Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
2.
Medical Surveillance Monthly Report ; 29(7):11-18, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2058214

ABSTRACT

This report describes SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance conducted by the Department of Defense (DoD) Global Emerging Infections Surveillance Branch and the Next-Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics Consortium (NGSBC) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Samples and sequence data were from SARS-CoV-2 infections occurring among Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries from 1 March to 31 December 2020. There were 1,366 MHS samples sequenced from 10 countries, 36 U.S states or territories, and 5 Geographic Combatant Commands, representing approxi-mately 2% of DoD cases in 2020. Genomes from these samples were compared with other public sequences;observed trends were similar to those of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national surveillance in the U.S. with B.1, B.1.2, and other sub-lineages comprising the dominant variants of SARS-CoV-2. Sequence data were used to monitor transmission dynamics on U.S. Navy ships and at military training centers and installations. As new variants emerge, DoD medical and public health practitioners should maxi-mize the use of genomic surveillance resources within DoD to inform force health protection measures. © 2022, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. All rights reserved.

3.
Journal of business and psychology ; : 1-15, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2045338

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by a sharp increase in prejudice and discrimination targeting Asian Americans in the USA. Thus, in addition to the public health risks associated with the virus, exposure to discrimination poses a unique threat to the health and well-being of Asian Americans. Indeed, empirical evidence has documented the linkage between experiencing anti-Asian discrimination during the pandemic and health decrements among Asian Americans. The goal of this study was to expand that research to also consider the ways experiencing discrimination in a nonwork context may spill over to affect the general and job-related well-being of Asian American employees as well as the potential mitigating role of coworker compassion. Results from a sample of 311 Asian American employees demonstrated that experiencing nonwork discrimination was associated with decrements in physical health and increased depression and job-related exhaustion. Further, there were significant interactions between nonwork discrimination and coworker compassion for engagement, emotional exhaustion, and depressive symptoms such that nonwork discrimination was more strongly related to each outcome when coworker compassion was low. The findings from the current study suggest that experiences of racial derogation, even those that occur outside the workplace environment, are detrimental to the well-being of employees and that coworker compassion is a positive resource that may foster healthier and more inclusive work environments. Supplementary Information The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s10869-022-09848-6.

4.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-592, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967333

ABSTRACT

Background: Waning levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) antibodies, particularly neutralizing, are associated with the risk of breakthrough infections. The impact of immunosuppression on antibody decay kinetics is unclear. We have previously reported a strong correlation between total anti-S antibodies and neutralization titers. Here, we report the decay kinetics in anti-S IgG antibodies across various immunosuppressive medications used in patients with CID. Methods: We recruited a volunteer sample of adults with confirmed CID eligible for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in a prospective observational cohort study at two United States CID referral centers. All study participants received two doses of mRNA vaccine to SARSCoV- 2. To assess the durability of immunogenicity, anti-S IgG were measured at 7 (visit 3), 90 (visit 5), and 120 (visit 6) days after the 2nd dose of mRNA vaccine. The impact of various medications was assessed in repeated measures mixed model with the patient as a random effect, adjusting for gender and age, and using the group of patients on sulfasalazine, NSAIDs, or on no medications as a reference, using STATA. The half-life of anti-S IgG for a 50 percent reduction in titers at visit 3 was calculated for each medication class. Results: A total of 316 CID patients were recruited of which 148 (46.8%) had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Durability was assessed in 495 samples obtained in 293 patients. The arithmetic mean of anti-S IgG antibodies for each medication class at visits 3, 5, and 6 is shown in Figure 1. Overall, a 2-fold reduction in titers was observed from 7 to 90 days and 90 to 120 days (Table 1). The strongest decline was observed among patients on B cell depleting/ modulating therapies followed by those on combinations of biologics and/or small molecules and antimetabolites (methotrexate, leflunomide, thiopurines, mycophenolate mofetil, and teriflunomide). There was modest decline seen with TNFi (half-life 430.5 days, -2.15, 95% CI - 4.31 to - 1.07, p = 0.03). There was also a modest, but not significant, decline seen with Janus Kinase inhibitor (JAKi). No decline was seen with anti-IL-23 or anti-integrin medication classes. Conclusions: Antibody decay in patients with CID is not observed in patients on anti-integrins or anti-IL-23 while it is seen among patients on TNFi, JAKi, antimetabolites, and combinations of biologics and/or small molecules. Our data and those from other cohorts may be used to prioritize medication classes for boosting immunogenicity with additional doses of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. Collection of antibody titers after booster doses is currently ongoing.(Table Presented) (Figure Presented) Figure 1: Durability of anti-spike IgG antibodies after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with Chronic Inflammatory Disease

5.
Blood Cancer Discov ; 3(3): 181-193, 2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883342

ABSTRACT

Patients with B-lymphoid malignancies have been consistently identified as a population at high risk of severe COVID-19. Whether this is exclusively due to cancer-related deficits in humoral and cellular immunity, or whether risk of severe COVID-19 is increased by anticancer therapy, is uncertain. Using data derived from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19), we show that patients treated for B-lymphoid malignancies have an increased risk of severe COVID-19 compared with control populations of patients with non-B-lymphoid malignancies. Among patients with B-lymphoid malignancies, those who received anticancer therapy within 12 months of COVID-19 diagnosis experienced increased COVID-19 severity compared with patients with non-recently treated B-lymphoid malignancies, after adjustment for cancer status and several other prognostic factors. Our findings suggest that patients recently treated for a B-lymphoid malignancy are at uniquely high risk for severe COVID-19. SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that recent therapy for a B-lymphoid malignancy is an independent risk factor for COVID-19 severity. These findings provide rationale to develop mitigation strategies targeted at the uniquely high-risk population of patients with recently treated B-lymphoid malignancies. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 171.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphatic Diseases , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:1, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1879979
8.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) are frequently treated with immunosuppressive medications that can increase their risk of severe COVID-19. While novel mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccination platforms provide robust protection in immunocompetent individuals, the immunogenicity in CID patients on immunosuppression is not well established. Therefore, determining the effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in the setting of immunosuppression is essential to risk-stratify CID patients with impaired protection and provide clinical guidance regarding medication management. METHODS: We conducted a prospective assessment of mRNA-based vaccine immunogenicity in 133 adults with CIDs and 53 immunocompetent controls. Blood from participants over 18 years of age was collected before initial immunization and 1-2 weeks after the second immunization. Serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) IgG + binding, neutralizing antibody titers, and circulating S-specific plasmablasts were quantified to assess the magnitude and quality of the humoral response following vaccination. RESULTS: Compared to immunocompetent controls, a three-fold reduction in anti-S IgG titers (P=0.009) and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization (p<0.0001) were observed in CID patients. B cell depletion and glucocorticoids exerted the strongest effect with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in humoral responses, respectively (p<0.0001). Janus kinase inhibitors and antimetabolites, including methotrexate, also blunted antibody titers in multivariate regression analysis (P<0.0001, P=0.0023, respectively). Other targeted therapies, such as TNF inhibitors, IL-12/23 inhibitors, and integrin inhibitors, had only modest impacts on antibody formation and neutralization. CONCLUSIONS: CID patients treated with immunosuppressive therapies exhibit impaired SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immunity, with glucocorticoids and B cell depletion therapy more severely impeding optimal responses.

9.
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation ; 41(4):S508-S509, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1796805

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Many acceptable donor hearts are turned down by pediatric centers with varying criteria for an acceptable donor. Advanced Cardiac Therapy Improving Outcome Network (ACTION) and Pediatric Heart Transplant Society (PHTS) centers convened a multi-institutional donor decision discussion forum (DDDF) aimed at assessing donor acceptance practice and reducing practice variation across centers. Methods: The team hosted an hour-long monthly virtual DDDF among pediatric transplant centers across North America, UK and Brazil. Each call had two case presentations posing a donor decision challenge for the presenting center at the time of donor offer. Following each presentation, the attendee group was polled to obtain insight on donor acceptance practices after which the presenting center's decision was revealed. Then, group discussion occurred including a review of relevant literature and latest PHTS data related to the case. Metrics of participation, participant agreement with presenting center decision and impact on future decision making were collected and analyzed. Results: Over 14 months, 23 cases were discussed;an average of 50 physicians, nurses and fellows attended each call. The mean donor age was 8.2 ± 3.3 years (28.6% infants, 52.4% young adults), and the mean recipient age was 8.36 ± 3.3 years (27.3% infants and 40.9% teenagers). Reason for listing was congenital heart disease in 10, cardiomyopathy in 5 and retransplantation in 3. Risk factors influencing decision making included size discrepancy (4), Infection (5), COVID (2), Prolonged QT (2), Malignancy (2), Drugs (2), Distance (1) Prolonged CPR (1) high inotrope use (1) Dialysis (1) Diabetes (1) HLA mismatch (1). Of the 23 cases, 15 were declined by presenting center. Donor characteristics influenced 45% of the decisions and recipient only 20%, with rest being other factors. Participants agreed with the decision made by the presenting center 55% of the times. The post-presentation discussion resulted in 30% of participants changing their original decision. Conclusion: DDDF identified significant variation in pediatric donor acceptance practices;with donor characteristics most influential in decision-making. Given that the discussions changed decisions in 1/3rd of the participants, DDDF may be a useful format to reduce practice variation, provide education to decision makers and eventually increase donor utilization.

12.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(3): ofac037, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701403

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The frequency of coinfections and their association with outcomes have not been adequately studied among patients with cancer and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a high-risk group for coinfection. METHODS: We included adult (≥18 years) patients with active or prior hematologic or invasive solid malignancies and laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection, using data from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19, NCT04354701). We captured coinfections within ±2 weeks from diagnosis of COVID-19, identified factors cross-sectionally associated with risk of coinfection, and quantified the association of coinfections with 30-day mortality. RESULTS: Among 8765 patients (hospitalized or not; median age, 65 years; 47.4% male), 16.6% developed coinfections: 12.1% bacterial, 2.1% viral, 0.9% fungal. An additional 6.4% only had clinical diagnosis of a coinfection. The adjusted risk of any coinfection was positively associated with age >50 years, male sex, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal comorbidities, diabetes, hematologic malignancy, multiple malignancies, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status, progressing cancer, recent cytotoxic chemotherapy, and baseline corticosteroids; the adjusted risk of superinfection was positively associated with tocilizumab administration. Among hospitalized patients, high neutrophil count and C-reactive protein were positively associated with bacterial coinfection risk, and high or low neutrophil count with fungal coinfection risk. Adjusted mortality rates were significantly higher among patients with bacterial (odds ratio [OR], 1.61; 95% CI, 1.33-1.95) and fungal (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.28-3.76) coinfections. CONCLUSIONS: Viral and fungal coinfections are infrequent among patients with cancer and COVID-19, with the latter associated with very high mortality rates. Clinical and laboratory parameters can be used to guide early empiric antimicrobial therapy, which may improve clinical outcomes.

13.
Civil Engineering Magazine Archive ; 91(6):58-69, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1597379

ABSTRACT

A century-old, abandoned hospital in Chicago has been converted into a mixed-use facility as part of a larger, $1 billion redevelopment of the city's Illinois Medical District. Members of the hospital project's design team explain their efforts to preserve, restore, and reimagine the historic structure. © 2021 American Society of Civil Engineers.

14.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-292899

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) are frequently treated with immunosuppressive medications that can increase their risk of severe COVID-19. While novel mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccination platforms provide robust protection in immunocompetent individuals, the immunogenicity in CID patients on immunosuppression is not well established. Therefore, determining the effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in the setting of immunosuppression is essential to risk-stratify CID patients with impaired protection and provide clinical guidance regarding medication management. Methods: We conducted a prospective assessment of mRNA-based vaccine immunogenicity in 133 adults with CIDs and 53 immunocompetent controls. Blood from participants over 18 years of age was collected before initial immunization and 1-2 weeks after the second immunization. Serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) IgG + binding, neutralizing antibody titers, and circulating S-specific plasmablasts were quantified to assess the magnitude and quality of the humoral response following vaccination. Results: Compared to immunocompetent controls, a three-fold reduction in anti-S IgG titers (P=0.009) and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization (p<0.0001) were observed in CID patients. B cell depletion and glucocorticoids exerted the strongest effect with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in humoral responses, respectively (p<0.0001). Janus kinase inhibitors and antimetabolites, including methotrexate, also blunted antibody titers in multivariate regression analysis (P<0.0001, P=0.0023, respectively). Other targeted therapies, such as TNF inhibitors, IL-12/23 inhibitors, and integrin inhibitors, had only modest impacts on antibody formation and neutralization. Conclusions: CID patients treated with immunosuppressive therapies exhibit impaired SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immunity, with glucocorticoids and B cell depletion therapy more severely impeding optimal responses.

15.
Radiotherapy and Oncology ; 161:S1199-S1200, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1492817

ABSTRACT

Purpose or Objective: Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency with a potential for catastrophic neurological deficit. Once diagnosed, MSCC requires urgent treatment to avoid neurological disability. We looked at health-seeking behavioural changes in lockdown 1(L1) (March 23-June 24 2020) compared to the lockdown 2(L2) (Oct 25-Dec 2 2020) in England, UK. This study posited that incidence of MSCC in 2020 especially during L1, would increase due to: (i)reduced access to NHS resources due to the pandemic (ii) change in health-seeking behaviour due to perceived risk of COVID-19. (iii) changes to previously accepted practice with regards to systemic and radiotherapy treatment. Modelling studies have shown these factors led to a delay in diagnoses with increased late-stage presentations and cancer-related death. Following the national campaign that ensued due to decline in cancer diagnosis in L1, we hypothesized a reduction in MSCC presentations in L2, due to increased public health awareness and continued availability of cancer services, despite lockdown. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, multicentre analyses of MSCC cases across Kent was undertaken for year 2020. Year 2019 served as control. Study included all MSCC cases across the following NHS trusts (i) Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells (ii) Dartford and Gravesham (iii) East Kent University Hospital and (iv) Medway. Shapiro-Wilk was used to assess normality and unpaired T-test to compare referral numbers between 2019 vs 2020 and between L1 vs L2. p ≤0.05 was considered significant. Results: There were 134 MSCC cases in 2019 vs 193 in 2020. An average of 12 patients per month were treated in 2019 vs 17 in 2020, p=0.002 (fig 1). During L1, the average number of patients was 16 per month vs 11 in 2019 in the same period, p=0.08. For L2, it was 19 vs 11 respectively, p=0.10 (fig 2). More patients were offered single 8Gy fraction treatment in 2020 [77% (n=149) vs 66% (n=89)] (fig 2). (Figure Presented) Conclusion: There was an increase in the total number of MSCC in 2020 and in the average cases per month during lockdowns. This was expected given recent data showing delay in cancer diagnoses with an increase in late presentations. Though the number of MSCC was higher in L2 vs L1, there was a downward trend towards the end of L2. This may signify the positive impact of the national cancer campaign. Unfortunately, Kent region was badly hit with the new Covid 19 strain (B117) and most of the services were affected due to staff redeployment, sickness and isolation. Many patients with existing comorbidities are still anxious utilising hospital services due to perceived infection risk. Further work will be needed to reverse health-seeking behaviours to pre-pandemic levels. Focused cancer public health campaign may be required to allay patient fears and ensure safety, during use of vital health services. More single 8Gy fractions were delivered in 2020 compared to any previous years, indicating MSCC patients may now be scanned, planned and treated in one visit.

17.
PLoS ONE ; 16(2), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1410710

ABSTRACT

Background: Sensitive and high throughput molecular detection assays are essential during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The vast majority of the SARS-CoV-2 molecular assays use nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) or oropharyngeal swab (OPS) specimens collected from suspected individuals. However, using NPS or OPS as specimens has apparent drawbacks, e.g. the collection procedures for NPS or OPS specimens can be uncomfortable to some people and may cause sneezing and coughing which in turn generate droplets and/or aerosol particles that are of risk to healthcare workers, requiring heavy use of personal protective equipment. There have been recent studies indicating that self-collected saliva specimens can be used for molecular detection of SARS-CoV-2 and provides more comfort and ease of use for the patients. Here we report the performance of QuantiVirusTM SARS-CoV-2 test using saliva as the testing specimens with or without pooling. Methods Development and validation studies were conducted following FDA-EUA and molecular assay validation guidelines. Using SeraCare Accuplex SARS-CoV-2 reference panel, the limit of detection (LOD) and clinical performance studies were performed with the QuantiVirusTM SARS-CoV-2 test. For clinical evaluation, 85 known positive and 90 known negative clinical NPS samples were tested. Additionally, twenty paired NPS and saliva samples collected from recovering COVID-19 patients were tested and the results were further compared to that of the Abbott m2000 SARS-CoV-2 PCR assay. Results of community collected 389 saliva samples for COVID-19 screening by QuantiVirusTM SARS-CoV-2 test were also obtained and analyzed. Additionally, testing of pooled saliva samples was evaluated.

18.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 20:S91, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1361565

ABSTRACT

Background: In April 2020, CFRD MDT started a Virtual Clinic (VC) to provide diabetes care at home to limit risk of COVID-19. To maintain quality of care, we used a new model. 1 week pre-clinic patient completed food and blood glucose diary plus questionnaires returning them via LibreView, Diasend or email. The CFRD MDT reviewed data (diabetologist, CF physician, diabetes nurse and dietitian) and planned management, then contacted patient with plan. Objective: Assess patient experience of VC to guide service development. Method: 15 questions designed on SurveyMonkey with patient representative. Survey sent to patients seen April-Nov. Patients invited to fill out the survey once even if >1 VC. Reminder email + text links sent 7 days later. Results: Survey distributed to 56 patients, response rate 50%. 88% returned food and blood glucose diaries pre-clinic. Majority (84%) uploaded data via LibreView and 100% of respondents found it easy to send. Participants reported positive experiences of VC. Reported advantages included less travel to clinic (63%), ability contact team between clinic (44%), able to upload glucose data at home (41%), VC reduces risk cross-infection (42%), able to contact MDT more frequently (37%). 64% reported no disadvantages (20% felt less personal). 58% would like option of Video consultations in future. Conclusion: Overall responses indicate positive reception of telehealth in the CFRD clinic. The introduction of VC enabled more regular monitoring of diabetes control using novel technology such as LibreView, Diasend and Dexcom CLARITY. The majority of patients found technology easy to use. Patients appreciated the frequent contact with the CFRD team, with support from their own homes reducing the barrier of travel on accessing treatment. Patients highlighted reduced risk of cross-infection during COVID-19 when they had heightened concerns. Future developments include the introduction of video-conferencing which patients feel will enhance the consultations.

19.
Blood ; 136:4-5, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1344051

ABSTRACT

[Formula presented] Introduction Daratumumab, when added to standard of care regimens in relapsed and untreated myeloma, has consistently demonstrated significant improvements in response rates, induction of MRD negative responses and progression-free survival (PFS) while proving highly tolerable with minor increases in overall regimen toxicity. In non-transplant eligible patients daratumumab has been added in randomized studies to lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) and bortezomib, melphalan and prednisolone (VMP) backbones, but not to the VCD regimen. Furthermore, the randomized studies excluded a significant proportion of patients with comorbidities so the benefit of daratumumab in a frail, elderly myeloma population remains untested. Methods Inclusion criteria included untreated patients with symptomatic myeloma who were considered ineligible for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation due to either age >65years or the presence of comorbidities. Any degree of renal impairment, including dialysis dependence, was allowed as were patients with a prior history of systemic malignancy that had been disease-free for 2 years. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive VCD or VCDD. VCD consisted of nine 5-week cycles of V 1.3 mg/m2 SC on Days 1, 8, 15 and 22;C 300mg/m2 PO on Days 1, 8, 15 and 22 and D 20 mg PO on Days 1, 8, 15 and 22. VCDD consisted of nine 5-week cycles of VCD plus daratumumab 16 mg/kg IV on Days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of cycles 1 and 2, Days 1 and 15 of cycles 3 to 6 and Day 1 of cycles 7 to 9, followed by daratumumab maintenance 16 mg/kg IV every 4 weeks until progression. The primary endpoint was PFS with secondary endpoints being response rates, MRD, overall survival, toxicity and quality of life. Results A total of 129 patients were randomized, but 7 did not commence intended therapy. The following modified ITT analysis is based on the 122 randomized patients, 58 in the VCD group and 64 in the VCDD group, who received therapy. Baseline characteristics were balanced between the two arms. Median age was 76 years (range, 62-91yrs), with 19% being ≥80 years of age. 30% were female. ECOG performance status was 0 (34%),1 (26%), 2 (16%) and unknown (25%). ISS stage was I (16%), II (36%), III (23%) and unknown (24%). The estimated median potential follow-up is 12.6 months. At the time of this report, the COVID-19 pandemic had impacted collection of site data. As a result, the following outcome data is provisional with a full data set to be available for presentation of the formal pre-planned interim analysis by the time of the ASH meeting. Overall response rate was 86% for VCD and 93% for VCDD. There was no significant difference between response rates after 4 cycles of induction for the VCD and VCDD arms: CR 3% vs 2%, VGPR 31% vs 41%, PR 51% vs 50%, MR 11% vs 7%, PD 3% vs 0%. Median PFS for the entire cohort (Fig A) was 21.8 months (95%CI 17.1-31.6 months). Median PFS for those treated with VCD was 18.9 months (95%CI 15.3-NR) and was 26.3 months (95%CI 17.1-31.6 months) for those treated with VCDD. In both arms combined, median PFS was 26.3 vs 21.9 months for those aged <75 vs ≥75 yrs, and not reached, 21.8 months and 19.9 months for those with ISS stage I, II and III, respectively. 19% of patients in the VCD group and 16% of patients in the VCDD group ceased therapy early, predominantly due to adverse events or death. SAEs during the induction period occurred in 44% and 52% of patients in the VCD and VCDD arms, respectively. There were 13 patients with SAEs due to infection in the VCD group and 20 in the VCDD group. Grade 3 or 4 peripheral neuropathy was uncommon, with only one case in the VCD arm. Conclusions The VCD schedule as detailed in this study appears efficacious, well tolerated and deliverable to an elderly myeloma population. The addition of daratumumab does not compromise chemotherapy delivery and may improve PFS. Formal interim analysis of the trial data will be presented at the meeting. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Mollee: Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of D rectors or advisory committees;BMS/Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Caelum: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Reynolds: Novartis AG: Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Janowski: Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS/ Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AstraZenica: Consultancy. Quach: Amgen, Celgene, karyopharm, GSK, Janssen Cilag, Sanofi.: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GlaxoSmithKline, Karyopharm, Amgen, Celgene, Janssen Cilag: Honoraria;GlaxoSmithKline, Karyopharm, Amgen, Celgene, Janssen Cilag: Consultancy;Amgen, sanofi, celgene, Karyopharm, GSK: Research Funding. Campbell: Amgen, Novartis, Roche, Janssen, Celgene (BMS): Research Funding;AstraZeneca, Janssen, Roche, Amgen, CSL Behring, Novartis: Consultancy. Gibbs: Janssen, BMS/Celgene, Amgen, Takeda, Pfizer, Caelum, Abbvie and Eidos: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. D'Rozario: Abbvie: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS/ Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Wallington-Beddoe: Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Weber: Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Spencer: Celgene, Janssen and Takeda: Speakers Bureau;AbbVie, Celgene, Haemalogix, Janssen, Sanofi, SecuraBio, Specialised Therapeutics Australia, Servier and Takeda: Consultancy;Amgen, Celgene, Haemalogix, Janssen, Servier and Takeda: Research Funding;AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Haemalogix, Janssen, Sanofi, SecuraBio, Specialised Therapeutics Australia, Servier and Takeda: Honoraria. OffLabel Disclosure: Daratumumab as initial treatment of myeloma

20.
Reproductive Sciences ; 28(SUPPL 1):311A-311A, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1329475
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL