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1.
Sex Transm Dis ; 50(5): 304-309, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) care management, we assessed the number of PrEP users and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing-eligible PrEP users, STI testing rates, and prevalence between prepandemic (January 1, 2018-March 31, 2020) and early-pandemic (April 1, 2020-September 30, 2020) periods. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, a PrEP user for a given quarter is defined as either a previous PrEP user or a PrEP initiator who has at least 1-day coverage of tenofovir/emtricitabine in the given quarter. The STI testing-eligible PrEP users for a given quarter were defined as those persons whose runout date (previous dispense date + days of tenofovir/emtricitabine supply) was in the given quarter. RESULTS: The quarterly number of PrEP users increased from the first quarter of 2018 to the first quarter of 2020 and then decreased in the second and third quarter of 2020. Among STI testing-eligible PrEP users who had ≤14 days between runout and next refill date, gonorrhea and chlamydia screening testing rates were 95.1% for prepandemic and 93.4% for early pandemic ( P = 0.1011). Among all STI testing-eligible PrEP users who were tested for gonorrhea and chlamydia, gonorrhea prevalence was 6.7% for prepandemic and 5.7% for early pandemic ( P = 0.3096), and chlamydia prevalence was 7.0% for prepandemic and 5.8% for early pandemic ( P = 0.2158). CONCLUSIONS: Although the early COVID-19 pandemic resulted in lower numbers of PrEP users and PrEP initiators, individuals who remained continuous users of PrEP maintained extremely high rates of bacterial STI screening. With high STI prevalence among PrEP users, assessments of PrEP care management are continuously needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gonorrhea , HIV Infections , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Male , Humans , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Homosexuality, Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Tenofovir/therapeutic use , Emtricitabine , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods
2.
Sex Transm Dis ; 50(7): 415-419, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: National guidelines recommend sexually active women younger than 25 years be screened annually for chlamydia. Our objective was to estimate the chlamydia screening rate of sexually active women aged 16 to 24 years from 2011 to 2020. METHODS: We analyzed the chlamydia screening rates among sexually active women aged 16 to 24 years from 2011 to 2020 using the chlamydia measures in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set data set. The annual national chlamydia screening rates were further stratified by census region and by patient age. RESULTS: Chlamydia screening rates among sexually active women aged 16 to 24 years ranged from 55.0% to 61.8% in Medicaid health plans and from 46.9% to 52.4% in commercial health plans during 2011-2020. The Northeast consistently had the highest screening rates among 4 geographic regions. The chlamydia screening rate among sexually active women aged 16 to 24 years decreased from 2019 to 2020: from 61.8% to 57.9% in Medicaid plans and from 52.4% to 48.4% in commercial health plans. The number of sexually active women aged 16 to 24 years covered by commercial health plans decreased from 2019 to 2020, but the number covered by Medicaid increased from 2019 to 2020. CONCLUSIONS: The chlamydia screening rates in the target population have increased little from 2011 to 2019. The decrease in chlamydia screening rates between 2019 and 2020 could be related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the reduced use of health services during that period. With recently suboptimal chlamydia screening rates in the United States, interventions of improving and assessing chlamydia screening rates are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , United States/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medicaid , Chlamydia trachomatis , Mass Screening
3.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 29(2): 389-392, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198457

ABSTRACT

Ongoing symptoms might follow acute COVID-19. Using electronic health information, we compared pre‒ and post‒COVID-19 diagnostic codes to identify symptoms that had higher encounter incidence in the post‒COVID-19 period as sequelae. This method can be used for hypothesis generation and ongoing monitoring of sequelae of COVID-19 and future emerging diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(7): 490-496, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, disruptions were anticipated in the US health care system for routine preventive and other nonemergency care, including sexually transmitted infection care. METHODS: Using a large national laboratory data set, we assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the weekly numbers and percent positivity of chlamydia and gonorrhea tests ordered from the 5th week of 2019 to the 52nd week of 2020 in the United States. We compared weekly 2020 values for test volume, percent positive, and number of positives with the same week in 2019. We also examined the potential impact of stay-at-home orders for the month of April 2020. RESULTS: Immediately after the declaration of a national emergency for COVID-19 (week 11, 2020), the weekly number of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests steeply decreased. Tests then rebounded toward the 2019 pre-COVID-19 level beginning the 15th week of 2020. The weekly percent positive of chlamydia and gonorrhea remained consistently higher in 2020. In April 2020, the overall number of chlamydia tests was reduced by 53.0% (54.1% in states with stay-at-home orders vs. 45.5% in states without stay-at-home orders), whereas the percent positive of chlamydia and gonorrhea tests increased by 23.5% and 79.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: To limit the impact of the pandemic on control of chlamydia and gonorrhea, public health officials and health care providers can assess measures put in place during the pandemic and develop new interventions to enable care for sexually transmitted infections to be delivered under pandemic and other emergency conditions. The assessment like this study is continuously needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Gonorrhea , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/prevention & control , Chlamydia trachomatis , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S5-S16, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Late sequelae of COVID-19 have been reported; however, few studies have investigated the time course or incidence of late new COVID-19-related health conditions (post-COVID conditions) after COVID-19 diagnosis. Studies distinguishing post-COVID conditions from late conditions caused by other etiologies are lacking. Using data from a large administrative all-payer database, we assessed type, association, and timing of post-COVID conditions following COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: Using the Premier Healthcare Database Special COVID-19 Release (release date, 20 October 2020) data, during March-June 2020, 27 589 inpatients and 46 857 outpatients diagnosed with COVID-19 (case-patients) were 1:1 matched with patients without COVID-19 through the 4-month follow-up period (control-patients) by using propensity score matching. In this matched-cohort study, adjusted ORs were calculated to assess for late conditions that were more common in case-patients than control-patients. Incidence proportion was calculated for conditions that were more common in case-patients than control-patients during 31-120 days following a COVID-19 encounter. RESULTS: During 31-120 days after an initial COVID-19 inpatient hospitalization, 7.0% of adults experienced ≥1 of 5 post-COVID conditions. Among adult outpatients with COVID-19, 7.7% experienced ≥1 of 10 post-COVID conditions. During 31-60 days after an initial outpatient encounter, adults with COVID-19 were 2.8 times as likely to experience acute pulmonary embolism as outpatient control-patients and also more likely to experience a range of conditions affecting multiple body systems (eg, nonspecific chest pain, fatigue, headache, and respiratory, nervous, circulatory, and gastrointestinal symptoms) than outpatient control-patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings add to the evidence of late health conditions possibly related to COVID-19 in adults following COVID-19 diagnosis and can inform healthcare practice and resource planning for follow-up COVID-19 care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Outpatients , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Humans , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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