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1.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 144(1): 99-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203828

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the medium-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy patients, focusing on psychological effects and seizure control. METHODS: Prospective follow-up study to evaluate the medium-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on a cohort of epilepsy patients from a tertiary hospital previously surveyed during the first peak of the pandemic. Between July 1, 2020, and August 30, 2020, the patients answered an online 19-item questionnaire, HADS, and PSIQ scales. Short- and medium-term effects of the pandemic confinement and the perception of telemedicine were compared. RESULTS: 153 patients completed the questionnaire, mean ± SD age, 47.6 ± 19.3 years; 49.7% women. Depression was reported by 43 patients, significantly more prevalent than in the short-term analysis (29.2% vs. 19.7%; p = .038). Anxiety (38.1% vs. 36.1%; p = 0.749) and insomnia (28.9% vs. 30.9%, p = .761) remained highly prevalent. Seventeen patients reported an increase in seizure frequency (11.1% vs. 9.1%, p = .515). The three factors independently associated with an increase in seizure frequency in the medium term were drug-resistant epilepsy (odds ratio [OR] = 8.2, 95% CI 2.06-32.52), depression (OR = 6.46, 95% CI 1.80-23.11), and a reduction in income (OR = 5.47, 95% CI 1.51-19.88). A higher proportion of patients found telemedicine unsatisfactory (11.2% vs. 2.4%), and a lower percentage (44.8% vs. 56.8%) found it very satisfactory (p = .005). CONCLUSIONS: Depression rates increased significantly after the first wave. Depression, drug-resistant epilepsy, and a reduction in family income were independent risk factors for an increased seizure frequency. Perception of telemedicine worsened, indicating need for re-adaptation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Socioeconomic Factors
2.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 142(6): 545-554, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717275

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Collateral damage may occur in epilepsy management during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We aimed to establish the impact of this pandemic on epilepsy patients in terms of patient-reported seizure control and emerging symptoms. MATERIALS & METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study including consecutive patients assessed by telephone contact in an epilepsy clinic during the first month of confinement. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, and a 19-item questionnaire was systematically completed. Data regarding the impact of confinement, economic effects of the pandemic, and subjective perception of telemedicine were recorded. Additional clinical data were obtained in patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-five patients were recruited: mean age 48.2 ± 19.8 years, 121 (47.5%) women. An increase in seizure frequency was reported by 25 (9.8%) patients. Sixty-eight (26.7%) patients reported confinement-related anxiety, 22 (8.6%) depression, 31 (12.2%) both, and 72 (28.2%) insomnia. Seventy-three (28.6%) patients reported a reduction in economic income. Logistic regression analysis showed that tumor-related epilepsy etiology [OR = 7.36 (95% CI 2.17-24.96)], drug-resistant epilepsy [OR = 3.44 (95% CI 1.19-9.95)], insomnia [OR = 3.25 (95% CI 1.18-8.96)], fear of epilepsy [OR = 3.26 (95% CI 1.09-9.74)], and income reduction [OR = 3.65 (95% CI 1.21-10.95)] were associated with a higher risk of increased seizure frequency. Telemedicine was considered satisfactory by 214 (83.9%) patients. Five patients were diagnosed with COVID-19, with no changes in seizure frequency. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has effects in epilepsy patients. Patients with tumor-related, drug-resistant epilepsy, insomnia, and economic difficulties are at a higher risk of increased seizure frequency. Telemedicine represents a suitable tool in this setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Symptom Flare Up , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Epilepsy Behav ; 111: 107211, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601437

ABSTRACT

Teleneurology in Spain had not been implemented so far in clinical practice, except in urgent patients with stroke. Telemedicine was hardly used in epilepsy, and patients and neurologists usually preferred onsite visits. Our goal was to study impressions of adult and pediatric epileptologists about the use of telemedicine after emergent implementation during the new coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was sent to the members of the Spanish Epilepsy Society and the members of the Epilepsy Study Group of the Catalan Neurological Society, inquiring about different aspects of telemedicine in epilepsy during the pandemic lockdown. RESULTS: A total of 66 neurologists responded, mostly adult neurologists (80.3%), the majority with a monographic epilepsy clinic (4 out of 5). Of all respondents, 59.1% reported to attend more than 20 patients with epilepsy (PWE) a week. During the pandemic, respondents handled their epilepsy clinics mainly with telephone calls (88%); only 4.5% used videoconference. Changes in antiseizure medications were performed less frequently than during onsite visits by 66.6% of the epileptologists. Scales were not administered during these visits, and certain types of information such as sudden expected unrelated death in epilepsy (SUDEP) were felt to be more appropriate to discuss in person. More than 4 out of 5 of the neurologists (84.8%) stated that they would be open to perform some telematic visits in the future. CONCLUSIONS: In Spain, emergent implantation of teleneurology has shown to be appropriate for the care of many PWE. Technical improvements, extended use of videoconference and patient selection may improve results and patient and physician satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19 , Death, Sudden , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Rev. Col. méd. cir ; 159(1):03-Aug, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-525963

ABSTRACT

La Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS),declaró el 11 de marzo de 2020, la COVID-19 como una pandemia. Aun cuando se observa el crecimiento epidemiológico de esta pandemia, al momento no contamos con un protocolo de manejo de los pacientes con enfermedad renal crónica y trasplante renal que sean afectados por esta enfermedad. Los miembros del Departamento de Nefrología y Trasplante del Hospital General San Juan de Dios de Guatemala, desarrollaron este documento con la finalidad de establecer guías de manejo de los pacientes con enfermedad renal crónica.

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