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1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e3572-e3605, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575760

ABSTRACT

Advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have made it possible for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to live a near expected life span, without progressing to AIDS or transmitting HIV to sexual partners or infants. There is, therefore, increasing emphasis on maintaining health throughout the life span. To receive optimal medical care and achieve desired outcomes, persons with HIV must be consistently engaged in care and able to access uninterrupted treatment, including ART. Comprehensive evidence-based HIV primary care guidance is, therefore, more important than ever. Creating a patient-centered, stigma-free care environment is essential for care engagement. Barriers to care must be decreased at the societal, health system, clinic, and individual levels. As the population ages and noncommunicable diseases arise, providing comprehensive healthcare for persons with HIV becomes increasingly complex, including management of multiple comorbidities and the associated challenges of polypharmacy, while not neglecting HIV-related health concerns. Clinicians must address issues specific to persons of childbearing potential, including care during preconception and pregnancy, and to children, adolescents, and transgender and gender-diverse individuals. This guidance from an expert panel of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America updates previous 2013 primary care guidelines.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Adolescent , Child , Comorbidity , Female , HIV , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy , Primary Health Care
2.
JAMA ; 324(16): 1651-1669, 2020 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-865967

ABSTRACT

Importance: Data on the use of antiretroviral drugs, including new drugs and formulations, for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection continue to guide optimal practices. Objective: To evaluate new data and incorporate them into current recommendations for initiating HIV therapy, monitoring individuals starting on therapy, changing regimens, preventing HIV infection for those at risk, and special considerations for older people with HIV. Evidence Review: New evidence was collected since the previous International Antiviral (formerly AIDS) Society-USA recommendations in 2018, including data published or presented at peer-reviewed scientific conferences through August 22, 2020. A volunteer panel of 15 experts in HIV research and patient care considered these data and updated previous recommendations. Findings: From 5316 citations about antiretroviral drugs identified, 549 were included to form the evidence basis for these recommendations. Antiretroviral therapy is recommended as soon as possible for all individuals with HIV who have detectable viremia. Most patients can start with a 3-drug regimen or now a 2-drug regimen, which includes an integrase strand transfer inhibitor. Effective options are available for patients who may be pregnant, those who have specific clinical conditions, such as kidney, liver, or cardiovascular disease, those who have opportunistic diseases, or those who have health care access issues. Recommended for the first time, a long-acting antiretroviral regimen injected once every 4 weeks for treatment or every 8 weeks pending approval by regulatory bodies and availability. For individuals at risk for HIV, preexposure prophylaxis with an oral regimen is recommended or, pending approval by regulatory bodies and availability, with a long-acting injection given every 8 weeks. Monitoring before and during therapy for effectiveness and safety is recommended. Switching therapy for virological failure is relatively rare at this time, and the recommendations for switching therapies for convenience and for other reasons are included. With the survival benefits provided by therapy, recommendations are made for older individuals with HIV. The current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic poses particular challenges for HIV research, care, and efforts to end the HIV epidemic. Conclusion and Relevance: Advances in HIV prevention and management with antiretroviral drugs continue to improve clinical care and outcomes among individuals at risk for and with HIV.


Subject(s)
Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Age Factors , Anti-Retroviral Agents/economics , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Costs , Drug Resistance, Viral/genetics , Drug Substitution/standards , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , HIV Infections/blood , HIV Infections/diagnosis , Humans , International Agencies , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Polypharmacy , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , United States , Viral Load/genetics
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