Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
2.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-1007, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967395

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are commonly treated with immunosuppressive agents. Following the novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, these patients received early the currently EMA approved vaccines. Data on efficacy and safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination on this population are lacking. Methods: Greek IBD patients, from 10 tertiary referral centres, who had completed the initial vaccination protocol with the available anti-COVID-19 vaccines (BNT162b2, mRNA-1273, Ad26.CoV2.S, ChAdOx1) at least two weeks before enrolment, were prospectively studied. Demographic and safety data were collected and blood samples were drawn for serum Anti-S1 IgG measurement [Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2 QuantiVac ELISA (IgG)]. Results: In total 403 IBD patients (59% Crohn's disease, median age 45 years, 53% male) and 124 healthy controls (HC) were included (Table 1). Antibody testing was conducted after a median of 31 (IQR, 23-46) days post-vaccination. Following a full vaccination regimen, 98% of IBD patients seroconverted (anti-S1 IgG³11 RU/ml). In total, IBD patients had lower anti-S1 levels than HC (RU/ ml 108 vs 133 RU/ml, P=0.00009) Administration of mRNA vaccines resulted in higher seroconversion rates and higher antibody titers than viral vector ones (98.6% vs 93.6%, P= 0.02 and 111.2 RU/ml vs 76 RU/ml, P<0.0001, respectively). Treatment with vedolizumab monotherapy was associated with higher antibody levels than anti-TNFα or ustekinumab monotherapy (P=0.02 and P=0.03). Longer timing between vaccination and antibody measurement was independently associated with impaired vaccine response. In multivariable analysis, specifically in mRNA-vaccinated cohort, older age, anti-TNFα treatment and treatment with biologics plus IMMs were significantly associated with lower antibody response (P=0.01, P=0.008, and P=0.02 respectively). Patients with prior COVID-19 infection showed numerically higher levels of antibodies. All vaccines were safe in IBD patients. Conclusions: Patients with IBD have high seroconversion rates to anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. However, they demonstrate impaired antibody responses compared to HC. Patients receiving viral vector vaccines, and those on anti-TNFα or combination treatment may have further response impairment and it is important to consider booster vaccination in those low-response groups. (Table Presented)

3.
Journal of Crohn's and Colitis ; 16:i581, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1722360

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak was declared as a pandemic in March 2020;this prompted the need for rapid vaccine development. Currently four EMA approved vaccines exist but their efficacy and safety data on patients with Inflammatory Bowel diseases are limited. Methods: Greek IBD patients, from 10 tertiary referral centres, who had completed the initial vaccination protocol with the available anti-COVID-19 vaccines at least two weeks before enrolment, were prospectively studied. Demographic and safety data were collected and blood samples were drawn for serum Anti-S1 IgG measurement [Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2 QuantiVac ELISA (IgG)]. Results: In total 403 IBD patients (59% Crohn's disease, median age 45 years, 53% male) and 124 healthy controls (HC) were included (Table 1). Antibody testing was conducted after a median of 31 (IQR, 23-46) days post-vaccination. Following a full vaccination regimen, 98% of IBD patients seroconverted (anti-S1 IgG≥11 RU/ ml). Administration of mRNA vaccines resulted in higher seroconversion rates and higher antibody titers than viral vector ones (98.6% vs 93.6%, P=0.02 and 111.2 RU/ml vs 76 RU/ml, P<0.0001, respectively). In total, IBD patients had lower anti-S1 levels than HC (RU/ ml 108 vs 133 RU/ml, P=0.00009). IBD patients without immunosuppression had higher antibody titers than immunocompromised patients (P=0.012). In univariable analysis, older age, longer time since vaccination, and treatment with corticosteroids, immunomodulators, anti-TNFα or combination therapy were associated with lower anti- S1 titers. In contrast, higher anti-S1 levels were detected in patients on vedolizumab monotherapy or non-immunosuppressive treatment. In multivariable analysis, only age, time since vaccination, and anti- TNFα therapy remained significant (P=0.011, P=0.002, and P=0.013 respectively). Treatment with vedolizumab monotherapy was associated with higher antibody levels than anti-TNFα or ustekinumab monotherapy (P=0.023 and P=0.032). Patients with prior COVID-19 infection showed numerically higher levels of Abs. All vaccines were safe in IBD patients. Conclusion: Patients with IBD have high seroconversion rates to anti- SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, with mRNA vaccines being more efficacious. However, IBD patients have impaired response to vaccination comparing to HC. Lower antibody responses were observed in patients who received viral vector vaccines, in older patients, and in those on anti- TNFα treatment. It is important to consider booster vaccination in those low-response groups.

4.
Pathophysiology ; 28(4): 496-500, 2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502483

ABSTRACT

The newly identified human coronavirus was named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), based on a detailed analysis of clinical manifestation. It was reported that blood type O individuals were less likely to become infected by SARS-CoV, while blood type A individuals have an increased risk of severe illness. The Forssman antigen, or Forssman glycolipid synthase (FS), was first described in 1911 by John Frederick Forssman. Blood type A/B glycosyltransferases (AT/BTs) and Forssman glycolipid synthase (FS) are encoded by the evolutionarily related ABO (A/B alleles) and GBGT1 genes. In this article, based on published studies about the pathogenesis of the COVID-19, we hypothesize the possible relationship between the COVID-19 infection and rare blood type systems, such as the Forssman antigen system.

5.
United European Gastroenterology Journal ; 9(SUPPL 8):429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1490934

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 has evolved into a global health crisis, variably affecting the management of patients with chronic illnesses. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may represent a vulnerable population due to the frequent administration of immune-modifying treatments. Aims & Methods: We aimed to depict the natural history of COVID-19 infection in Greek patients with IBD at a nationwide level via the unbiased reporting of all cases that were registered during the first and second waves of the pandemic. Following a national call from the Hellenic Society for the study of IBD, we enrolled all IBD patients with established diagnoses of COVID-19. Clinical and epidemiological data, including COVID-19 modifying factors and IBDassociated therapies, were analyzed against adverse outcomes (hospitalization, ICU admission, and death). Results: We identified 160 IBD patients who were diagnosed with COVID- 19 during the study period (male:56.9%;mean age=41.6 [SD=14.8] years;CD:64.4%). Adverse outcomes were reported in 34 patients (21.3%), including 3 ICU admissions (1.9%) and 2 deaths (1.3%). As shown in the table prognostic factor for adverse events due to COVID-19 in IBD patients were sought. Through multivariate logistic regression age (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1-1.08) and dyspnoea at presentation (OR=8.72, 95% CI=2.14-35.57) were identified as negative prognostic factors while there was also a tendency for fever at presentation (OR=3.23, 95% CI=0.91-11.43). In contrast, treatment with biologics, in particular anti-TNF agents, exerted a protective effect against an unfavorable course COVID-19 (OR=0.33, 95% CI=0.13-0.84). Patients on subcutaneous biologics were more likely to halt treatment due to the infection as compared to those on intravenous medications. Conclusion: IBD patients who developed COVID-19 had a benign course with adverse outcomes being scarce. Treatment with biologics had a beneficial effect, supporting the continuation of therapy during the pandemic. (Table Presented).

6.
J Clin Med ; 10(13)2021 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288921

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to estimate the immunogenic effect of mRNA vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. This study included 510 participants who received mRNA vaccine. The measurement of anti-COVID-19 antibodies was performed using the Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgG quantitative assay (Abbott). Overall, mean titer of anti-Spike antibodies was 19,319.2 ± 1787.5 AU/mL. Vaccination induced a robust immunogenic response in those previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with non-infected subjects. Additionally, individuals that were asymptomatic after vaccination produced lower levels of antibodies compared to feverish individuals. In conclusion, remarkably high levels of anti-Spike COVID-19 antibodies were observed after vaccination.

7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244035

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have shown that COVID-19 leads to thrombotic complications, which have been associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Neutrophils are the largest population of white blood cells and play a pivotal role in innate immunity. During an infection, neutrophils migrate from circulation to the infection site, contributing to killing pathogens. This mechanism is regulated by chemokines such as IL-8. Moreover, it was shown that neutrophils play an important role in thromboinflammation. Through a diverse repertoire of mechanisms, neutrophils, apart from directly killing pathogens, are able to activate the formation of thrombi. In COVID-19 patients, neutrophil activation promotes neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, platelet aggregation, and cell damage. Furthermore, neutrophils participate in the pathogenesis of endothelitis. Overall, this review summarizes recent progress in research on the pathogenesis of COVID-19, highlighting the role of the prothrombotic action of neutrophils in NET formation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Extracellular Traps/virology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Kidney/cytology , Kidney/immunology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Lung/cytology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL