Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 16 de 16
Filter
2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
4.
Radiol Cardiothorac Imaging ; 2(2): e200140, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155980

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presents an unprecedented challenge to the health care systems of the world. In Singapore, early experiences of the radiology community on managing this pandemic was shaped by lessons learned from the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in 2003. This article surveys the operational responses of radiology departments from six public hospitals in Singapore. © RSNA, 2020.

5.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(2): 139-145, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to study anxiety and burnout among Division of Radiological Sciences (RADSC) staff during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify potential risk and protective factors. These outcomes were compared with non-RADSC staff. METHODS: A cross-sectional online study was conducted between 12 March and 20 July 2020 in the largest public tertiary hospital receiving COVID-19 cases. Burnout and anxiety were assessed with the Physician Work-Life Scale and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, respectively. Workplace factors were examined as potential risk and protective factors using multivariable ordinary least squares regression analyses, adjusting for pertinent demographic characteristics. RESULTS: RADSC staff (n = 180) and non-RADSC staff (n = 1458) demonstrated moderate-to-severe anxiety rates of 6.7 and 13.2 % and burnout rates of 17.8 and 23.9 %, respectively. RADSC staff reported significantly lower anxiety (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 3.7 vs 4.9 ± 4.5; P-value < 0.05), burnout (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 0.7 vs 2.1 ± 0.8; P-value < 0.01), increased teamwork (82.2% vs 74.1%; P-value < 0.05) and fewer night shifts (36.7% vs 41.1%; P-value < 0.01). Among RADSC staff, higher job dedication was associated with lower anxiety (b (95% CI) = -0.28 (-0.45, -0.11)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = -0.07 (-0.11,-0.04)), while longer than usual working hours was associated with increased anxiety (b (95% CI) = 1.42 (0.36, 2.45)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = 0.28 (0.09, 0.48)). CONCLUSIONS: A proportion of RADSC staff reported significant burnout and anxiety, although less compared to the larger hospital cohort. Measures to prevent longer than usual work hours and increase feelings of enthusiasm and pride in one's job may further reduce the prevalence of anxiety problems and burnout in radiology departments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
6.
BJR Open ; 2(1): 20200045, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013192

ABSTRACT

In this opinion piece derived from a webinar organized by the Radiological Society of North America and conducted in the spring of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, leaders from three large North American and Asian academic radiology programs review the strategies employed at their respective institutions to address the impact of the pandemic on their departments. In the first segment, the author describes the approach taken in the radiology department at an 1800-bed Asian hospital system which focuses on the creation of capacity to accommodate over 5000 COVID-19 patients in early 2020, the sustaining of services during the surge, and the development of adaptive mechanisms to address future surges and pandemics. In the second segment, a large southwestern medical system addresses the creation of a long-term strategy to provide imaging services safely for staff and patients while simultaneously utilizing technology to maintain interprofessional connections. The final segment describes how a large multifacility health-care enterprise in the Pacific Northwest of the United States is developing strategies to successfully reemerge from the forced reduction in imaging services experienced during the COVID-19 surge in early 2020.

7.
Radiology ; 299(1): E187-E192, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007281

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has spread across the world since December 2019, infecting 100 million and killing millions. The impact on health care institutions during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has been considerable, with exhaustion of institutional and personal protective equipment resources during local outbreaks and crushing financial consequences for many institutions. Establishing adaptive principles of leadership is necessary during crises, fostering quick decision-making and workflow modifications, while a rapid review of data must determine necessary course corrections. This report describes concepts of crisis leadership teams that can help maximize their effectiveness during the current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Leadership , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , North America , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
8.
Radiology ; 299(1): E193-E203, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963853

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has challenged and changed health care systems around the world. There has been a heterogeneity of disease burden, health care resources, and nonimaging testing availability, both geographically and over time. In parallel, there has been a continued increase in understanding how the disease affects patients, effectiveness of therapeutic options, and factors that modulate transmission risk. In this report, radiology experts in representative countries from around the world share insights gained from local experience. These insights provide a guidepost to help address management challenges as cases continue to rise in many parts of the world and suggest modifications in workflow that are likely to continue after this pandemic subsides.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Radiology , Humans , Internationality , North America , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
9.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 214(6): 1206-1210, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE. This article shares the ground operational perspective of how a tertiary hospital radiology department in Singapore is responding to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic. This same department was also deeply impacted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003. CONCLUSION. Though similar to SARS, the COVID-19 outbreak has several differences. We share how lessons from 2003 are applied and modified in our ongoing operational response to this evolving novel pathogen.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epidemics , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/standards , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Singapore/epidemiology
10.
Eur Radiol ; 31(1): 468-474, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710138

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak poses a serious public health risk. To date, the disease has affected almost all countries in the world. The enormous scale of the outbreak and the relative lack of knowledge and information regarding a new virus, as well as the unpredictability of events, make it challenging for leadership teams to respond. This paper shares how we have reconfigured our radiology leadership team into a smaller disease outbreak task force (DOTF) to respond and coordinate all related efforts during this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The DOTF format is modelled after the military with domain groups looking at manpower, intelligence, operations, and logistics matters on a daily basis so that timely decisions can be made and action plans executed promptly. In managing the DOTF, discipline, flexibility, and teamwork are key principles, and these are built upon a strong foundation of focus on infection prevention and control, and patient and staff safety as well as staff well-being. The DOTF has positioned us well to confront the many challenges to date. We believe it will also help us navigate the complex issues that will arise with future surges in cases and in formulating strategies to manage exit from the present and future lockdowns. KEY POINTS: • In a pandemic, regular and directed meetings by a smaller leadership core group are required, for prompt decision making and execution of action plans. • The military format, with domain groups to look at manpower, intelligence, operations, and logistics matters, is useful in managing a pandemic. • Discipline, flexibility, and teamwork with strong focus on infection prevention and control, and patient and staff safety as well as staff well-being are key principles for leadership teams managing a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Infection Control , Leadership , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Decision-Making , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel Administration, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
13.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 43(9): 1420-1422, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324212
14.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 43(6): 827-836, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125396

ABSTRACT

With astonishing speed, COVID-19 has become a global pandemic. As it is uncertain when the pandemic will be controlled, it is crucial for procedurists of all stripes to be familiar and confident in performing procedures for COVID-19 patients to prevent intra-hospital infection. In this article, we will detail our approach on how to perform interventional procedures for COVID-19 patients at the bedside in the isolation room and with the patient transferred to the interventional radiology centre. These workflows have been developed in conjunction with multiple other stakeholders within our hospital, drawing from valuable lessons we have learnt from the SARS outbreak of 2003.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiology, Interventional/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 31(6): 869-875, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-42072

ABSTRACT

This paper describes country-wide special measures undertaken for interventional radiology staff during the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although each interventional radiology service around the world faces unique challenges, the principles outlined in this article will be useful when designing or strengthening individual practices and integrating them within wider hospital and national measures. Moving beyond the current outbreak, these measures will be useful for any future infectious diseases which are likely to arise.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology, Interventional/methods , COVID-19 , Humans , Singapore
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL