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1.
Life (Basel) ; 11(12)2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572551

ABSTRACT

Understanding whether SARS-CoV-2 could infect cells and tissues handled during ART is crucial for risk mitigation, especially during the implantation window when either endometrial biopsies are often practiced for endometrial receptivity assessment or embryo transfer is performed. To address this question, this review analyzed current knowledge of the field and retrospectively examined the gene expression profiles of SARS-CoV-2-associated receptors and proteases in a cohort of ART candidates using our previous Affymetrix microarray data. Human endometrial tissue under natural and controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and preimplantation embryos were analyzed. A focus was particularly drawn on the renin-angiotensin system, which plays a prominent role in the virus infection, and we compared the gene expression levels of receptors and proteases related to SARS-CoV-2 infection in the samples. High prevalence of genes related to the ACE2 pathway during both cycle phases and mainly during the mid-secretory phase for ACE2 were reported. The impact of COS protocols on endometrial gene expression profile of SARS-CoV-2-associated receptors and proteases is minimal, suggesting no additional potential risks during stimulated ART procedure. In blastocysts, ACE2, BSG, CTSL, CTSA and FURIN were detectable in the entire cohort at high expression level. Specimens from female genital tract should be considered as potential targets for SARS-CoV-2, especially during the implantation window.

3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124483, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396814

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with substantial reduction in screening, case identification, and hospital referrals among patients with cancer. However, no study has quantitatively examined the implications of this correlation for cancer patient management. Objective: To evaluate the association of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown with the tumor burden of patients who were diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) before vs after lockdown. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study analyzed participants in the screening procedure of the PANIRINOX (Phase II Randomized Study Comparing FOLFIRINOX + Panitumumab vs FOLFOX + Panitumumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Stratified by RAS Status from Circulating DNA Analysis) phase 2 randomized clinical trial. These newly diagnosed patients received care at 1 of 18 different clinical centers in France and were recruited before or after the lockdown was enacted in France in the spring of 2020. Patients underwent a blood-sampling screening procedure to identify their RAS and BRAF tumor status. Exposures: mCRC. Main Outcomes and Measures: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis was used to identify RAS and BRAF status. Tumor burden was evaluated by the total plasma ctDNA concentration. The median ctDNA concentration was compared in patients who underwent screening before (November 11, 2019, to March 9, 2020) vs after (May 14 to September 3, 2020) lockdown and in patients who were included from the start of the PANIRINOX study. Results: A total of 80 patients were included, of whom 40 underwent screening before and 40 others underwent screening after the first COVID-19 lockdown in France. These patients included 48 men (60.0%) and 32 women (40.0%) and had a median (range) age of 62 (37-77) years. The median ctDNA concentration was statistically higher in patients who were newly diagnosed after lockdown compared with those who were diagnosed before lockdown (119.2 ng/mL vs 17.3 ng/mL; P < .001). Patients with mCRC and high ctDNA concentration had lower median survival compared with those with lower concentration (14.7 [95% CI, 8.8-18.0] months vs 20.0 [95% CI, 14.1-32.0] months). This finding points to the potential adverse consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdown. Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study found that tumor burden differed between patients who received an mCRC diagnosis before vs after the first COVID-19 lockdown in France. The findings of this study suggest that CRC is a major area for intervention to minimize pandemic-associated delays in screening, diagnosis, and treatment.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Tumor Burden , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Circulating Tumor DNA/blood , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Cohort Studies , Colorectal Neoplasms/mortality , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Controlled Before-After Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Clin Med ; 9(9)2020 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892446

ABSTRACT

Understanding of the pathogenesis of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) remains incomplete, particularly in respect to the multi-organ dysfunction it may cause. We were the first to report the analogous biological and physiological features of COVID-19 pathogenesis and the harmful amplification loop between inflammation and tissue damage induced by the dysregulation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation. Given the rapid evolution of this disease, the nature of its symptoms, and its potential lethality, we hypothesize that COVID-19 progresses under just such an amplifier loop, leading to a massive, uncontrolled inflammation process. Here, we describe in-depth the correlations of COVID-19 symptoms and biological features with those where uncontrolled NET formation is implicated in various sterile or infectious diseases. General clinical conditions, as well as numerous pathological and biological features, are analogous with NETs deleterious effects. Among NETs by-products implicated in COVID-19 pathogenesis, one of the most significant appears to be elastase, in accelerating virus entry and inducing hypertension, thrombosis and vasculitis. We postulate that severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) may evade innate immune response, causing uncontrolled NETs formation and multi-organ failure. In addition, we point to indicators that NETS-associated diseases are COVID-19 risk factors. Acknowledging that neutrophils are the principal origin of extracellular and circulating DNA release, we nonetheless, explain why targeting NETs rather than neutrophils themselves may in practice be a better strategy. This paper also offers an in-depth review of NET formation, function and pathogenic dysregulation, as well as of current and prospective future therapies to control NETopathies. As such, it enables us also to suggest new therapeutic strategies to fight COVID-19. In combination with or independent of the latest tested approaches, we propose the evaluation, in the short term, of treatments with DNase-1, with the anti-diabetic Metformin, or with drugs targeting elastase (i.e., Silvelestat). With a longer perspective, we also advocate a significant increase in research on the development of toll-like receptors (TLR) and C-type lectin-like receptors (CLEC) inhibitors, NET-inhibitory peptides, and on anti-IL-26 therapies.

5.
Journal of Clinical Medicine ; 9(9):2942, 2020.
Article | MDPI | ID: covidwho-762865

ABSTRACT

Understanding of the pathogenesis of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) remains incomplete, particularly in respect to the multi-organ dysfunction it may cause. We were the first to report the analogous biological and physiological features of COVID-19 pathogenesis and the harmful amplification loop between inflammation and tissue damage induced by the dysregulation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation. Given the rapid evolution of this disease, the nature of its symptoms, and its potential lethality, we hypothesize that COVID-19 progresses under just such an amplifier loop, leading to a massive, uncontrolled inflammation process. Here, we describe in-depth the correlations of COVID-19 symptoms and biological features with those where uncontrolled NET formation is implicated in various sterile or infectious diseases. General clinical conditions, as well as numerous pathological and biological features, are analogous with NETs deleterious effects. Among NETs by-products implicated in COVID-19 pathogenesis, one of the most significant appears to be elastase, in accelerating virus entry and inducing hypertension, thrombosis and vasculitis. We postulate that severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) may evade innate immune response, causing uncontrolled NETs formation and multi-organ failure. In addition, we point to indicators that NETS-associated diseases are COVID-19 risk factors. Acknowledging that neutrophils are the principal origin of extracellular and circulating DNA release, we nonetheless, explain why targeting NETs rather than neutrophils themselves may in practice be a better strategy. This paper also offers an in-depth review of NET formation, function and pathogenic dysregulation, as well as of current and prospective future therapies to control NETopathies. As such, it enables us also to suggest new therapeutic strategies to fight COVID-19. In combination with or independent of the latest tested approaches, we propose the evaluation, in the short term, of treatments with DNase-1, with the anti-diabetic Metformin, or with drugs targeting elastase (i.e., Silvelestat). With a longer perspective, we also advocate a significant increase in research on the development of toll-like receptors (TLR) and C-type lectin-like receptors (CLEC) inhibitors, NET-inhibitory peptides, and on anti-IL-26 therapies.

7.
Clin Sci (Lond) ; 134(12): 1295-1300, 2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599624

ABSTRACT

We demonstrate that the general clinical conditions, risk factors and numerous pathological and biological features of COVID-19 are analogous with various disorders caused by the uncontrolled formation of neutrophil extracellular traps and their by-products. Given the rapid evolution of this disease's symptoms and its lethality, we hypothesize that SARS-CoV2 evades innate immune response causing COVID-19 progresses under just such an amplifier loop, leading to a massive, uncontrolled inflammation process. This work allows us to propose new strategies for treating the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/physiology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Deoxyribonuclease I/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Multiple Organ Failure/immunology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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