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1.
Germs ; 12(1):1-5, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1801717

ABSTRACT

The only factor statistically significantly associated with anxiety was job dedication, where a higher level of job dedication was associated with decreased likelihood of the worker having high levels of anxiety (odds ratio (OR)=0.545;95% confidence interval (CI): 0.301;0.990) (Table 1). [...]participation in the study was voluntary and 95% of our participants were females, which may indicate a self-selection bias. [...]being a cross-sectional survey, our research is only a snapshot in time. [...]we wish to highlight the need for advanced interventions in times of crisis to address mental-health concerns of employees and to safeguard their emotional and psychological wellbeing.

2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
4.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e26282, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frontline health care workers are experiencing a myriad of physical and psychosocial challenges amid the COVID-19 pandemic. There is growing recognition that digital technologies have the potential to improve the well-being of frontline workers. However, there has been limited development of wellness interventions using mobile health (mHealth) technology. More importantly, little research has been conducted on how frontline workers perceive mHealth-based support to promote their well-being. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore frontline workers' experience of conventional psychological wellness programs and their perceptions of the usefulness of mHealth apps and features for promoting well-being. It also sought to identify factors that could potentially influence uptake and retention of an mHealth-based wellness program. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews using purposive sampling with frontline workers involved in the COVID-19 response. Various visual materials, collated from existing mHealth app features, were presented to facilitate discussion. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis based on grounded theory was undertaken. Themes were subsequently mapped to key nudge strategies-those commonly used for mHealth development-to assess participants' preferences for particular features and their reasoning. RESULTS: A total of 42 frontline workers participated in 12 one-on-one interviews or focus group discussions. Frontline workers generally had a limited ability to identify their own psychological problems and liked the reminders functionality of the app to track their mood over time. A personalized goal-setting feature (ie, tailoring) and in-app resources were generally valued, while frequent coaching and messages (ie, framing) were seen as a distraction. The majority of participants desired a built-in chat function with a counselor (ie, guidance) for reasons of accessibility and protection of privacy. Very few participants appreciated a gamification function. Frontline workers commonly reported the need for ongoing social support and desired access to an in-app peer support community (ie, social influence). There were, however, concerns regarding potential risks from virtual peer interactions. Intrinsic motivational factors, mHealth app technicality, and tangible rewards were identified as critical for uptake and retention. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the potential of mHealth apps with relevant features to be used as wellness tools by frontline health care workers. Future work should focus on developing a nonintrusive and personalized mHealth app with in-app counseling, peer support to improve well-being, and tangible and extrinsic rewards to foster continued use.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e045949, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143049

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health, psychological and socioeconomic vulnerabilities of low-wage migrant workers have been magnified in the COVID-19 pandemic, especially in high-income receiving countries such as Singapore. We aimed to understand migrant worker concerns and coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic to address these during the crisis and inform on comprehensive support needed after the crisis. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were carried out with migrant workers diagnosed with COVID-19. The participants were recruited from a COVID-19 mass quarantine facility in Singapore through a purposive sampling approach. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis performed to derive themes in their collective experience during the crisis. RESULTS: Three theme categories were derived from 27 interviews: migrant worker concerns during COVID-19, coping during COVID-19 and priorities after COVID-19. Major stressors in the crisis included the inability to continue providing for their families when work is disrupted, their susceptibility to infection in crowded dormitories, the shock of receiving the COVID-19 diagnosis while asymptomatic, as well as the isolating conditions of the quarantine environment. The workers coped by keeping in contact with their families, accessing healthcare, keeping updated with the news and continuing to practise their faith and religion. They looked forward to a return to normalcy after the crisis with keeping healthy and having access to healthcare as new priorities. CONCLUSION: We identified coping strategies employed by the workers in quarantine, many of which were made possible through the considered design of care and service delivery in mass quarantine facilities in Singapore. These can be adopted in the set-up of other mass quarantine facilities around the world to support the health and mental well-being of those quarantined. Our findings highlight the importance of targeted policy intervention for migrant workers, in areas such as housing and working environments, equitable access to healthcare, and social protection during and after this crisis.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Transients and Migrants/psychology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Singapore
6.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(2): 139-145, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to study anxiety and burnout among Division of Radiological Sciences (RADSC) staff during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify potential risk and protective factors. These outcomes were compared with non-RADSC staff. METHODS: A cross-sectional online study was conducted between 12 March and 20 July 2020 in the largest public tertiary hospital receiving COVID-19 cases. Burnout and anxiety were assessed with the Physician Work-Life Scale and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, respectively. Workplace factors were examined as potential risk and protective factors using multivariable ordinary least squares regression analyses, adjusting for pertinent demographic characteristics. RESULTS: RADSC staff (n = 180) and non-RADSC staff (n = 1458) demonstrated moderate-to-severe anxiety rates of 6.7 and 13.2 % and burnout rates of 17.8 and 23.9 %, respectively. RADSC staff reported significantly lower anxiety (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 3.7 vs 4.9 ± 4.5; P-value < 0.05), burnout (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 0.7 vs 2.1 ± 0.8; P-value < 0.01), increased teamwork (82.2% vs 74.1%; P-value < 0.05) and fewer night shifts (36.7% vs 41.1%; P-value < 0.01). Among RADSC staff, higher job dedication was associated with lower anxiety (b (95% CI) = -0.28 (-0.45, -0.11)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = -0.07 (-0.11,-0.04)), while longer than usual working hours was associated with increased anxiety (b (95% CI) = 1.42 (0.36, 2.45)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = 0.28 (0.09, 0.48)). CONCLUSIONS: A proportion of RADSC staff reported significant burnout and anxiety, although less compared to the larger hospital cohort. Measures to prevent longer than usual work hours and increase feelings of enthusiasm and pride in one's job may further reduce the prevalence of anxiety problems and burnout in radiology departments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
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