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1.
New Zealand Journal of Medical Laboratory Science ; 76(2):52-53, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003459
2.
Mil Med ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1948381

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After over 20 years of war in the Middle East, orthopedic injuries have been among the most prevalent combat-related injuries, accounting for 14% of all surgical procedures at Role 2/3 (R2/R3) facilities according to the DoD Trauma Registry. To further delineate the role of the deployed orthopedic surgeon on the modern battlefield, a retrospective review was performed highlighting both quantitative and qualitative analysis factors associated with orthopedic surgical care during the war in the Middle East. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of orthopedic surgeons in the Middle East from 2001 to 2021. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Embase databases using a two-reviewer strategy. Articles were compiled and reviewed using Covidence. Inclusion criteria included journal articles focusing on orthopedic injuries sustained during the Global War on Terror (GWoT) in an adult U.S. Military population. In the event of a conflict, a third author would determine the relevance of the article. For the remaining articles, a full-text review was conducted to extract relevant predetermined quantitative data, and the Delphi consensus method was then utilized to highlight relevant qualitative themes. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 1,226 potentially relevant articles. In all, 40 studies ultimately met the eligibility criteria. With the consultation of previously deployed orthopedic surgeons at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a retrospective thematic analysis of the 40 studies revealed five themes encompassing the orthopedic surgeons experience throughout GWoT. These themes include unique mechanisms of orthopedic injury compared to previous war injuries due to novel weaponry, differences in interventions depending on R2 versus R3 locations, differences in injuries from those seen in civilian settings, the maintained emphasis on humanitarian aspect of an orthopedic surgeon's mission, and lastly relation of pre-deployment training to perceived deployed success of the orthopedic surgeons. From this extensive review, we found that explosive mechanisms of injury were greatly increased when compared to previous conflicts and were the etiology for the majority of orthopedic injuries sustained. With the increase of complex explosive injuries in the setting of improved body armor and overall survival, R2/3 facilities showed an increased demand for orthopedic intervention including debridement, amputations, and external fixation. Combat injuries sustained during the GWoT differ in the complications, management, and complexity when compared to civilian trauma. "Humanitarian" cases made up a significant number of operative cases for the deployed orthopedic surgeon. Lastly, heterogeneous training opportunities were available prior to deployment (fellowship, combat extremity surgical courses, and dedicated pre-deployment training), and the most commonly identified useful training was learning additional soft-tissue coverage techniques. CONCLUSION: These major themes indicate an emphasis on pre-deployment training and the strategic positioning of orthopedic surgeons to reflect the changing landscape of musculoskeletal trauma care. Moving forward, these authors recommend analyzing the comfort and perceived capability of orthopedic surgeons in these unique military environments to best prepare for a changing operational format and the possibility of future peer-peer conflicts that will likely lead to a lack of medical evacuation and prolonged field care.

3.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269596, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 1995, the CDC recommended one-dose routine varicella immunization for children <12 years of age, expanding its recommendation to two doses in 2006. Today, with widespread varicella vaccination coverage, an estimated 3.5 million cases of varicella, 9,000 hospitalizations, and 100 deaths are prevented annually in the United States. Since varicella infections are now uncommon, health care providers (HCPs) may not recognize varicella infections and may prescribe inappropriate treatment. METHODS: An online survey of HCPs was conducted to assess recognition and management of varicella infections. Responses to eight varicella vignettes describing patients with varying varicella symptoms were analyzed and descriptive analyses performed. Stratified analysis comparing responses of those licensed before and in/after 1996 was also performed. RESULTS: 153 HCPs (50 nurse practitioners, 103 doctors) completed the survey. Mean age of respondents was 44 years. 62% were female, and 82% were licensed before 1996. Varicella infection was correctly diagnosed 79% of the time. HCPs correctly recognized uncomplicated varicella vignettes 85% of the time versus 61% of the time for complicated varicella vignettes. Antibiotics were recommended 17% of the time and antivirals 18% of the time, of which 25% and 69% (respectively) were not appropriate per guidelines. HCPs licensed before 1996 were better able to recognize varicella compared to those licensed later, but prescribed more antimicrobials medications to treat varicella. CONCLUSIONS: Although most HCPs recognized varicella infection, a sizable proportion could not recognize cases with complications, and some of the varicella cases were inappropriately treated with antibiotics and/or antivirals. Additional HCP training and high vaccination coverage are important strategies to avoid inaccurate diagnoses and minimize unnecessary exposure to antimicrobial/antiviral therapies.


Subject(s)
Chickenpox , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Chickenpox/diagnosis , Chickenpox/drug therapy , Chickenpox/prevention & control , Chickenpox Vaccine/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , United States , Vaccination
4.
Diabetic Medicine ; 39(SUPPL 1):99, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1868602

ABSTRACT

Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive virtual carbohydrate counting course on glycaemic indicators in people with type 1 diabetes. Methods: An observational study of glycaemic management following a virtual carbohydrate counting course, comprising of a weekly two hour session over three weeks on Microsoft Teams. Key metrics monitored from flash glucose monitoring (FGM) at baseline, three and six months: time in range (TIR), time below range (TBR) estimated glycated haemoglobin (eHbA1c) and glucose variability (GV). A paired two sample for means T-test was used to determine statistical significance. Results: 26 participants completed the course (14 male, 12 female). Baseline and three month data was available for 17 participants (11 male, 6 female). Six month data was available for 14 participants, (9 male, 5 female). Significant improvements were observed at six months for GV (p = 0.05). No significant differences were observed at three months. Conclusions: One metric (GV) showed significant improvement at six months. The lack of significant improvements in other parameters and at three months could be related to many factors. There is a paucity of research on virtual carbohydrate counting courses for comparison purposes. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends offering structured education to all people with type 1 diabetes. The option of a virtual course has allowed for continuation of education during the covid-19 pandemic, which otherwise would have been absent. Further research is required to inform clinical practice and service development and provide further insight into lack of improvement in some parameters.

5.
Non-conventional in English | National Technical Information Service, Grey literature | ID: grc-753558

ABSTRACT

Retinal detachment (RD) is a prevalent cause of blindness that is common after ocular injury to military personnel. Permanent vision loss occurs due to death of photoreceptors and formation of excessive scar tissue, known as proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). There are no effective pharmaceuticals to prevent these problems. The inflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is produced at high levels in RD and PVR, as well as in excitotoxic (NMDA-mediated) damage, which is important in blast injury. We tested the ability of different clinically-relevant MIF inhibitors to block photoreceptor death after NMDA damage in a chick excitotoxic retinal damage model. These inhibitors, ibudilast, AV1013, and CPSI-1306, are well tolerated in the eye, and treatment with the maximum dose of each drug does not show retinal toxicity. Ibudilast pretreatment significantly reduced the number of TUNEL positive cells in the retina after NMDA damage. CPSI-1306 also reduced TUNEL. AV1013 had no effect. Ibudilast and AV1013 also blocked epithelial mesenchymal transition in the invitro PVR model.

6.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S360, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746480

ABSTRACT

Background. The aim of this pragmatic, embedded adaptive trial was to measure the effectiveness of subcutaneous sarilumab in addition to an evolving standard of care for clinical management of inpatients with moderate to severe COVID-19 disease (NCT04359901). The study is also a real-world demonstration of the realization of a prospective learning healthcare system. Methods. Two-arm, randomized, open-label controlled 5-center trial comparing standard care alone to standard care (SOC), which evolved over time, with addition of subcutaneous sarilumab (200 mg or 400 mg anti-IL6R) among hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 not requiring mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was 14-day incidence of intubation or death. The trial used a randomized play-the-winner design and was fully embedded within the EHR system, including the adaptive randomization process. Results. Among 417 patients screened, 162 were eligible based on chart review, 53 consented, and 50 were evaluated for the primary endpoint of intubation or death ( >30% of eligible patients enrolled) (Figure 1). After the second interim review, the unblinded Data Monitoring Committee recommended that the study be stopped due to concern for safety: a high probability that rates of intubation or death were higher with addition of sarilumab to SOC (92.6%), and a very low probability (3.4%) that sarilumab would be found to be superior. Conclusion. This randomized trial of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and requiring supplemental oxygen but not mechanical ventilation found no evidence of benefit from subcutaneous sarilumab in addition to an evolving standard-of-care. The numbers of patients and events were too low to allow independent conclusions to be drawn, but this study contributes valuable information about the role of subcutaneous IL-6 inhibition in the treatment of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The major innovation of this trial was the advancement of embedded, point-of-care clinical trials for FDA-approved drugs;this represents a realization of the learning healthcare system. Methods developed and piloted during the conduct of this trial can be used in future investigations to speed the advancement of clinical science.

7.
MEDLINE; 2022.
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-329653

ABSTRACT

Neutralizing antibodies targeting the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein have shown a great preventative/therapeutic potential. Here, we report a rapid and efficient strategy for the development and design of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing humanized nanobody constructs with sub-nanomolar affinities and nanomolar potencies. CryoEM-based structural analysis of the nanobodies in complex with spike revealed two distinct binding modes. The most potent nanobody, RBD-1-2G(NCATS-BL8125), tolerates the N501Y RBD mutation and remains capable of neutralizing the B.1.1.7 (Alpha) variant. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural basis for understanding the neutralization process of nanobodies exclusively focused on the spike-ACE2 interface with and without the N501Y mutation on RBD. A primary human airway air-lung interface (ALI) ex vivo model showed that RBD-1-2G-Fc antibody treatment was effective at reducing viral burden following WA1 and B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 infections. Therefore, this presented strategy will serve as a tool to mitigate the threat of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.

9.
PubMed; 2020.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-329426

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 spike trimer is the primary antigen for several serology assays critical to determining the extent of SARS-CoV-2 exposure in the population. Until stable cell lines are developed to increase the titer of this secreted protein in mammalian cell culture, the low yield of spike protein produced from transient transfection of HEK293 cells will be a limiting factor for these assays. To improve the yield of spike protein and support the high demand for antigens in serology assays, we investigated several recombinant protein expression variables by altering the incubation temperature, harvest time, chromatography strategy, and final protein manipulation. Through this investigation, we developed a simplified and robust purification strategy that consistently yields 5 mg of protein per liter of expression culture for two commonly used forms of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We show that these proteins form well-behaved stable trimers and are consistently functional in serology assays across multiple protein production lots.

10.
Blood ; 138:2321, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582311

ABSTRACT

Background Based on early evidence of a high rate of coronavirus mortality in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) undergoing intensive chemotherapy (IC), the national health service (NHS) in the United Kingdom temporarily made venetoclax available as an alternative therapy, with the aim of reducing both mortality and healthcare resource use. From late April 2020, venetoclax was available to patients aged >16y with NPM1 mutation without FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD), patients aged >50y with NPM1, IDH1 or IDH2 mutations (regardless of FLT3 status) and patients aged >60y without favourable-risk cytogenetics. Venetoclax could be given with either azacitidine or low-dose cytarabine (LDAC), with the latter recommended mainly for patients with NPM1 mutation. We report a health-system-wide real world data collection for toxicity and patient outcomes across 65 NHS Hospitals. Methods Each patient was registered on a central NHS database. Clinicians certified that their patient met the above criteria, had not received previous AML treatment, and was fit for induction chemotherapy. Anonymised data were retrospectively collected by treating physicians. Venetoclax dose, duration and toxicity information was requested for the first 4 cycles of therapy. Response definitions were as per European Leukaemia Network (ELN) guidelines. A total of 870 patients have been registered on the scheme, with outcomes reported here for those with follow-up information at a data cut on 1st August 2021. Results There were 301 patients, median age 72y (range 34 - 90) with 62% male. The majority (81%) had an ECOG performance status of 0-1. AML was secondary to a previous haematological disorder in 33%, therapy-related in 10% and de novo in the remaining 57%. MRC cytogenetic risk was intermediate in 70% and adverse in 27%. NPM1 mutations were detected in 28% and FLT3-ITD in 12%. Next-generation sequencing results were available in 86% of patients, which detected mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 in 28%, ASXL1 in 20%, RUNX1 in 17% and TP53 in 12%. The ELN risk was favourable for 23%, intermediate for 30% and adverse for 44%. A majority received venetoclax in combination with azacitidine (85%), with the remaining 15% receiving LDAC. The LDAC cohort was enriched for de novo AML (76% vs 54%) and NPM1-mutated disease (56% vs 23%). Most patients (81%) followed the recommended initial schedule of venetoclax 100mg daily for 28 days in combination with posaconazole or voriconazole. Patients spent a median 14 days in hospital in cycle 1, then a median of 0 days for cycles 2-4. In cycles 1, 2, 3 and 4, the median number of days for recovery of neutrophils to >0.5x10 9/L was 33, 25, 24 and 14 respectively, and the median number of days to recovery of platelets to >50x10 9/L was 22, 3, 0 (no drop below 50) and 0. The composite complete remission (CR) / CR with incomplete haematological recovery (CRi) rate was 70%. MRD data is being collected. The best response was morphological leukaemia free state (MLFS) in 2%, partial remission in 7% and refractory disease in 11%. CR/CRi was higher in de novo (78%) compared to secondary AML (57%, p=0.02);NPM1 mutated (78% vs 67%, p=0.02) and IDH1/IDH2 mutated disease (85% vs 62%, p=0.02). ELN favourable risk patients had the highest CR/CRi rate (85%, intermediate 71%, adverse 60%, p=0.01). Median follow-up was 8.2 months (95%CI 7.8 - 9.0) with median overall survival (OS) 12.8 months (95%CI 10.9 - not reached). Mortality at day 30 was 5.7% and day 60 was 8.4%. 12-month overall survival was 51%, increasing to 71% in those who achieved CR/CRi. Survival was poorer in secondary (HR 1.9, p <0.01) and therapy-related AML (HR 2.1, p=0.02), better in NPM1 mutated (HR 0.6, p=0.02) and IDH mutated (HR 0.5, p=0.02) disease and poorer with TP53 mutation (HR 2.0, p=0.01). Overall survival did not differ for patients treated with LDAC compared to azacitidine (HR 1.1, p=0.7). Conclusion This large real-world study demonstrates CR/CRi and survival rates comparable to those reported in prospective clinical trials. Importantly, during t e COVID-19 pandemic, the adoption of venetoclax regimens permitted the great majority of treatment to be delivered as an outpatient with significant resource saving at a time of critically constrained inpatient resources. The data support prospective comparisons of venetoclax-based regimens to IC in fit adults with AML particularly in older patients with de novo AML, NPM1-mutated and IDH-mutated disease. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Belsham: Celgene: Other: meeting attendance;Abbvie: Other: meeting attendance. Khan: Abbvie: Honoraria;Astellas: Honoraria;Takeda: Honoraria;Jazz: Honoraria;Gilead: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria. Khwaja: Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Astellas: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Abbvie: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau. Latif: Kite: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Jazz: Consultancy, Honoraria;Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy, Honoraria;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria;Astellas: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Takeda UK: Speakers Bureau. Loke: Pfizer: Honoraria;Amgen: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria;Novartis: Other: Travel;Daichi Sankyo: Other: Travel. Murthy: Abbvie: Other: support to attend educational conferences. Smith: ARIAD: Honoraria;Pfizer: Speakers Bureau;Daiichi Sankyo: Speakers Bureau. Whitmill: Daiichi-sankyo: Other: travel fees;EHA in stockholm: Other: conference support. Craddock: Novartis Pharmaceuticals: Other: Advisory Board;Celgene/BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Dillon: Shattuck Labs: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Jazz: Other: Education events;Pfizer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: educational events;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Session chair (paid to institution), Speakers Bureau;Menarini: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Astellas: Consultancy, Other: Educational Events, Speakers Bureau;Amgen: Other: Research support (paid to institution);Abbvie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Research Support, Educational Events.

11.
Blood ; 138:1254, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582298

ABSTRACT

Background Early data suggest that patients undergoing salvage chemotherapy for relapsed or refractory (R/R) acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have poor outcomes if infected with SARS-CoV-2, and nosocomial transmission has been a major problem worldwide. Gilteritinib is effective in R/R FLT3 mutated AML, is significantly less immunosuppressive and does not require hospital admission, however at the start of the pandemic this was not yet approved for routine use in all countries. In the United Kingdom, the National Health Service (NHS) made gilteritinib available as an emergency measure from late April 2020 to patients aged >16y with R/R FLT3 mutated AML, with the aim of reducing both mortality and healthcare resource use. We report a health-system-wide real world data collection for toxicity and patient outcomes across 27 NHS Hospitals. Methods Each patient was registered on a central NHS database, with clinicians certifying that their patient met the above criteria. Anonymised data were retrospectively collected by treating physicians. Gilteritinib dose, duration and toxicity information was requested for the first 4 cycles of therapy. Response definitions were as per European Leukaemia Network (ELN) guidelines. A total of 81 patients have been registered on the scheme, with outcomes reported here for those with follow-up information at a data cut on 1st August 2021. Results Fifty patients were included with a median age of 59y (range 19 - 77) and 50% male. The majority (83%) had an ECOG performance status of 0-1. AML was secondary to a previous haematological disorder in 12%, therapy-related in 4% and de novo in the remaining 84%. The disease was refractory to the last therapy in 38%. Most patients had previously received 1 (65%) or 2 (33%) lines of therapy, including intensive chemotherapy in a majority (86%). A FLT3 inhibitor had previously been administered to 45% and 35% were post allogeneic transplant. The FLT3 mutation was an internal tandem duplication (ITD) in 80% and tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) mutation in 22%. NPM1 mutations were detected in 34%. Next-generation sequencing results were available for 94% of patients, with mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 in 12.5%, ASXL1 in 2%, RUNX1 in 21% and no TP53 mutations. Patients spent a median 3.5 days in hospital in cycle 1, 0 days in cycles 2 and 3 and 1 day in cycle 4. In cycles 1, 2, 3 and 4, the median number of days of grade 4 neutropenia was 18, 7, 7.5, and 6.5 respectively, and the grade 4 thrombocytopenia was 2, 7, 0.5 and 0.5. The composite complete remission (CR) / CR with incomplete haematological recovery (CRi) rate was 27%. MRD data is being collected. The best response was morphological leukaemia free state (MLFS) in 4%, partial remission (PR) in 25% and refractory disease in 38%. The rate of combined CR/CRi did not differ in those with previous exposure to FLT3 inhibitors (23% vs 32%, p=0.6) or with past allogeneic transplant (29% vs 27%, p=0.3). There were no CR/CRi in patients with adverse cytogenetic risk. Median follow-up was 10.5 months (95%CI 7.3 - 12.3) with median overall survival (OS) 6.7 months (95%CI 4.5 - not reached). Mortality at day 30 was 0% and day 60 was 14%. 12-month overall survival was 38%. Patients who achieved a CR/CRi had a 12-month OS of 83%, and for PR this was 35%. Survival did not differ in those with previous FLT3 inhibitor exposure (HR 1.0, p>0.9) or allogeneic transplant (HR 0.63, p=0.3). Seven patients (14%) so far have been bridged with gilteritinib to allogeneic transplant. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that gilteritinib is well tolerated and clinically active in adults with relapsed FLT3 mutated AML. Importantly, during the COVID-19 pandemic, its availability has permitted the great majority of treatment to be delivered as an outpatient with significant resource saving at a time of critically constrained inpatient resources. Patients who achieve CR/CRi have good short-term outcomes and are able to proceed to a potentially curative allogeneic stem cell transplant. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Belsham: Celgene: Other: meeting attendance;Abbvie: Other: meeting attendance. Byrne: Incyte: Honoraria. Khan: Abbvie: Honoraria;Astellas: Honoraria;Takeda: Honoraria;Jazz: Honoraria;Gilead: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria. Khwaja: Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Astellas: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Abbvie: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau. Latif: Kite: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Jazz: Consultancy, Honoraria;Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy, Honoraria;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria;Astellas: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Takeda UK: Speakers Bureau. Loke: Amgen: Honoraria;Daichi Sankyo: Other: Travel Support;Janssen: Honoraria;Novartis: Other: Travel Support;Pfizer: Honoraria. Munisamy: Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Speakers Bureau;Roche: Speakers Bureau. Murthy: Abbvie: Other: support to attend educational conferences. Smith: Daiichi Sankyo: Speakers Bureau;Pfizer: Speakers Bureau;ARIAD: Honoraria. Craddock: Novartis Pharmaceuticals: Other: Advisory Board;Celgene/BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Dillon: Amgen: Other: Research support (paid to institution);Astellas: Consultancy, Other: Educational Events, Speakers Bureau;Menarini: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Session chair (paid to institution), Speakers Bureau;Pfizer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: educational events;Jazz: Other: Education events;Shattuck Labs: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Abbvie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Research Support, Educational Events.

12.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 21(SUPPL 4):864-865, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1494487

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study explores quality of life and lifestyle changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic among pre- and post- liver (LT) and kidney (KT) transplant patients across race, age, and gender. Methods: Patients listed (pre) for liver transplant (LT) or kidney transplant (KT) and recipients (post) of LT and KT were prospectively enrolled at a large single center from 5/2020 - 1/2021. Demographics were collected from the EHR. The Chicago COVID-19 Comorbidities (C3) survey was administered via phone by trained research assistants to ascertain patient knowledge about COVID-19. Chi-Square or Fisher's Exact tests were used (p<0.05). Results: A total of 310 pre- and post-LT and KT patients were enrolled (Table 1), with 187 (60%) KT patients and 122 (40%) LT patients. The mean age group for the cohort was 55-64, 104 (34%) were female, 228 (74%) were White, 45 (15%) were Black, 43 (14%) were Hispanic, and 251 (87%) had some college education. 26 (8%) patients had known COVID-19, 22 (85%) were post- LT or KT. There were no significant differences in COVID-19 diagnoses between genders or organ category (Table 2). Compared to men, women felt lonelier (Fig 1A, p=0.0159), more nervous or stressed (Fig 1C, p= 0.0138), and left their home less frequently (Fig 1B, p= 0.0006) due to the pandemic. Specifically, white men left their homes more (Fig 3C, p= 0.0092) than white women, and a higher percentage of white men “never” felt nervous or stressed (Fig 3B, p= 0.004) or were “never” lonely because of the coronavirus (Fig 3A, p=0.0321) compared to white women. Further, women ≥55 reported that their routines changed more (Fig 2A, p= 0.0041 and felt lonelier (Fig 2B, p= 0.0249) than men ≥55 because of the coronavirus. Conclusions: It has been previously demonstrated that women have shouldered a bigger mental health burden during the pandemic. Our findings show that this holds within the transplant population across age and race. Though our population is primarily male and chronically ill, that did not seem to affect behaviors and attitudes towards COVID-19. Thus, targeted social support for this particularly vulnerable population may be beneficial in closing this mental health gap. (Table Presented).

13.
Lc Gc Europe ; 33(6):284-288, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1250746

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-related laboratory shutdowns are sure to cause a myriad of problems with liquid chromatography (LC) instrumentation across the globe. Taking a systematic approach to restarting these systems will save time and money in the long run, by preventing problems that may otherwise appear in days or weeks following startup.

14.
JMIR Public Health and Surveillance ; 7(4):e25075, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Risk assessment of patients with acute COVID-19 in a telemedicine context is not well described. In settings of large numbers of patients, a risk assessment tool may guide resource allocation not only for patient care but also for maximum health care and public health benefit. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine whether a COVID-19 telemedicine risk assessment tool accurately predicts hospitalizations. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of a COVID-19 telemedicine home monitoring program serving health care workers and the community in Atlanta, Georgia, with enrollment from March 24 to May 26, 2020;the final call range was from March 27 to June 19, 2020. All patients were assessed by medical providers using an institutional COVID-19 risk assessment tool designating patients as Tier 1 (low risk for hospitalization), Tier 2 (intermediate risk for hospitalization), or Tier 3 (high risk for hospitalization). Patients were followed with regular telephone calls to an endpoint of improvement or hospitalization. Using survival analysis by Cox regression with days to hospitalization as the metric, we analyzed the performance of the risk tiers and explored individual patient factors associated with risk of hospitalization. RESULTS: Providers using the risk assessment rubric assigned 496 outpatients to tiers: Tier 1, 237 out of 496 (47.8%);Tier 2, 185 out of 496 (37.3%);and Tier 3, 74 out of 496 (14.9%). Subsequent hospitalizations numbered 3 out of 237 (1.3%) for Tier 1, 15 out of 185 (8.1%) for Tier 2, and 17 out of 74 (23%) for Tier 3. From a Cox regression model with age of 60 years or older, gender, and reported obesity as covariates, the adjusted hazard ratios for hospitalization using Tier 1 as reference were 3.74 (95% CI 1.06-13.27;P=.04) for Tier 2 and 10.87 (95% CI 3.09-38.27;P<.001) for Tier 3. CONCLUSIONS: A telemedicine risk assessment tool prospectively applied to an outpatient population with COVID-19 identified populations with low, intermediate, and high risk of hospitalization.

15.
LC-GC North America ; 37(7):379-381, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-831802

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-related laboratory shutdowns are sure to cause a myriad of problems with liquid chromatography (LC) instrumentation across the globe. Taking a systematic approach to restarting these systems will save money and time in the long run by preventing problems that may otherwise appear in days or weeks following startup. © 2020, UBM Medica Periodical Publication. All rights reserved.

16.
New Zealand Journal of Medical Laboratory Science ; 74(2):69, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-731014
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