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1.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(12 Suppl 2): 4-15, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765600

ABSTRACT

Minimization of hospital lengths of stay has always been a key goal for healthcare systems. More so during the current COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, we have faced a reduction in no-COVID-19 admissions with the generation of huge backlogs. Low-risk patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be candidate for short-term hospitalization, with consequent reduction of waiting lists. Several single-center and multicenter observational studies, multiple randomized trials and some meta-analyses have addressed this topic.In this position paper, we present a proposal for short hospitalization for elective PCI procedures in selected patients who present complications only exceptionally and exclusively immediately after the procedure, if the inclusion and exclusion criteria are met. Each Center can choose between admission in day surgery or one day surgery, extending hospital length of stay only for patients who present complications or who are candidate for urgent surgery. Short-term hospitalization considerably reduces costs even if, with the current model, it generally results in a parallel reduction in reimbursement. Hence, we present an actual model, already tested successfully in an Italian hospital, that warrants sustainability. This approach can then be tailored to single Centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302318

ABSTRACT

Wearable devices (WDs) can objectively assess patient-reported outcomes (PROMs) in clinical trials. In this study, the feasibility and acceptability of using commercial WDs in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) will be explored. This is a prospective observational study. Participants were trained to use a WD and a smartphone to collect data on their physical activity, rest heart rate and number of hours of sleep. Validated questionnaires were also used to evaluate these outcomes. A technology acceptance questionnaire was used at the end of the follow up. In our participants an overall good compliance in wearing the device (75.1% vs. 79.8%, SAVR vs. TAVR) was assessed. Half of the patients were willing to continue using the device. Perceived ease of use is one of the domains that scored higher in the technology acceptance questionnaire. In this study we observed that the use of a WD is accepted in our frail population for an extended period. Even though commercial WDs are not tailored for clinical research, they can produce useful information on patient behavior, especially when coordinated with intervention tailored to the single patient.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Wearable Electronic Devices , Aged , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
EuroIntervention ; 16(14): 1177-1186, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136574

ABSTRACT

The rearrangement of healthcare services required to face the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to a drastic reduction in elective cardiac invasive procedures. We are already facing a "second wave" of infections and we might be dealing during the next months with a "third wave" and subsequently new waves. Therefore, during the different waves of the COVID-19 pandemic we have to face the problems of how to perform elective cardiac invasive procedures in non-COVID patients and which patients/procedures should be prioritised. In this context, the interplay between the pandemic stage, the availability of healthcare resources and the priority of specific cardiac disorders is crucial. Clear pathways for "hot" or presumed "hot" patients and "cold" patients are mandatory in each hospital. Depending on the local testing capacity and intensity of transmission in the area, healthcare facilities may test patients for SARS-CoV-2 infection before the interventional procedure, regardless of risk assessment for COVID-19. Pre-hospital testing should always be conducted in the presence of symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In cases of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 positive patients, full personal protective equipment using FFP 2/N95 masks, eye protection, gowning and gloves is indicated during cardiac interventions for healthcare workers. When patients have tested negative for COVID-19, medical masks may be sufficient. Indeed, individual patients should themselves wear medical masks during cardiac interventions and outpatient visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures , Elective Surgical Procedures , Pandemics , Humans , Masks , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 21(11 Suppl 1): 45S-47S, 2020 11.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to deferral of many non-urgent procedures in most healthcare systems worldwide. With this study we aimed to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on interventional treatment of structural heart disease (SHD) in Italy. METHODS: Numbers of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR), left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO), patent foramen ovale (PFO) closures performed over a 4-week period during the national lockdown in Italian centers performing over 60 structural heart interventions (SHI)/year were compared with the same 4-week period in 2019. Incidence rate reductions (IRR) were estimated by zero-inflated negative binomial regression. RESULTS: According to our nationwide analysis, SHIs were reduced by 79% as compared to the same period in 2019 (IRR 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.29). This reduction was more substantial for PFO closure (IRR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.07), LAAO (IRR 0.11, 95% CI 0.05-0.25) and PMVR (IRR 0.12, 95% CI 0.04-0.36) as compared to TAVR (IRR 0.31, 95% CI 0.22-0.47). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic caused a 79% drop in SHI volumes in Italy. PFO closure, LAAO and PMVR decreased more significantly as compared to TAVR. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of this reduction on outcomes of patients with SHD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Atrial Appendage/surgery , Confidence Intervals , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Foramen Ovale, Patent/surgery , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mitral Valve/surgery , Prevalence , Time Factors , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data
6.
EuroIntervention ; 16(14): 1177-1186, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016333

ABSTRACT

The rearrangement of healthcare services required to face the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to a drastic reduction in elective cardiac invasive procedures. We are already facing a "second wave" of infections and we might be dealing during the next months with a "third wave" and subsequently new waves. Therefore, during the different waves of the COVID-19 pandemic we have to face the problems of how to perform elective cardiac invasive procedures in non-COVID patients and which patients/procedures should be prioritised. In this context, the interplay between the pandemic stage, the availability of healthcare resources and the priority of specific cardiac disorders is crucial. Clear pathways for "hot" or presumed "hot" patients and "cold" patients are mandatory in each hospital. Depending on the local testing capacity and intensity of transmission in the area, healthcare facilities may test patients for SARS-CoV-2 infection before the interventional procedure, regardless of risk assessment for COVID-19. Pre-hospital testing should always be conducted in the presence of symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In cases of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 positive patients, full personal protective equipment using FFP 2/N95 masks, eye protection, gowning and gloves is indicated during cardiac interventions for healthcare workers. When patients have tested negative for COVID-19, medical masks may be sufficient. Indeed, individual patients should themselves wear medical masks during cardiac interventions and outpatient visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures , Elective Surgical Procedures , Pandemics , Humans , Masks , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur Heart J ; 41(19): 1839-1851, 2020 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260376

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses an unprecedented challenge to healthcare worldwide. The infection can be life threatening and require intensive care treatment. The transmission of the disease poses a risk to both patients and healthcare workers. The number of patients requiring hospital admission and intensive care may overwhelm health systems and negatively affect standard care for patients presenting with conditions needing emergency interventions. This position statements aims to assist cardiologists in the invasive management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. To that end, we assembled a panel of interventional cardiologists and acute cardiac care specialists appointed by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) and from the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACVC) and included the experience from the first and worst affected areas in Europe. Modified diagnostic and treatment algorithms are proposed to adapt evidence-based protocols for this unprecedented challenge. Various clinical scenarios, as well as management algorithms for patients with a diagnosed or suspected COVID-19 infection, presenting with ST- and non-ST-segment elevation ACS are described. In addition, we address the need for re-organization of ACS networks, with redistribution of hub and spoke hospitals, as well as for in-hospital reorganization of emergency rooms and cardiac units, with examples coming from multiple European countries. Furthermore, we provide a guidance to reorganization of catheterization laboratories and, importantly, measures for protection of healthcare providers involved with invasive procedures.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Cardiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Acute Coronary Syndrome/virology , COVID-19 , Cardiology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/virology
8.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 96(4): 839-843, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-832030

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic raised the issue to guarantee the proper level of care to patients with acute cardiovascular diseases and concomitant suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and, in the meantime safety and protection of healthcare providers. The aim of this position paper is to provide standards to healthcare facilities and healthcare providers on infection prevention and control measures during the management of suspected and confirmed cases of 2019-nCoV infection accessing in cath-lab. The document represents the view of the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (GISE), and it is based on recommendations from the main World and European Health Organizations (WHO, and ECDC) as well as from the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Catheterization , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Italy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
9.
Int J Cardiol ; 323: 288-291, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728589

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COronaVIrus Disease 19 (COVID-19) led to the reorganization of Cardiology Units in terms of working spaces and healthcare personnel. In this scenario, both outpatient visits and elective interventional cardiology procedures were suspended and/or postponed. We aimed to report the impact of COVID-19 on interventional coronary and structural procedures in Piedmont, Italy. METHODS: The number of coronary angiographies (CAG), percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), primary PCI (pPCI), transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVR) and Mitraclip performed in Piedmont between March 1st and April 20th, 2020 (CoV-time) were collected from each catheterization laboratory and compared to the number of procedures performed the year before in the same months (NoCoV-time). RESULTS: Procedural data from 18 catheterization laboratories were collected. Both coronary (5498 versus 2888: difference: -47.5%; mean 305.4 VS 160.4; p = 0.002) and structural (84 versus 17: difference: -79.8%; mean 4.7 Vs 0.9; p < 0.001) procedures decreased during CoV-time compared to NoCoV-time. In particular, coronary angiographies (1782 versus 3460), PCI (1074 versus 1983), p PCI (271 versus 410), TAVR (11 versus 72) and Mitraclip (6 versus 12) showed a reduction of 48.5%, 45.7%, 33.7%, 84.7% and 50.0%, respectively (all p for comparison <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the same time-period in 2019, both coronary and structural interventional procedures during COVID-19 epidemic suffered a dramatic decrease in Piedmont, Italy. Organizational change and structured clinical pathways should be created, together with awareness campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Angiography/statistics & numerical data , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mitral Valve/surgery , Pandemics
10.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(15): e017175, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724014

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is expected to affect operations and lifestyles of interventional cardiologists around the world in unprecedented ways. Timely gathering of information on this topic can provide valuable insight and improve the handling of the ongoing and future pandemic outbreaks. Methods and Results A survey instrument developed by the authors was disseminated via e-mail, text messaging, WhatsApp, and social media to interventional cardiologists between April 6, 2020, and April 11, 2020. A total of 509 responses were collected from 18 countries, mainly from the United States (51%) and Italy (36%). Operators reported significant decline in coronary, structural heart, and endovascular procedure volumes. Personal protective equipment was available to 95% of respondents; however FIT-tested N95 or equivalent masks were available to only 70%, and 74% indicated absence of coronavirus disease 2019 pretesting. Most (83%) operators expressed concern when asked to perform cardiac catheterization on a suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 patient, primarily because of fear of viral transmission (88%). Although the survey demonstrated significant compliance with social distancing, high use of telemedicine (69%), and online education platforms (80%), there was concern over impending financial loss. Conclusions Our survey indicates significant reduction in invasive procedure volumes and concern for viral transmission. There is near universal adoption of personal protective equipment; however, coronavirus disease 2019 pretesting and access to FIT-tested N95 masks is suboptimal. Although there is concern over impending financial loss, substantial engagement in telemedicine and online education is reported.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Catheterization/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Cardiology/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
EuroIntervention ; 16(3): 233-246, 2020 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648041

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses an unprecedented challenge to healthcare worldwide. The infection can be life threatening and require intensive care treatment. The transmission of the disease poses a risk to both patients and healthcare workers. The number of patients requiring hospital admission and intensive care may overwhelm health systems and negatively affect standard care for patients presenting with conditions needing emergency interventions. This position statements aims to assist cardiologists in the invasive management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. To that end, we assembled a panel of interventional cardiologists and acute cardiac care specialists appointed by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) and from the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACVC) and included the experience from the first and worst affected areas in Europe. Modified diagnostic and treatment algorithms are proposed to adapt evidence-based protocols for this unprecedented challenge. Various clinical scenarios, as well as management algorithms for patients with a diagnosed or suspected COVID-19 infection, presenting with ST- and non-ST-segment elevation ACS are described. In addition, we address the need for re-organization of ACS networks, with redistribution of hub and spoke hospitals, as well as for in-hospital reorganization of emergency rooms and cardiac units, with examples coming from multiple European countries. Furthermore, we provide a guidance to reorganization of catheterization laboratories and, importantly, measures for protection of healthcare providers involved with invasive procedures.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Cardiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Algorithms , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Europe , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 97(2): 195-198, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-254291

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report our initial experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)/acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing standard of care invasive management. BACKGROUND: The rapid diffusion of the SARS-CoV-2 together with the need for isolation for infected patients might be responsible for a suboptimal treatment for SARS-CoV-2 ACS patients. Recently, the group of Sichuan published a protocol for COVID/ACS infected patients that see the thrombolysis as the gold standard of care. METHODS: We enrolled 31 consecutive patients affected by SARS-COV-2 admitted to our emergencies room for suspected ACS. RESULTS: All patients underwent urgent coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) when required except two patients with severe hypoxemia and unstable hemodynamic condition that were conservatively treated. Twenty-one cases presented diffuse ST-segment depression while in the remaining cases anterior and inferior ST-elevation was present in four and six cases, respectively. PCI was performed in all cases expect two that were diagnosed as suspected myocarditis because of the absence of severe coronary disease and three with apical ballooning at ventriculography diagnostic for Tako-Tsubo syndromes. Two patients conservatively treated died. The remaining patients undergoing PCI survived except one that required endotracheal intubation (ETI) and died at Day 6. ETI was required in five more patients while in the remaining cases CPAP was used for respiratory support. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent PCI for ACS is often required in SARS-CoV-2 patients improving the prognosis in all but the most advanced patients. Complete patient history and examination, routine ECG monitoring, echocardiography, and careful evaluation of changes in cardiac enzymes should be part of the regular assessment procedures also in dedicated COVID positive units.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/virology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Angiography , Electrocardiography , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
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