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1.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 287: 73-77, 2021 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594908

ABSTRACT

Adopting international standards within health research communities can elevate data FAIRness and widen analysis possibilities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mapping feasibility against HL7® Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources® (FHIR)® of a generic metadata schema (MDS) created for a central search hub gathering COVID-19 health research (studies, questionnaires, documents = MDS resource types). Mapping results were rated by calculating the percentage of FHIR coverage. Among 86 items to map, total mapping coverage was 94%: 50 (58%) of the items were available as standard resources in FHIR and 31 (36%) could be mapped using extensions. Five items (6%) could not be mapped to FHIR. Analyzing each MDS resource type, there was a total mapping coverage of 93% for studies and 95% for questionnaires and documents, with 61% of the MDS items available as standard resources in FHIR for studies, 57% for questionnaires and 52% for documents. Extensions in studies, questionnaires and documents were used in 32%, 38% and 43% of items, respectively. This work shows that FHIR can be used as a standardized format in registries for clinical, epidemiological and public health research. However, further adjustments to the initial MDS are recommended - and two additional items even needed when implementing FHIR. Developing a MDS based on the FHIR standard could be a future approach to reduce data ambiguity and foster interoperability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metadata , Delivery of Health Care , Electronic Health Records , Health Level Seven , Humans , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25283, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573903

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has affected the lives of millions of people by causing a dramatic impact on many health care systems and the global economy. This devastating pandemic has brought together communities across the globe to work on this issue in an unprecedented manner. OBJECTIVE: This case study describes the steps and methods employed in the conduction of a remote online health hackathon centered on challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. It aims to deliver a clear implementation road map for other organizations to follow. METHODS: This 4-day hackathon was conducted in April 2020, based on six COVID-19-related challenges defined by frontline clinicians and researchers from various disciplines. An online survey was structured to assess: (1) individual experience satisfaction, (2) level of interprofessional skills exchange, (3) maturity of the projects realized, and (4) overall quality of the event. At the end of the event, participants were invited to take part in an online survey with 17 (+5 optional) items, including multiple-choice and open-ended questions that assessed their experience regarding the remote nature of the event and their individual project, interprofessional skills exchange, and their confidence in working on a digital health project before and after the hackathon. Mentors, who guided the participants through the event, also provided feedback to the organizers through an online survey. RESULTS: A total of 48 participants and 52 mentors based in 8 different countries participated and developed 14 projects. A total of 75 mentorship video sessions were held. Participants reported increased confidence in starting a digital health venture or a research project after successfully participating in the hackathon, and stated that they were likely to continue working on their projects. Of the participants who provided feedback, 60% (n=18) would not have started their project without this particular hackathon and indicated that the hackathon encouraged and enabled them to progress faster, for example, by building interdisciplinary teams, gaining new insights and feedback provided by their mentors, and creating a functional prototype. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insights into how online hackathons can contribute to solving the challenges and effects of a pandemic in several regions of the world. The online format fosters team diversity, increases cross-regional collaboration, and can be executed much faster and at lower costs compared to in-person events. Results on preparation, organization, and evaluation of this online hackathon are useful for other institutions and initiatives that are willing to introduce similar event formats in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Internet , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Non-conventional in English | Social Science Open Access Repository, Grey literature | ID: grc-747861

ABSTRACT

Background: The current COVID-19 pandemic has led to a surge of research activity. While this research provides important insights, the multitude of studies results in an increasing fragmentation of information. To ensure comparability across projects and institutions, standard datasets are needed. Here, we introduce the “German Corona Consensus Dataset” (GECCO), a uniform dataset that uses international terminologies and health IT standards to improve interoperability of COVID-19 data, in particular for university medicine. Methods: Based on previous work (e.g., the ISARIC-WHO COVID-19 case report form) and in coordination with experts from university hospitals, professional associations and research initiatives, data elements relevant for COVID-19 research were collected, prioritized and consolidated into a compact core dataset. The dataset was mapped to international terminologies, and the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard was used to define interoperable, machine-readable data formats. Results: A core dataset consisting of 81 data elements with 281 response options was defined, including information about, for example, demography, medical history, symptoms, therapy, medications or laboratory values of COVID-19 patients. Data elements and response options were mapped to SNOMED CT, LOINC, UCUM, ICD-10-GM and ATC, and FHIR profiles for interoperable data exchange were defined. Conclusion: GECCO provides a compact, interoperable dataset that can help to make COVID-19 research data more comparable across studies and institutions. The dataset will be further refined in the future by adding domain-specific extension modules for more specialized use cases.

5.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 64(9): 1084-1092, 2021 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321726

ABSTRACT

Public health research and epidemiological and clinical studies are necessary to understand the COVID-19 pandemic and to take appropriate action. Therefore, since early 2020, numerous research projects have also been initiated in Germany. However, due to the large amount of information, it is currently difficult to get an overview of the diverse research activities and their results. Based on the "Federated research data infrastructure for personal health data" (NFDI4Health) initiative, the "COVID-19 task force" is able to create easier access to SARS-CoV-2- and COVID-19-related clinical, epidemiological, and public health research data. Therefore, the so-called FAIR data principles (findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable) are taken into account and should allow an expedited communication of results. The most essential work of the task force includes the generation of a study portal with metadata, selected instruments, other study documents, and study results as well as a search engine for preprint publications. Additional contents include a concept for the linkage between research and routine data, a service for an enhanced practice of image data, and the application of a standardized analysis routine for harmonized quality assessment. This infrastructure, currently being established, will facilitate the findability and handling of German COVID-19 research. The developments initiated in the context of the NFDI4Health COVID-19 task force are reusable for further research topics, as the challenges addressed are generic for the findability of and the handling with research data.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Information Dissemination , Germany , Humans , Metadata , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 281: 1027-1028, 2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247826

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought along a massive increase in app development. However, most of these apps are not using interoperable data. The COMPASS project of the German COVID-19 Research Network of University Medicine ("Netzwerk Universitätsmedizin (NUM)") tackles this issue, by offering open-source technology, best practice catalogues, and suggestions for designing interoperable pandemic health applications (https://www.netzwerk-universitaetsmedizin.de/projekte/compass). Therefore, COMPASS conceived a framework that includes automated conformity checks as well as reference implementations for more efficient and pandemic-tailored app developments. It further aims to motivate and support developers to use interoperable standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Humans , Pandemics , Reference Standards , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 281: 88-92, 2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247789

ABSTRACT

Studies investigating the suitability of SNOMED CT in COVID-19 datasets are still scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of SNOMED CT for structured searches of COVID-19 studies, using the German Corona Consensus Dataset (GECCO) as example. Suitability of the international standard SNOMED CT was measured with the scoring system ISO/TS 21564, and intercoder reliability of two independent mapping specialists was evaluated. The resulting analysis showed that the majority of data items had either a complete or partial equivalent in SNOMED CT (complete equivalent: 141 items; partial equivalent: 63 items; no equivalent: 1 item). Intercoder reliability was moderate, possibly due to non-establishment of mapping rules and high percentage (74%) of different but similar concepts among the 86 non-equal chosen concepts. The study shows that SNOMED CT can be utilized for COVID-19 cohort browsing. However, further studies investigating mapping rules and further international terminologies are necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine , Consensus , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 20(1): 341, 2020 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current COVID-19 pandemic has led to a surge of research activity. While this research provides important insights, the multitude of studies results in an increasing fragmentation of information. To ensure comparability across projects and institutions, standard datasets are needed. Here, we introduce the "German Corona Consensus Dataset" (GECCO), a uniform dataset that uses international terminologies and health IT standards to improve interoperability of COVID-19 data, in particular for university medicine. METHODS: Based on previous work (e.g., the ISARIC-WHO COVID-19 case report form) and in coordination with experts from university hospitals, professional associations and research initiatives, data elements relevant for COVID-19 research were collected, prioritized and consolidated into a compact core dataset. The dataset was mapped to international terminologies, and the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard was used to define interoperable, machine-readable data formats. RESULTS: A core dataset consisting of 81 data elements with 281 response options was defined, including information about, for example, demography, medical history, symptoms, therapy, medications or laboratory values of COVID-19 patients. Data elements and response options were mapped to SNOMED CT, LOINC, UCUM, ICD-10-GM and ATC, and FHIR profiles for interoperable data exchange were defined. CONCLUSION: GECCO provides a compact, interoperable dataset that can help to make COVID-19 research data more comparable across studies and institutions. The dataset will be further refined in the future by adding domain-specific extension modules for more specialized use cases.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Datasets as Topic , Medicine , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics
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