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1.
Front Microbiol ; 12: 777862, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760241

ABSTRACT

Soil microorganisms play key roles in biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. However, whether the responses of microbial community with stand development differed in rhizosphere and bulk soils remains unknown. We collected rhizosphere and bulk soil in Chinese fir plantations with different stand ages (7a, 15a, 24a, and 34a) in subtropical China, and determined bacterial and fungal community variation via high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that soil bacterial, but not fungal, community diversity significantly differed among stand ages and between rhizosphere and bulk soils (p < 0.05). The differences in Shannon-Wiener and Simpson's indices between rhizosphere and bulk soil varied with stand age, with significant higher soil bacterial diversity in rhizosphere than bulk soils in 7a and 34a plantations (p < 0.05), but there were no significant difference in soil bacterial diversity between rhizosphere and bulk soils in 15a and 24a plantations (p > 0.05). Soil microbial community composition varied significantly with stand age but not between the rhizosphere and bulk soil. The dominant bacterial phyla at all ages were Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria, while the dominant fungal phyla were Ascomycota and Basidiomycota in both rhizosphere and bulk soil. They showed inconsistent distribution patterns along stand age gradient (7-34a) in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, suggesting distinct ecological strategy (r-strategist vs. k-strategist) of different microbial taxa, as well as changes in the microenvironment (i.e., nutrient stoichiometry and root exudates). Moreover, bacterial and fungal community composition in rhizosphere and bulk soil were governed by distinct driving factors. TP and NH4 +-N are the two most important factors regulating bacterial and fungal community structure in rhizosphere soil, while pH and NO3 --N, DON, and TN were driving factors for bacterial and fungal community structure in bulk soil, respectively. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the changes in microbial diversity and composition were more obvious along stand age gradients than between sampling locations (rhizosphere vs. bulk soil) in Chinese fir plantations.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325267

ABSTRACT

Objective: In the battle against COVID-19, most medical resources in China have been directed to infected patients in Wuhan. Thus, patients with hepatobiliary pancreatic tumors who are not suffering from COVID-19 are often not given timely and effective anti-cancer treatments. In this study, we aimed to describe clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic oncology from our department, which retained normal working during the COVID-19 epidemic. We also sought to formulate a set of standardized hospitalization and treatment processes. Methods: : A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted involving patients hospitalized from February 1, 2020, to February 29, 2020 (Return to work after the Spring Festival), at our Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgical Oncology. Results: : The study included 92 patients from 12 provinces in the north of China who underwent surgical resection at our Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgical Oncology during the COVID-19 epidemic. Robotic surgery was performed on 82% (75/92) of patients, while the rest underwent laparoscopic (2/92) and open surgery (15/92). Eighty-six patients had malignant tumor, and six had emergency benign diseases. Only five patients had severe pancreatic fistula, and three had biliary fistula after operation. Conclusions: : The standardized hospitalization and treatment processes described in this study could prevent cross-infection of patients and still ensure timely treatment of patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. These study findings will guide the management of surgical oncology departments and treatment of patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic oncology during serious epidemics.

3.
Cureus ; 13(10): e19156, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513131

ABSTRACT

Background National guidance stipulates the essential components of a safe handover. Shift-based work and the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased turnover and re-deployment of staff into new clinical areas, creating challenges in delivering effective handovers. Aim The aim of this quality improvement project (QIP) was to improve adherence to a local standardised handover proforma to improve the quality and consistency of handovers. Methods Handovers were assessed by measuring the completion rates of the essential components of a safe handover as outlined in the national guidance. Data were collected from an electronic handover system which follows the Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendations (SBAR) structure, and percentage completion rates obtained for each component assessed. Following baseline measurement, four Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles were completed between August 2020 and February 2021 across two junior doctor rotations and during a COVID surge rota. Results A total of 710 handovers were assessed across the four PDSA cycles. There were overall improvements in the percentage completion rates of each component compared to baseline: Under 'Situation', admission dates increased by 13.7%, estimated discharge date by 33.3% and 100% completion rate maintained for the presenting complaint. Under 'Background', past medical history remained static, with a 12.1% increase in documentation of a social history. Under 'Assessment', escalation status increased by 335%, issues list by 242% and important updates by 35.2%. Under 'Recommendations', completion rate for plans was maintained at 100%. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated an overall improvement in the majority of components of the handover proforma. Challenges remain with the rotation of junior doctors through different specialties leading to a loss of institutional knowledge and reduced longevity of the intervention's effect, exacerbated by the introduction of the COVID surge rota. A long-lasting improvement may require a shift to a completely electronic patient records system (ePR) which incorporates a handover tool.

4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(9): e24604, 2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114903

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Mortality of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was high. Aims to examine whether time from symptoms onset to intensive care unit (ICU) admission affects incidence of extra-pulmonary complications and prognosis in order to provide a new insight for reducing the mortality. A single-centered, retrospective, observational study investigated 45 critically ill patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in ICU of The Third People's Hospital of Yichang from January 17 to March 29, 2020. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to time from symptoms onset to ICU admission (>7 and ≤7 days) and into 2 groups according to prognosis (survivors and non-survivors). Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics and treatment data were studied. Compared with patients who admitted to the ICU since symptoms onset ≤7 days (55.6%), patients who admitted to the ICU since symptoms onset >7 days (44.4%) were more likely to have extra-pulmonary complications (19 [95.0%] vs 16 [64.0%], P = .034), including acute kidney injury, cardiac injury, acute heart failure, liver dysfunction, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hyperamylasemia, and hypernatremia. The incidence rates of acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumothorax, and hospital-acquired pneumonia had no difference between the 2 groups. Except activated partial thromboplastin and Na+ concentration, the laboratory findings were worse in group of time from symptoms onset to ICU admission >7 days. There was no difference in mortality between the 2 groups. Of the 45 cases in the ICU, 19 (42.2%) were non-survivors, and 16 (35.6%) were with hospital-acquired pneumonia. Among these non-survivors, hospital-acquired pneumonia was up to 12 (63.2%) besides higher incidence of extra-pulmonary complications. However, hospital-acquired pneumonia occurred in only 4 (15.4%) survivors. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 who admitted to ICU at once might get benefit from intensive care via lower rate of extra-pulmonary complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Symptom Assessment , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , China/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/etiology , Female , Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia/diagnosis , Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia/mortality , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Humans , Hyperamylasemia/diagnosis , Hyperamylasemia/etiology , Hypernatremia/diagnosis , Hypernatremia/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Analysis , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data
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