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1.
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults ; 24(1/2):54-64, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20235078

ABSTRACT

PurposeMany older adults engage in volunteer activities, drawing meaning and purpose through such efforts. Social distancing restrictions, put in place during Covid-19 surges to reduce the risk of transmission, disrupted older adult volunteers' lives and volunteer experiences. Social distancing measures provide a unique opportunity to explore what happened when the choices around pausing or stopping volunteering were not entirely within the control of older adults. This paper aims to explore the experiences of older adult volunteers as they navigated uncertainties and made difficult decisions around balancing their safety and their desire to continue volunteering.Design/methodology/approachThe authors conducted interviews with 26 community-dwelling older adults, age 50+, who had engaged in volunteer activities for at least 1 h a week prior to the start of the pandemic. The interviews were conducted on the phone or via Zoom. The authors used thematic analysis to help us analyze the data and identify patterns from participants' experiences.FindingsDespite the risk presented by Covid-19, most participants volunteered during the pandemic. They continued some or all of their previous activities with safety-related adjustments, with some seeking new or different opportunities. Participants' discussions highlight the challenges of volunteering during the pandemic and the importance of engagement to their resiliency and subjective well-being.Originality/valueThis paper provides original contributions to understanding how and why older adults volunteered during the Covid-19 pandemic. The social distancing measures provide a novel opportunity to enrich our understanding of the meaningfulness and value of volunteerism to older adults' lives and subjective well-being.

3.
Neoreviews ; 23(3): e212-e215, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753234
4.
Innovation in Aging ; 5(Supplement_1):938-938, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1584313

ABSTRACT

Social distancing restrictions and regulations, put in place to reduce the spread of COVID-19, disrupted the daily lives of active older adult volunteers. One year into the pandemic, we used a mixed-methods approach to explore how these regulations had impacted the quality of life, loneliness, and volunteer behavior of 26 older adults who were active volunteers (i.e., at least an hour a week) prior to the start of the pandemic. All the participants were white and non-Hispanic, and the majority were female (65.4%). The average age was 71, with a range from 53 to 87 years old. On average, participant scores on the UCLA loneliness scale (4.23 ±1.39) indicated a low amount of loneliness and high scores on the Brunnsviken Brief Quality of Life (BBQ) scale (83.54 ±10.97) indicated a high quality of life. Thematic findings from the interviews conveyed that, despite the challenges and risks associated with volunteering during a pandemic, participants valued volunteer work enough to make adjustments or seek out new volunteer activities. The research team identified two overarching themes related to participants' discussions of volunteering during the pandemic: Challenges and changes and Benefits of volunteering during a pandemic. Participants' discussions of how volunteer work changed and why they continued to or sought out new volunteer activities during a pandemic can guide organizations seeking to support or recruit older volunteers, particularly as the pandemic continues. These findings also provide further evidence of the important role that volunteerism can play in the well-being of older adults.

5.
Chest ; 159(6): 2183-2190, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2018, influenza and pneumonia was the eighth leading cause of death in the United States. Since 1950, non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) have experienced higher rates of mortality than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Previous studies have revealed geographic variation in mortality rates by race. The identification of areas with the greatest disparity in influenza and pneumonia mortality may assist policymakers in the allocation of resources, including for the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. RESEARCH QUESTION: Does geographic variation in racial disparity in influenza and pneumonia mortality exist? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database for Multiple Cause of Death between 1999 and 2018 for NHB and NHW decedents ≥ 25 years of age with a Tenth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems code for influenza (J09-J11) and pneumonia (J12-J18) was used. Age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs) with 95% CIs were computed by race for Health & Human Services (HHS) regions and urbanization in NHBs and NHWs. RESULTS: In 1999 through 2018, there were 540,476 deaths among NHBs and NHWs 25 to 84 years of age. AAMRs were higher in NHBs than NHWs in each age group and in seven of 10 HHS regions. The greatest disparity was in HHS regions 2 (New York and New Jersey) and 9 (Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada). In HHS region 2, NHBs (24.6; 95% CI, 24.1-25.1) were more likely to die than NHWs (15.7; 95% CI, 15.6-15.9). Similarly, in region 9, NHBs (23.2; 95% CI, 22.7-23.8) had higher mortality than NHWs (16.1; 95% CI, 15.9-16.2). Within these regions, disparities were greatest in the core of major metropolitan areas. A very high AAMR in NHBs was noted in large, central metropolitan areas of region 2: 28.2 (95% CI, 27.6-28.9). INTERPRETATION: In 1999 through 2018, the NHB-NHW disparity in AAMRs from influenza and pneumonia was greatest in central metropolitan areas of HHS regions 2 and 9.


Subject(s)
Black or African American/statistics & numerical data , Influenza, Human/ethnology , Influenza, Human/mortality , Pneumonia/ethnology , Pneumonia/mortality , White People/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Female , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
6.
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities ; 9(1): 335-345, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064657

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify the early mortality predictors in minority patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). DESIGN: Demographics, presenting characteristics, admission laboratory data, ICU admission, and mortality data were collected from 200 consecutively hospitalized patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 58.9 (15.1) years, 121(60.5%) were men, 143 (71.5%) were African Americans, and 33 (16.5%) were Latino. Common presenting symptoms were cough 130 (65.0%), shortness of breath 129 (64.5%), and fever 121 (60.5%). One or more comorbid illness occurred in 171 (85.5%) and common comorbidities were hypertension (130 (65.2%)), diabetes (100 (50.0%)) and chronic kidney disease (60 (30.0%)). Of the 200 patients, 71 (35.5%) were treated in the ICU, 47 (24.2%) received mechanical ventilation, 45 (22.5%) died, and 155(77.5%) patients discharged home alive. The non-survivors were significantly older and had elevated markers of inflammation, coagulation, and acute organ damage on presentation. Age ≥ 65 years (odds ratio (OR), 3.78; 95% CI, 1.74-8.22; P = .001), lactate dehydrogenase level > 400 IU/L (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 2.97-28.1; p < 0.001), C-reactive protein > 20 mg/dl (OR, 5.56; 95%CI, 1.84-16.8; p < 0.001), ferritin > 2000 ng/ml (OR, 5.42; 95%CI, 1.63-17.9; p = 0.006), creatinine kinase > 1000 iu/l (OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.23 10.3; p = 0.019), procalcitonin > 2.5 ng/ml (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 1.47-12.0; p = 0.007), D-dimer level > 3.0 µg/ml (OR,10.9; 95% CI, 3.33-36.2; p = < 0.001), creatinine > 2 mg/dl (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.29-15.8; P = 0.018) at admission were associated independently with increases risk of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSION: Patients of advanced age that present with elevated biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, and end-organ damage were at higher risk of mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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