dose. Prior vaccine intention and subsequent vaccine coverage rates were higher in the priority groups. Protection of themselves and their families from potential infection was the most frequent reason for getting vaccinated, whereas concern about side effects was the most frequent reason for hesitation across the groups. Risk ratios for received, reserved, or intended for vaccination in February 2022 were 1.05 (95% CI 1.03-1.07) for the health care worker group, 1.02 (95% CI 1.005-1.03) for the older adult group, and 1.01 (95% CI 0.999-1.03) for the preexisting conditions group compared with the nonpriority group. Prior vaccine intention and confidence in vaccines were strong predictors of vaccine uptake. CONCLUSIONS: The priority settings at the start of the COVID-19 vaccination program had a significant impact on vaccine coverage after 1 year. The priority group for vaccination achieved higher vaccination coverage in February 2022. There was room for improvement among the nonpriority group. The findings of this study are essential for policy makers in Japan and other countries to develop effective vaccination strategies for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , Aged , Middle Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Prospective Studies , Japan/epidemiology , Mass Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
2.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 28: 10, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before the COVID-19 vaccine became available, many Japanese people were undecided about whether or not to receive them. Their decisions were keys to achieving herd immunity. The impact of the type of information source on the COVID-19 vaccine uptake decision-making process remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between information source usage on COVID-19 and subsequent vaccine uptake status among those who have yet to decide whether to receive vaccines from non-prioritized people for vaccination. METHODS: Prospective cohort online self-administered surveys were conducted in February 2021 (T1), before the start of the mass vaccination program, and September-October 2021 (T2), when the vaccines were available to all citizens. The survey's target population was registered monitors of an Internet research company. Participants who answered "I want to get vaccinated after waiting to see how it goes." at T1 were eligible for analysis. The outcome variable was the COVID-19 vaccine uptake status in T2, and the predictors were 20 types of information sources, categorized based on people (family members, etc.), institutions (governments, etc.), or media (TV news, etc.). Adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression adjusted for possible confounders. RESULTS: The 5,139 respondents, mean age and standard deviation was 42.8 ± 12.5, 55.7% female, were eligible for analysis. 85.7% completed vaccination (including reserved/intended people) in T2. In the multivariate logistic analysis, odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for vaccine uptake were 1.49 (1.18-1.89) for workplaces/schools, 1.81 (1.33-2.47) for LINE, 0.69 (0.55-0.86) for Internet news and 0.62 (0.48-0.82) for video sharing sites. CONCLUSIONS: The type of information source usage played an important role in the decision to vaccinate against COVID-19. Although caution is needed in interpreting the results, obtaining information from workplaces/schools and LINE was influential in promoting immunization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Sources , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19 Vaccines , Prospective Studies , Intention , Japan , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
3.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1087, 2022 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933124

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid introduction of teleworking due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to concerns about increases in cyberbullying (CB) worldwide. However, little is known about workplace CB in non-Western countries. The first objective was to clarify the prevalence and characteristics regarding workplace CB victimization in Japan. The second objective was to demonstrate the psychological outcomes of CB victimization in combination with traditional bullying (TB). METHODS: We conducted an anonymous, cross-sectional, Internet-based survey targeting regular employees in Japan (N = 1200) in January 2021. We investigated CB victimization using the Inventory of Cyberbullying Acts at Work and TB victimization by using the Short Negative Act Questionnaire. Possible explanatory factors for TB/CB victimization were sociodemographic variables, personality trait, chronic occupational stress, organizational climate, and gratitude at work. We also measured psychological distress, insomnia, and loneliness to assess adverse effects of workplace bullying. Two-step cluster analysis was used in determining the patterns combined with TB and CB victimization. Hierarchical binomial logistic regression analysis was used. RESULTS: In total, 8.0% of employees reported experiencing CB on a weekly basis. CB victimization was associated with younger age, managerial position, higher qualitative workload, and active information dissemination via the Internet, and frequency of teleworking. Three clusters based on TB and CB victimization patterns were identified: those who belong to the first cluster suffered neither from TB and CB (81.0%), the second cluster suffered only from TB (14.3%), and the third cluster suffered from both TB and CB (4.8%). The third cluster exhibited higher odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for psychological distress (OR = 12.63, 95% CI = 4.20-38.03), insomnia (OR = 6.26, 95% CI = 2.80-14.01), and loneliness (OR = 3.24, 95% CI = 1.74-6.04) compared to the first cluster. CONCLUSIONS: These findings firstly clarify the prevalence and correlated factors of CB victimization among employees in Japan. Further, we showed that psychological wellbeing can be impaired by the coexistence of TB and CB. Our research could be the first step to develop the effective countermeasures against workplace CB.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cyberbullying , Occupational Stress , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Workplace/psychology
4.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 27(0): 17, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854915

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ibaraki's Amabie-chan is a COVID-19 infection control system unique to Ibaraki prefecture, Japan. It requires residents to register each time they visit events, commercial facilities, and restaurants. The number of registrations has been limited, and its function alerting about people positive for COVID-19 infection seems not to be working. Nevertheless, registration with the system might have some impact on the user's behavior. In the current preliminary survey, the possible impact of Ibaraki's Amabie-chan on infection prevention behavior and fear of COVID-19 was investigated. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based, anonymous, and self-administered survey was conducted at two workplaces in Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki, Japan. The first survey was conducted at one of the workplaces in November 2020, and the second survey, at the other workplace in February 2021. Variables of interest were sex, age group, marital status, employment status, Ibaraki's Amabie-chan use, COVID-19 Contact-Confirming Application use, ten items of infection prevention behaviors, and fear of COVID-19. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: In both surveys, use of Ibaraki's Amabie-chan was significantly associated with COCOA use and with "physical condition management such as body temperature measurement." No association was found with other infection prevention behaviors or with fear of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings did not provide sufficient evidence for the effectiveness of Ibaraki's Amabie-chan in regard to users' infection control behavior. Further detailed study is needed to investigate the effectiveness in terms of infection prevention and the cost-effectiveness of Ibaraki's Amabie-chan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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