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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 765581, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952750

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak triggered a massive spread of unverified news on social media and has become a source of rumors. This paper studies the impact of a virtual rumor control center (RCC) on Weibo user behavior. The collected COVID-19 breaking news stories were divided into positive, negative, and neutral categories, while the moderating effect model was used to analyze the influence of anti-rumor on user behavior (forwarding, liking, and commenting). Our research found that rumor refuting does not directly affect user behavior but does have an indirect moderating effect. Rumor refuting has a profound impact on user forwarding behavior in cases of positive and negative news. Specifically, when the epidemic becomes more serious, the role of rumor refuting becomes critical, and vice versa. Refuting rumors reduces user willingness to forward positive or negative news, with more impact on negative news. Time lag analysis shows a significant moderation of unverified news within 72 h of refuting rumors but indicated an apparent weakening trend over time. Furthermore, we discovered non-linear feature and counter-cyclical phenomena in the moderating effect of rumor refutation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Social Networking
2.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(6): 541, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243286

ABSTRACT

More and more patients suffered from Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have got recovery gradually due to suitable intervention. Increasing data mainly studies the clinical characteristics of recovered COVID-19 patients, and their molecular changes especially proteome changes also play the same important role in understanding of biological characteristics of recovered COVID-19 patients as clinical characteristics do. In our study, we reported the whole lung-ground glass-CT value-average of mild/severe recovered patients 3 months after discharge without underlying diseases was significantly lower than that of healthy subjects. Then we isolated the extracellular vesicles (EVs) of plasma from 19 healthy subjects and 67 recovered COVID-19 patients. Mass Spectrometry was used to catalogue the proteins of these EVs compared to a defined group of controls. Identified 174 proteins were differentially expressed in the EVs of COVID-19 patients compared with healthy subjects, which involved in lipid metabolic process, response to cellular, and response to stress oxygen-containing compound. Besides, we identified several protein of plasma EVs in recovered patients associated with coagulation activity, inflammatory reaction, immune response, and low organ function. In addition, proteins correlating with clinical index such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also detected. Moreover, we also identified many unique or characteristic associations found in the recovered COVID-19 patients, which especially involved the kidney, serum electrolyte levels, and inflammation functions. This finding suggests that monitoring the situation of recovered patients might be useful, especially the indexes of coagulation, inflammation, immunity, and organ function, which can prevent bleeding, reinfection and organ dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Convalescence , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Extracellular Vesicles/pathology , Female , Humans , Lipids/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Proteins/metabolism , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Bioorg Chem ; 104: 104257, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oseltamivir is a first-line antiviral drug, especially in primary hospitals. During the ongoing outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most patients with COVID-19 who are symptomatic have used oseltamivir. Considering its popular and important role as an antiviral drug, it is necessary to evaluate oseltamivir in the treatment of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of oseltamivir against COVID-19. METHODS: Swiss-model was used to construct the structure of the N-terminal RNA-binding domain (NRBD) of the nucleoprotein (NC), papain-like protease (PLpro), and RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRp) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). TM-align program was performed to compare the structure of the viral proteins with the structure of the neuraminidase of influenza A. Molecular docking was used to analyze the theoretical possibility of effective binding of oseltamivir with the active centers of the viral proteins. In vitro study was used to evaluate the antiviral efficiency of oseltamivir against SARS-CoV-2. By clinical case analysis, we statistically evaluated whether the history of oseltamivir use influenced the progression of the disease. RESULTS: The structures of NRBD, PLpro, and RdRp were built successfully. The results from TM-align suggested that the S protein, NRBD, 3C-like protease (3CLpro), PLPrO, and RdRp were structurally similar to the influenza A neuraminidase, with TM-scores of 0.30077, 0.19254, 0.28766, 0.30666, and 0.34047, respectively. Interestingly, the active center of 3CL pro was found to be similar to the active center from the neuraminidase of influenza A. Through an analysis of molecular docking, we discovered that oseltamivir carboxylic acid was more favorable to bind to the active site of 3CLpro effectively, but its inhibitory effect was not strong compared with the positive group. Finally, we used in vitro study and retrospective case analysis to verify our speculations. We found that oseltamivir is ineffective against SARS-CoV-2 in vitro study and the clinical use of oseltamivir did not improve the patients' symptoms and signs and did not slow the disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: We consider that oseltamivir isn't suitable for the treatment of COVID-19. During the outbreak of novel coronavirus, when oseltamivir is not effective for the patients after they take it, health workers should be highly vigilant about the possibility of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Catalytic Domain , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/metabolism , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Docking Simulation , Oseltamivir/chemistry , Oseltamivir/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , Vero Cells
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(5): e208297, 2020 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-186546

ABSTRACT

Importance: Sustained spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has happened in major US cities. Capacity needs in cities in China could inform the planning of local health care resources. Objectives: To describe and compare the intensive care unit (ICU) and inpatient bed needs for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in 2 cities in China to estimate the peak ICU bed needs in US cities if an outbreak equivalent to that in Wuhan occurs. Design, Setting, and Participants: This comparative effectiveness study analyzed the confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wuhan and Guangzhou, China, from January 10 to February 29, 2020. Exposures: Timing of disease control measures relative to timing of SARS-CoV-2 community spread. Main Outcomes and Measures: Number of critical and severe patient-days and peak number of patients with critical and severe illness during the study period. Results: In Wuhan, strict disease control measures were implemented 6 weeks after sustained local transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Between January 10 and February 29, 2020, patients with COVID-19 accounted for a median (interquartile range) of 429 (25-1143) patients in the ICU and 1521 (111-7202) inpatients with serious illness each day. During the epidemic peak, 19 425 patients (24.5 per 10 000 adults) were hospitalized, 9689 (12.2 per 10 000 adults) were considered in serious condition, and 2087 (2.6 per 10 000 adults) needed critical care per day. In Guangzhou, strict disease control measures were implemented within 1 week of case importation. Between January 24 and February 29, COVID-19 accounted for a median (interquartile range) of 9 (7-12) patients in the ICU and 17 (15-26) inpatients with serious illness each day. During the epidemic peak, 15 patients were in critical condition and 38 were classified as having serious illness. The projected number of prevalent critically ill patients at the peak of a Wuhan-like outbreak in US cities was estimated to range from 2.2 to 4.4 per 10 000 adults, depending on differences in age distribution and comorbidity (ie, hypertension) prevalence. Conclusions and Relevance: Even after the lockdown of Wuhan on January 23, the number of patients with serious COVID-19 illness continued to rise, exceeding local hospitalization and ICU capacities for at least a month. Plans are urgently needed to mitigate the consequences of COVID-19 outbreaks on the local health care systems in US cities.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospital Bed Capacity , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cities , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Epidemics , Forecasting , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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