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1.
International Journal of Therapy & Rehabilitation ; 28(9):1-10, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1444528

ABSTRACT

Background: Sinus tachycardia is a common arrhythmia in patients with COVID-19, and may pose challenges during rehabilitation. Case description: This is a case report of a 39-year-old critically ill patient with COVID-19 with no premorbid conditions, who presented with intensive care unit-acquired weakness and persistent sinus tachycardia after their stay in an intensive care unit. The sinus tachycardia and exertional symptoms contributed to a severely limited exercise capacity (assessed through the 6-Minute Walk Test and 2-Minute Step Test), which impaired the progress of inpatient rehabilitation. This was addressed through the use of bisoprolol for heart rate control and a rehabilitation programme based on cardiac rehabilitation principles. Results: The patient's intensive care unit-acquired weakness improved with exercise-based rehabilitation, and the Functional Independence Measure motor subscore improved from 54/91 to 91/91 on discharge after 6 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. After bisoprolol was started for sinus tachycardia, the patient's resting heart rate improved from 106 beats per minute to less than 90 beats per minute during this period of inpatient rehabilitation. During the same period, the patient exhibited concurrent improvement in exercise capacity on weekly 6-Minute Walk Test measurements. Improvements in the 2-Minute Step Test were also documented. Conclusions: Patient assessment using submaximal exercise testing with serial 6-Minute Walk Tests and 2-Minute Step Tests, along with using beta-blockers and cardiac rehabilitation principles, can be useful in the post-acute rehabilitation of patients recovering from COVID-19 with persistent sinus tachycardia.

2.
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation ; 102(10):e22-e22, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1439864

ABSTRACT

To describe the functional outcomes of patients with critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) after transfer out of intensive care unit (ICU). Retrospective observational cohort study. National designated center for patients with COVID-19. 51 consecutive critically ill COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Patients were referred for physical therapy after transferring out from ICU if they had functional impairments. Functional outcomes were measured primarily with the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), and divided into 2 categories: dependent ambulators (FAC 0-3) and independent ambulators (FAC 4-5). Secondary outcomes measured included ADL dependence of patients and the need for supplemental oxygen. All patients were premorbidly independent in walking and in basic ADLs, and did not require supplementary oxygen. Upon transfer out of ICU, there were 24 patients (47.1%) who were dependent walkers (defined as FAC of 0-3) with 22 patients (43.1%) who were dependent in 1 or more basic ADLs. However, upon discharge, a majority achieved independence in ambulation and basic ADLs (92.2% and 90.2% respectively). All 41 patients (80.4%) who required continuous supplementary oxygen upon transferring out of ICU did not require supplementary oxygen on discharge. On multivariate analysis, we found that a Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1 or more (odds ratio 14.02, 95% CI 1.15-171.28, P=0.039) and a longer length of ICU stay (odds ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.16, P=0.029) were associated with dependent ambulation upon discharge from ICU. Critically ill COVID-19 survivors have a high level of impairment following discharge from ICU. Such patients should be screened for impairment and managed appropriately by rehabilitation professionals, so as to achieve good functional outcomes on discharge. None to disclose.

3.
J Rehabil Med Clin Commun ; 3: 1000044, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197496

ABSTRACT

Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome, characterized by dyspnoea and arterial desaturation while upright, is a rare complication of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report here 2 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, who were diagnosed with platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome during commencement of rehabilitation, 18 and 9 days respectively after admission to the intensive care unit. Both patients presented with normocapnic hypoxaemia. One patient required mechanical ventilation with supplemental oxygen during intensive care, while the other required high-flow nasal oxygen therapy. The manifestations of platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome were most prominent during physiotherapy, when verticalization was attempted, and hindered further mobilization out of bed, including ambulation. This report describes the clinical manifestations of platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome and the rehabilitative strategies carried out for these 2 patients. The platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome in these patients resolved after 65 and 22 days respectively from the day of detection. This report highlights this potentially under-recognized phenomenon, which may be unmasked during rehabilitation of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Good functional outcomes were achieved with a combination of verticalization training with supplemental oxygen support, respiratory techniques training and progressive endurance and resistance training, whilst awaiting resolution of the platypneaorthodeoxia syndrome.

4.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(1): 39-43, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066488

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Apart from respiratory symptoms, encephalopathy and a range of central nervous system complications have been described in coronavirus disease 2019. However, there is a lack of published literature on the rehabilitative course and functional outcomes of severe coronavirus disease 2019 with encephalopathy. In addition, the presence of subclinical neurocognitive sequelae during postacute rehabilitation has not been described and may be underrecognized by rehabilitation providers. We report the rehabilitative course of a middle-aged male patient with severe coronavirus disease 2019 who required intensive care and mechanical ventilation. During postacute inpatient rehabilitation for severe intensive care unit-related weakness, an abnormal cognitive screen prompted brain magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed destructive leukoencephalopathy. Subsequently, detailed psychometric evaluation revealed significant impairments in the domains of processing speed and executive function. After 40 days of intensive inpatient rehabilitation, he was discharged home with independent function. This report highlights the need for an increased awareness of covert subclinical neurocognitive sequelae, the role of comprehensive rehabilitation, and value of routine cognitive screening therein and describes the neurocognitive features in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Critical Care , Leukoencephalopathies/etiology , Leukoencephalopathies/rehabilitation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge
5.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 615997, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063333

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) is a global cause of morbidity and mortality currently. We aim to describe the acute functional outcomes of critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients after transferring out of the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: 51 consecutive critically ill COVID-19 patients at a national designated center for COVID-19 were included in this exploratory, retrospective observational cohort study from January 1 to May 31, 2020. Demographic and clinical data were collected and analyzed. Functional outcomes were measured primarily with the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), and divided into 2 categories: dependent ambulators (FAC 0-3) and independent ambulators (FAC 4-5). Multivariate analysis was performed to determine associations. Results: Many patients were dependent ambulators (47.1%) upon transferring out of ICU, although 92.2% regained independent ambulation at discharge. On multivariate analysis, we found that a Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1 or more (odds ratio 14.02, 95% CI 1.15-171.28, P = 0.039) and a longer length of ICU stay (odds ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.16, P = 0.029) were associated with dependent ambulation upon discharge from ICU. Conclusions: Critically ill COVID-19 survivors have a high level of impairment following discharge from ICU. Such patients should be screened for impairment and managed appropriately by rehabilitation professionals, so as to achieve good functional outcomes on discharge.

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