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International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health ; 10(2):269-277, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20243689

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an epidemic that has greatly affected the daily life of people around the world. This epidemic, in addition to affecting lives, also affects other matters such as the economy or government administration that need to find ways to reduce the epidemic rate. That is to provide adequate quality vaccines for the people of the country. Finally, the government finds measures to stop the spread of COVID-19. Objectives: This study aimed to assess an acceptance to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Materials and Methods: Intention to be vaccinated against COVID-19 was measured with a question A"When a vaccine for COVID-19 is ready for you, will you get vaccinated?A" Response options were A"yes, A" A"not sureA" and A"no.A" Participants who responded A"not sureA" or A"noA" were asked to provide a reason. Results: A total of 400 responses were received. Overall, 38.5% (n = 154) of participants intended to get vaccinated, 29.5% (n = 117) were unsure, and 32.25% (n = 129) were not planning to get vaccinated. Factors that are independently related to vaccine hesitancy (A"not sureA" or A"yesA" response) include being male, risk perception of getting COVID-19, confidence in the government in handling the pandemic. Conclusion: A total of 400 participants, in the study, 38.5% (n = 154) of participants intended to get vaccinated, 29.5% (n = 117) were unsure, and 32.25% (n = 129) were not planning to get vaccinated. Male participants had a higher chance to refuse to vaccinate more than female 2.69 times. Predictive factors for COVID-19 vaccination were risk perception of contracting COVID-19 and lack of confidence in the government handling the pandemic of COVID-19.

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