Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
Add filters

Database
Document Type
Language
Year range
1.
J Affect Disord ; 299: 393-407, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587438

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: . High-quality comprehensive data on short-/long-term physical/mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are needed. METHODS: . The Collaborative Outcomes study on Health and Functioning during Infection Times (COH-FIT) is an international, multi-language (n=30) project involving >230 investigators from 49 countries/territories/regions, endorsed by national/international professional associations. COH-FIT is a multi-wave, on-line anonymous, cross-sectional survey [wave 1: 04/2020 until the end of the pandemic, 12 months waves 2/3 starting 6/24 months threreafter] for adults, adolescents (14-17), and children (6-13), utilizing non-probability/snowball and representative sampling. COH-FIT aims to identify non-modifiable/modifiable risk factors/treatment targets to inform prevention/intervention programs to improve social/health outcomes in the general population/vulnerable subgrous during/after COVID-19. In adults, co-primary outcomes are change from pre-COVID-19 to intra-COVID-19 in well-being (WHO-5) and a composite psychopathology P-Score. Key secondary outcomes are a P-extended score, global mental and physical health. Secondary outcomes include health-service utilization/functioning, treatment adherence, functioning, symptoms/behaviors/emotions, substance use, violence, among others. RESULTS: . Starting 04/26/2020, up to 14/07/2021 >151,000 people from 155 countries/territories/regions and six continents have participated. Representative samples of ≥1,000 adults have been collected in 15 countries. Overall, 43.0% had prior physical disorders, 16.3% had prior mental disorders, 26.5% were health care workers, 8.2% were aged ≥65 years, 19.3% were exposed to someone infected with COVID-19, 76.1% had been in quarantine, and 2.1% had been COVID 19-positive. LIMITATIONS: . Cross-sectional survey, preponderance of non-representative participants. CONCLUSIONS: . Results from COH-FIT will comprehensively quantify the impact of COVID-19, seeking to identify high-risk groups in need for acute and long-term intervention, and inform evidence-based health policies/strategies during this/future pandemics.

2.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 30(12): 986-995, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of a pandemic on unplanned hospital attendance has not been extensively examined. The aim of this study is to report the nationwide consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on unplanned hospital attendances in Denmark for 7 weeks after a 'shelter at home' order was issued. METHODS: We merged data from national registries (Civil Registration System and Patient Registry) to conduct a study of unplanned (excluding outpatient visits and elective surgery) hospital-based healthcare and mortality of all Danes. Using data for 7 weeks after the 'shelter at home' order, the incidence rate of unplanned hospital attendances per week in 2020 was compared with corresponding weeks in 2017-2019. The main outcome was hospital attendances per week as incidence rate ratios. Secondary outcomes were general population mortality and risk of death in-hospital, reported as weekly mortality rate ratios (MRRs). RESULTS: From 2 438 286 attendances in the study period, overall unplanned attendances decreased by up to 21%; attendances excluding COVID-19 were reduced by 31%; non-psychiatric by 31% and psychiatric by 30%. Out of the five most common diagnoses expected to remain stable, only schizophrenia and myocardial infarction remained stable, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, hip fracture and urinary tract infection fell significantly. The nationwide general population MRR rose in six of the recorded weeks, while MRR excluding patients who were COVID-19 positive only increased in two. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic and a governmental national 'shelter at home' order was associated with a marked reduction in unplanned hospital attendances with an increase in MRR for the general population in two of 7 weeks, despite exclusion of patients with COVID-19. The findings should be taken into consideration when planning for public information campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Psychiatr Res ; 144: 151-157, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433577

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on people's lives and may influence mental health in the general population. In a unique representative Danish longitudinal study, we examined mental well-being measured just before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Danish Health and Wellbeing Survey is the Danish contribution to the European Health Interview Survey. In this study, we included the wave from autumn 2019, which we re-invited in the autumn 2020. The study population consisted of 4,234 persons. The main outcome was mental well-being measured by the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS). Linear and logistic regression models were conducted to evaluate change in SWEMWBS between 2019 and 2020. The SWEMWBS distribution was similar in 2019 and 2020, although the distribution moved to lower scores in 2020 compared to 2019. Mean SWEMWBS decreased significantly from 25.5 in 2019 to 24.6 in 2020 corresponding to a mean change of -1.0 (95%CI, -1.1. to -0.8). The proportion with low SWEMWBS increased from 16.5% in 2019 to 20.1% in 2020 (p < 0.001). The mean change was similar for men and women and for different age groups. The most negative development was observed among persons without depression or long-standing illnesses at baseline and among persons with higher educational level. Among persons with depression SWEMWBS increased. As expected, mental well-being significantly decreased in the adult Danish population during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, somewhat more unexpectedly, the decrease was most pronounced among persons without depression or long-standing illnesses and among higher educated groups.

4.
Scand J Public Health ; : 14034948211022429, 2021 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286797

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study aimed to describe the study design and respondent characteristics (including non-response analyses) of the Danish Health and Wellbeing Surveys in 2015 and 2019 and a follow-up survey that was carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. METHODS: The Danish Health and Wellbeing Survey is the Danish part of the European Health Interview Survey (EHIS). The samples in 2015 (N=12,000) and 2019 (N=14,000) were both based on a simple random selection of individuals aged ⩾15 years from the Danish Civil Registration System. All individuals from the sample in 2019 who were still alive and living in Denmark were reinvited for a follow-up survey in 2020 (N=13,474). Data in all surveys were collected via self-administered questionnaires (web or paper based). The questionnaires in 2015 and 2019 included the EHIS model questionnaire as well as national questions, whereas the questionnaire in 2020 mainly focused on physical and mental health, employment and working lives, and health behaviour. RESULTS: The overall response proportion declined slightly between 2015 (48.4%) and 2019 (47.4%) but went up to 49.8% in the follow-up survey in 2020. Unit non-response was associated with, for example, male sex, younger age, being unmarried and lower educational level but not with degree of urbanisation. In all, 5000 individuals completed the questionnaire in both 2019 and 2020. CONCLUSIONS: The results are in line with most previous research on non-response in health surveys. However, an association between degree of urbanisation and non-response has been suggested in previous studies. This association was not found in our study.

5.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 30(12): 986-995, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of a pandemic on unplanned hospital attendance has not been extensively examined. The aim of this study is to report the nationwide consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on unplanned hospital attendances in Denmark for 7 weeks after a 'shelter at home' order was issued. METHODS: We merged data from national registries (Civil Registration System and Patient Registry) to conduct a study of unplanned (excluding outpatient visits and elective surgery) hospital-based healthcare and mortality of all Danes. Using data for 7 weeks after the 'shelter at home' order, the incidence rate of unplanned hospital attendances per week in 2020 was compared with corresponding weeks in 2017-2019. The main outcome was hospital attendances per week as incidence rate ratios. Secondary outcomes were general population mortality and risk of death in-hospital, reported as weekly mortality rate ratios (MRRs). RESULTS: From 2 438 286 attendances in the study period, overall unplanned attendances decreased by up to 21%; attendances excluding COVID-19 were reduced by 31%; non-psychiatric by 31% and psychiatric by 30%. Out of the five most common diagnoses expected to remain stable, only schizophrenia and myocardial infarction remained stable, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, hip fracture and urinary tract infection fell significantly. The nationwide general population MRR rose in six of the recorded weeks, while MRR excluding patients who were COVID-19 positive only increased in two. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic and a governmental national 'shelter at home' order was associated with a marked reduction in unplanned hospital attendances with an increase in MRR for the general population in two of 7 weeks, despite exclusion of patients with COVID-19. The findings should be taken into consideration when planning for public information campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...