Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Viruses ; 14(3)2022 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760849

ABSTRACT

This monocentric, retrospective, two-stage observational study aimed to recognize the risk factors for a poor outcome in patients hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and to develop and validate a risk score that identifies subjects at risk of worsening, death, or both. The data of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first wave of the pandemic were collected and analyzed as a derivation cohort. Variables with predictive properties were used to construct a prognostic score, which was tried out on a validation cohort enrolled during the second wave. The derivation cohort included 494 patients; the median age was 62 and the overall fatality rate was 22.3%. In a multivariable analysis, age, oxygen saturation, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase were independent predictors of death and composed the score. A cutoff value of 3 demonstrated a sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.5%, 68.5%, 47.4% and 97.2% for death, and 84.9%, 84.5%, 79.6% and 87.9% for worsening, respectively. The validation cohort included 415 subjects. The score application showed a Se, Sp, PPV and NPV of 93.4%, 61.6%, 29.5% and 98.1% for death, and 81%, 76.3%, 72.1% and 84.1% for worsening, respectively. We propose a new clinical, easy and reliable score to predict the outcome in hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Thromb Haemost ; 2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730360

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2)-related pneumonia is associated with venous and arterial thrombosis . Aim of the study was to find-out a new score for predicting thrombosis in patients with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We included a cohort of 674 patients affected by SARS-CoV-2, not requiring intensive care units, and followed-up during the hospitalization until discharge. Routinary analyses performed at in-hospital admission included also serum albumin and D-dimer while arterial and venous thromboses were the end-points of the study. RESULTS: During the follow-up thrombotic events 110 were registered; patients with thrombotic events were older and had lower albumin and higher D-dimer, compared to thrombotic event-free ones. On multivariable logistic regression with step by stepwise procedure age, serum albumin, D-dimer, were independently associated with thrombotic events. The linear combination of age, D-dimer, albumin allowed to build-up the ADA score, whose AUC was 0.752 (95% CI, 0.708-0.795). ADA score was internally validated by bootstrap sampling procedure giving an AUC of 0.752 (95% CI: 0.708 - 0.794). CONCLUSIONS: Combination of age, D-dimer, albumin in the ADA score allows identifying SARS-CoV-2 patients at higher risk of thrombotic events.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322020

ABSTRACT

A hypercoagulability state with fatal thrombosis events seems to characterize the clinical worsening of COVID-19 pneumonia. The benefit and safety of anticoagulant doses of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in COVID-19 are still unknown. We evaluated in a retrospective cohort study 257 COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to our COVID-Hospital from February 29, to April 7, 2020. We compared the in-hospital mortality between patients treated with prophylactic or therapeutic doses of LMWH. Of the 257 patients enrolled, 49 (19.1%) died during the hospitalization. Hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients treated with therapeutic doses of LMWH (enoxaparin 70-100 I.U./kg twice daily) (17/126, 13.5%), than in patients treated with prophylactic doses (60-90 I.U./kg once daily) (32/131, 24.4%;χ²=4.98, p = 0.02). In a stratified analysis by ventilation type, the only subgroup of patients who benefited from therapeutic LMWH was that requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (OR=0.099, 95% CI 0.028-0.354, p<0.001). No fatal bleedings were observed. In this retrospective study the treatment with therapeutic LMWH is safe and seems to reduce mortality in COVID-19 patients, especially among those who need noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Authors Daniela Aschieri and Marco Stabile contributed equally to this work.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318409

ABSTRACT

Background: In clinical practice, the striking similarities observed at computed tomography (CT) between the diseases make it difficult to distinguish a COVID-19 pneumonia from a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to Systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study was to identify the main CT features that may help distinguishing SSc-ILD from COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods: This multicentric study included 22 international readers divided in the radiologist group (RAD) and non-radiologist group (nRAD). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study.Findings: Fibrosis inside focal ground glass opacities (GGO) in the upper lobes;fibrosis in the lower lobe GGO;reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONS in the lower lobes (p <0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGO in the lower lobes (p <0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia or SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score weas created which resulted positively associated with the COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity).Interpretation: The CT differential diagnosis between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through the combination our score and the radiologic expertise. If an overlap of both diseases is suspected, the presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest a COVID-19 pneumonia while the presence of fibrosis inside GGO may indicate a SSc-ILD.Funding: No Funding were received for this study.Declaration of Interests: SC reports personal fees from NOVARTIS-SANOFI-LILLY-CELTHER-PFIZER-JANSSEN;MK reports grants and personal fees from Boehringer-Ingelheim, personal fees from Corbus, grants and personal fees from Chugai, grants and personal fees from Ono Pharmeceuticals, personal fees from Tanabe-Mitsubishi, personal fees from Astellas, personal fees from Gilead, personal fees from Mochida;ST reports personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, personal fees from Roche, outside the submitted work;GS reports personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim;CB reports personal fees from Actelion, personal fees from Eli Lilly, grants from European Scleroderma Trial and Research (EUSTAR) group, grants from New Horizon Fellowship, grants from Foundation for Research in Rheumatology (FOREUM), grants from Fondazione Italiana per la Ricerca sull'Artrite (FIRA);CV reports grants and personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, grants and personal fees from F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.;FL reports lectures fee from Roche and from Boehringer- Ingelheim;CPD reports grants and personal fees from GSK, personal fees from Boerhinger Ingelheim, grants from Servier, grants and personal fees from Inventiva, grants and personal fees from Arxx Therapeutics, personal fees from Corbus, personal fees from Sanofi, personal fees from Roche;FL reports grants and personal fees from GSK, personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, personal fees from Orion Pharma, personal fees from AstraZeneca, grants from MSD, personal fees from HIKMA, personal fees from Trudell International, grants and personal fees from Chiesi Farmaceutici, personal fees from Novartis Pharma;MH reports personal fees from Speaking fees from Actelion, Eli lilly and Pfizer;D K reports personal fees from Actelion, grants and personal fees from Bayer, grants and personal fees from Boehringer Ingelhem, personal fees from CSL Behring, grants and personal fees from Horizon, grants from Pfizer, personal fees from Corbus, grants and personal fees from BMS, outside the submitted work;and Dr Khanna is the Chief Medical officer of Eicos Sciences Inc and has s ock options. All the mentioned authors declared previous feed outside the submitted work. All other authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: This retrospective, observational, multicentric, international study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Florence Careggi hospital (protocol number 17104_oss).

5.
Thromb Haemost ; 122(2): 257-266, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is still unclear if patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have different rate, typology, and impact of thrombosis on survival. METHODS: In this multicenter observational cohort study, 1,138 patients, hospitalized for CAP (n = 559) or COVID-19 (n = 579) from seven clinical centers in Italy, were included in the study. Consecutive adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) with confirmed COVID-19-related pneumonia, with or without mechanical ventilation, hospitalized from March 1, 2020 to April 30, 2020, were enrolled. COVID-19 was diagnosed based on the World Health Organization interim guidance. Patients were followed-up until discharge or in-hospital death, registering the occurrence of thrombotic events including ischemic/embolic events. RESULTS: During the in-hospital stay, 11.4% of CAP and 15.5% of COVID-19 patients experienced thrombotic events (p = 0.046). In CAP patients all the events were arterial thromboses, while in COVID-19 patients 8.3% were venous and 7.2% arterial thromboses.During the in-hospital follow-up, 3% of CAP patients and 17% of COVID-19 patients died (p < 0.001). The highest mortality rate was found among COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (47.6 vs. 13.4% in thrombotic-event-free patients; p < 0.001). In CAP, 13.8% of patients experiencing thrombotic events died versus 1.8% of thrombotic event-free ones (p < 0.001). A multivariable Cox-regression analysis confirmed a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-3.3; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Compared with CAP, COVID-19 is characterized by a higher burden of thrombotic events, different thrombosis typology and higher risk of thrombosis-related in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/mortality , Risk Factors , Survival Analysis , Thrombosis/mortality
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20964, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483147

ABSTRACT

Multicentre, retrospective cohort study with multivariable Cox proportional-hazards modelling and survival-time inverse-probability-weighting, evaluating the impact of different treatments on survival of proven COVID-19 patients admitted to two Hospitals in the province of Piacenza, Italy. Use of tocilizumab and of high doses of low molecular weight heparin, but not of antivirals (either alone or in combination), azithromycin, and any corticosteroid, was independently associated with lower mortality. Our results support further clinical evaluation of high doses of low molecular weight heparin and tocilizumab as COVID-19 therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heparin/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Aged , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Probability , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344395

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: HCV shows complex interactions with lipid metabolism. Our aim was to examine total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) changes in HIV/HCV coinfected patients, after achieving sustained virological response (SVR), according to different HCV genotypes and specific antiretroviral use. METHODS: HIV/HCV coinfected patients, enrolled in the ICONA and HepaICONA cohorts, who achieved DAA-driven SVR were included. Paired t-tests were used to examine whether the pre- and post-SVR laboratory value variations were significantly different from zero. ANCOVA regression models were employed to estimate the causal effect of SVR and of PI/r use on lipid changes. The interaction between the effect of eradication and HCV genotype was formally tested. RESULTS: six hundred and ninety-nine HIV/HCV coinfected patients were enrolled. After HCV eradication, a significant improvement in liver function occurred, with a significant decrease in AST, ALT, GGT, and total plasmatic bilirubin. TC and LDL-C significantly increased by 21.4 mg/dL and 22.4 mg/dL, respectively (p < 0.001), after SVR, whereas there was no evidence for a change in HDL-C (p = 0.45) and triglycerides (p = 0.49). Notably, the TC and LDL-C increase was higher for participants who were receiving darunavir/ritonavir, and the TC showed a more pronounced increase among HCV genotype 3 patients (interaction-p value = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: complex and rapid changes in TC and LDL-C levels, modulated by HCV genotype and PI/r-based ART combinations, occurred in HIV/HCV coinfected patients after SVR. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical impact of these changes on the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
Disease Eradication/statistics & numerical data , HIV Infections/virology , Hepacivirus/genetics , Hepatitis C/prevention & control , Lipid Metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cholesterol/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Cohort Studies , Female , Genotype , Hepacivirus/classification , Hepacivirus/drug effects , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Sustained Virologic Response
8.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 61(4): 1600-1609, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the main CT features that may help in distinguishing a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to SSc from COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This multicentric study included 22 international readers grouped into a radiologist group (RADs) and a non-radiologist group (nRADs). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study. RESULTS: Fibrosis inside focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in the upper lobes; fibrosis in the lower lobe GGOs; reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGOs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score was created that was positively associated with COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). CONCLUSION: CT diagnosis differentiating between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through a combination of the proposed score and radiologic expertise. The presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest COVID-19 pneumonia, while the presence of fibrosis inside GGOs may indicate SSc-ILD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Scleroderma, Systemic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Fibrosis , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/complications , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnostic imaging , Scleroderma, Systemic/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Autoimmun Rev ; 20(10): 102899, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316386

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To review similarities between COVID-19 and systemic sclerosis (SSc) early vasculopathy to provide novel insights into both diseases. METHODS: A narrative review of the literature supplemented with expert opinion. RESULTS: There is clear evidence that the endothelium is at the centre stage in SSc and COVID-19, with endothelial cell activation/injury and dysfunction creating the crucial evolving step in the pathogenesis of both diseases. The angiotensin system has also been implicated in the early stages of both COVID-19 and SSc. Autoptic studies provide novel insights into the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the endothelium. Normal endothelium and endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 and SSc are discussed. It is debated whether SARS-CoV-2 infection triggers autoimmunity with production of autoantibodies which is of mechanistic interest because other viral illnesses are potentially involved in endothelial dysfunction and in SSc pathogenesis. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is due to a direct assault of SARS-CoV-2 on the vascular system as an acute infection, whereas SSc remains a chronic/sub-acute autoimmune disease of largely unknown etiology Further study and exploration of the SARS-CoV-2 pathogenic mechanisms might provide further useful milestones in the understanding of the early SSc pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Scleroderma, Systemic , Autoantibodies , Autoimmunity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnosis
10.
Front Oncol ; 10: 582901, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084178

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects humans through the angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) receptor expressed on many cells, including lymphocytes. In Covid-19 patients IL-6 is overexpressed, and hyperactivated plasmacytoid lymphocytes are detected in peripheral blood film. We hypothesize that, due to the unpredictable interaction between the new virus and the B cell lineage of infected patients, a cascade of out of control events can ensue, capable of determining unexpected pathologic disorders involving such lineage. Here we report two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and two cases of B-cell hematological malignancies developed or reactivated during acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. The temporal relationship of the events may suggest a potential causal relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the hematopoietic disorders. We suggest that special attention should be paid to COVID-19 patients with underlining B cell lineage disorders.

11.
Acta Biomed ; 91(4): e2020144, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Testing represents one of the main pillars of public health response to SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic. This paper shows how accuracy and utility of testing programs depend not just on the type of tests, but on the context as well. METHODS: We describe the testing methods that have been developed and the possible testing strategies; then, we focus on two possible methods of population-wide testing, i.e., pooled testing and testing with rapid antigen tests. We show the accuracy of split-pooling method and how, in different pre-test probability scenarios, the positive and negative predictive values vary using rapid antigen tests. RESULTS: Split-pooling, followed by retesting of negative results, shows a higher sensitivity than individual testing and requires fewer tests. In case of low pre-test probability, a negative result with antigen test could allow to rule out the infection, while, in case of a positive result, a confirmatory molecular test would be necessary. CONCLUSIONS: Test performance alone is not enough to properly choose which test to use; goals and context of the testing program are essential. We advocate the use of pooled strategies when planning population-wide screening, and the weekly use of rapid tests for close periodic monitoring in low-prevalence populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , Reproducibility of Results
12.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(2): 263-270, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Piacenza is the closest city to the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cluster in Italy and has the highest national COVID-19 death rates per population. The objective of this study is to present characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to medical departments of the Hospital of Piacenza during the first wave of the epidemic. METHODS: A total of 218 patients with confirmed or suspect COVID-19 and severe pneumonia were included from February 21st to May 15th, 2020. Routinely-collected clinical and laboratory data were retrospectively retrieved from electronic medical files. A Cox proportional-hazards model was fit to assess the association of treatment and other variables with death. RESULTS: Median age of patients was 68 years; 150 patients (69%) had comorbidities, mainly hypertension (107, 49%). Overall, 185 (85%) patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) on admission, including 103 (47%) with moderate or severe ARDS. Chest computed tomography scan showed bilateral disease in 201 (98%) and extensive lung involvement in 79 (50%) patients. Most patients received antiviral treatment (187, 86%) and corticosteroids (134, 61%). All patients received respiratory support and 64 (29%) were admitted to intensive care unit. As of June 30th, 100 patients (46%) died, 109 patients (50%) were discharged, and 9 patients (4%) were still hospitalized. In multivariable Cox analysis, age above 65 years, having more than one comorbidity, severe ARDS, low platelet counts, and high LDH levels at admission were associated with mortality, while having diarrhea at admission was associated with survival. The use of antivirals or corticosteroids was not associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: Overall case fatality rates were high and associated with comorbidities, extensive lung involvement, ARDS at admission, and advanced age. The use of antivirals was not associated with increased survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
13.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 79(6): 724-726, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155085

ABSTRACT

Due to the frequent presence of interstitial lung disease and widespread use of immunosuppressive treatment, systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients may be considered at risk for a more severe disease course and higher mortality when they develop Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Coronavirus - 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus infection. Therefore, with World Scleroderma Foundation endorsement, experts from different specialties including rheumatology, virology and clinical immunology gathered virtually to answer to the main practical clinical questions regarding SARS-CoV-2 infection coming from both patients and physicians. This preliminary advice is aligned with other national and international recommendations, adapted for SSc patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Scleroderma, Systemic/therapy , Scleroderma, Systemic/virology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/immunology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/epidemiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL