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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335375

ABSTRACT

Inpatients with hospital-acquired (HA) COVID-19 have mortality rates above 30%. Subjects with early diagnosis of COVID-19 and risk factors for disease progression are suitable for treatment with anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We retrospectively assessed the outcome of a cohort of hospitalized patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 nosocomial infection who were admitted to the COVID-19 general ward of an acute-care Italian hospital between October 25, 2020 and April 30, 2021. Patients receiving the REGEN-COV mAb cocktail (casirivimab/imdevimab) were compared with those receiving standard care. Of 34 patients, 11 (mean age, 73.1;9 males) underwent treatment with REGEN-COV and 23 received standard care. The 2 study groups were well balanced regarding age, sex, comorbidities, acute illness severity at diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and all participants had at least 2 risk factors for disease progression. Five of 11 patients in the REGEN-COV group and 16 of 23 in the standard care group were asymptomatic at diagnosis;the remaining had symptoms of mild COVID-19. All patients received REGEN-COV within 3 days of infection confirmation. Treatment with REGEN-COV was inversely associated with oxygen requirement for COVID-19 during hospital stay (OR 0.02, CI 0–0.52, p=0.0174). No 28-day deaths were registered in the REGEN-COV group, compared to 8 (34.8%) in the standard care group (p=0.0339). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed the survival advantage of REGEN-COV group (log-rank p=0.00324). No serious adverse events related to REGEN-COV administration were recorded. Based on these findings, REGEN-COV appears safe and might prevent disease progression in high-risk inpatients with early diagnosis of HA-COVID-19.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318409

ABSTRACT

Background: In clinical practice, the striking similarities observed at computed tomography (CT) between the diseases make it difficult to distinguish a COVID-19 pneumonia from a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to Systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study was to identify the main CT features that may help distinguishing SSc-ILD from COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods: This multicentric study included 22 international readers divided in the radiologist group (RAD) and non-radiologist group (nRAD). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study.Findings: Fibrosis inside focal ground glass opacities (GGO) in the upper lobes;fibrosis in the lower lobe GGO;reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONS in the lower lobes (p <0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGO in the lower lobes (p <0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia or SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score weas created which resulted positively associated with the COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity).Interpretation: The CT differential diagnosis between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through the combination our score and the radiologic expertise. If an overlap of both diseases is suspected, the presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest a COVID-19 pneumonia while the presence of fibrosis inside GGO may indicate a SSc-ILD.Funding: No Funding were received for this study.Declaration of Interests: SC reports personal fees from NOVARTIS-SANOFI-LILLY-CELTHER-PFIZER-JANSSEN;MK reports grants and personal fees from Boehringer-Ingelheim, personal fees from Corbus, grants and personal fees from Chugai, grants and personal fees from Ono Pharmeceuticals, personal fees from Tanabe-Mitsubishi, personal fees from Astellas, personal fees from Gilead, personal fees from Mochida;ST reports personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, personal fees from Roche, outside the submitted work;GS reports personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim;CB reports personal fees from Actelion, personal fees from Eli Lilly, grants from European Scleroderma Trial and Research (EUSTAR) group, grants from New Horizon Fellowship, grants from Foundation for Research in Rheumatology (FOREUM), grants from Fondazione Italiana per la Ricerca sull'Artrite (FIRA);CV reports grants and personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, grants and personal fees from F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.;FL reports lectures fee from Roche and from Boehringer- Ingelheim;CPD reports grants and personal fees from GSK, personal fees from Boerhinger Ingelheim, grants from Servier, grants and personal fees from Inventiva, grants and personal fees from Arxx Therapeutics, personal fees from Corbus, personal fees from Sanofi, personal fees from Roche;FL reports grants and personal fees from GSK, personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim, personal fees from Orion Pharma, personal fees from AstraZeneca, grants from MSD, personal fees from HIKMA, personal fees from Trudell International, grants and personal fees from Chiesi Farmaceutici, personal fees from Novartis Pharma;MH reports personal fees from Speaking fees from Actelion, Eli lilly and Pfizer;D K reports personal fees from Actelion, grants and personal fees from Bayer, grants and personal fees from Boehringer Ingelhem, personal fees from CSL Behring, grants and personal fees from Horizon, grants from Pfizer, personal fees from Corbus, grants and personal fees from BMS, outside the submitted work;and Dr Khanna is the Chief Medical officer of Eicos Sciences Inc and has s ock options. All the mentioned authors declared previous feed outside the submitted work. All other authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: This retrospective, observational, multicentric, international study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Florence Careggi hospital (protocol number 17104_oss).

3.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 61(4): 1600-1609, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the main CT features that may help in distinguishing a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to SSc from COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This multicentric study included 22 international readers grouped into a radiologist group (RADs) and a non-radiologist group (nRADs). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study. RESULTS: Fibrosis inside focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in the upper lobes; fibrosis in the lower lobe GGOs; reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGOs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score was created that was positively associated with COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). CONCLUSION: CT diagnosis differentiating between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through a combination of the proposed score and radiologic expertise. The presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest COVID-19 pneumonia, while the presence of fibrosis inside GGOs may indicate SSc-ILD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Scleroderma, Systemic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Fibrosis , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/complications , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnostic imaging , Scleroderma, Systemic/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Expert Opin Biol Ther ; 20(8): 829-830, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574667

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic and the ongoing, extensive debate about the use of biological agents in psoriatic patients, we felt compelled to relate our experience in the use of secukinumab in the same cohort before and during the lockdown in Italy. Areas covered: Secukinumab was not discontinued, and there were no cases of confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 in this cohort. Expert opinion: In our practice, there is no evidence favoring the discontinuation of secukinumab in these patients. We also present a brief commentary on the use of biological agents in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Biological Factors/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Biological Factors/pharmacology , Biological Therapy/methods , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-17/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-17/immunology , Italy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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