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1.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(1):405-424, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2241886

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 brought about drastic changes in day-to-day life and working practices, and had a profound impact on the mental health and well-being of the general population. Certain professional groups have also been particularly affected. This study sought to explore how levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support amongst social work staff changed during the pandemic. We present the results from a series of surveys conducted in four local authorities (LAs) in England, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Social workers and other social care staff (n  = 62) were asked about their experiences of psychological distress, using the twelve-item General Health Questionnaire. Overall, we found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress increased and, in line with previous studies involving social workers, was high relative to the general population. Yet, most staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, whilst a small proportion reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before. We consider these findings in relation to Organisational Support Theory and reflect on the ability of LAs to provide effective support for social care staff.

2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 11(2)2023 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2217113

ABSTRACT

Measles, a highly infectious respiratory viral infection associated with severe morbidity and mortality, is preventable when coverage with the highly effective measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) is ≥95%. Vaccine hesitancy is responsible for measles outbreaks in countries where measles had previously been eliminated, including in England, and is one of the ten threats to global public health identified by the World Health Organization (WHO). Official administrative 2012-2021 data on measles incidence and MMR coverage in England were reviewed alongside a scoping literature review on factors associated with MMR uptake in England. Whilst measles incidence has reduced significantly since 2012, sporadic measles outbreaks in England have occurred with geographic disparities and variations in MMR coverage. Over the last decade, MMR uptake has fallen across all regions with no area currently reaching the WHO target of 95% coverage of both doses of MMR necessary for herd immunity. Factors associated with MMR coverage overlap with the 3C (convenience, complacency and confidence) model of vaccine hesitancy. The COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced pre-existing vaccine hesitancy. Increasing MMR uptake by reducing vaccine hesitancy requires allocated funding for area-based and targeted domiciliary and community-specific immunisation services and interventions, public health catch-up campaigns and web-based decision aid tools.

3.
The British Journal of Social Work ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1937648

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 brought about drastic changes in day-to-day life and working practices, and had a profound impact on the mental health and well-being of the general population. Certain professional groups have also been particularly affected. This study sought to explore how levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support amongst social work staff changed during the pandemic. We present the results from a series of surveys conducted in four local authorities (LAs) in England, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Social workers and other social care staff (n = 62) were asked about their experiences of psychological distress, using the twelve-item General Health Questionnaire. Overall, we found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress increased and, in line with previous studies involving social workers, was high relative to the general population. Yet, most staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, whilst a small proportion reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before. We consider these findings in relation to Organisational Support Theory and reflect on the ability of LAs to provide effective support for social care staff. Long before most of us had heard of coronavirus, social workers were already reporting high levels of psychological distress compared to the general public. In this study, we explored how levels of psychological distress changed amongst staff working in children's social services during the pandemic. We asked sixty-two people working in children's social services in four local authorities in England to complete a survey about their well-being and to tell us whether the support they received changed during Covid-19. We found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress was high and that it increased over the pandemic. But social work staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, and some reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before.

4.
Training and Education in Professional Psychology ; : No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1931350

ABSTRACT

Telesupervision is an increasingly common practice in health service psychology training, particularly due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about important considerations that may inform the long-term adoption of telesupervision, including its acceptability among trainees, the impact of technology-mediated supervision on critical variables such as the supervisory working alliance, and whether established supervisory best practices can be effectively employed in a telehealth format. The present study provides qualitative and quantitative data on trainee perceptions of telesupervision among a sample of 144 health service psychology students engaged in either telesupervision or hybrid supervision combining telesupervision with in-person meetings within university training clinics in the United States. Trainees completed questionnaires rating supervisory working alliance, metacommunication, quality of supervision, the identified supervisor's use of best practices, and perceptions of COVID-19 danger as well as provided qualitative responses to three open-ended questions exploring expectations around telesupervision as well as perceived advantages and disadvantages. Findings suggest that trainees find telesupervision to be highly acceptable, with over 90% of participants reporting that it met or exceeded their expectations. Ratings of critical variables such as supervisory working alliance, metacommunication, and engagement in best practices generally did not differ between the hybrid and telesupervision groups, nor were these results affected by supervision format (i.e., individual vs. group) or trainee developmental level. Unique benefits and limitations of telesupervision were highlighted. Overall, results suggest that telesupervision is a highly acceptable and beneficial tool in health service psychology training. Considerations for the ongoing use of telesupervision are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) Impact Statement Health service psychology trainees find telesupervision to be highly acceptable and report strong supervisory alliances, effective engagement in metacommunication, and utilization of supervisory best practices via telehealth. The widely recommended practice of incorporating at least some in-person meetings was not associated with higher trainee ratings of supervision. Findings suggest that trainees across developmental levels may benefit from telesupervision as an alternative to in-person supervision, which may ultimately increase access to high-quality clinical supervision. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

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