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1.
J Intern Med ; 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714240

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is primarily a respiratory infection, mounting evidence suggests that the gastrointestinal tract is involved in the disease, with gut barrier dysfunction and gut microbiota alterations being related to disease severity. Whether these alterations persist and are related to long-term respiratory dysfunction remains unknown. METHODS: Plasma was collected during hospital admission and after 3 months from the NOR-Solidarity trial (n = 181) and analyzed for markers of gut barrier dysfunction and inflammation. At the 3-month follow-up, pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO ). Rectal swabs for gut microbiota analyses were collected (n = 97) and analyzed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. RESULTS: Gut microbiota diversity was reduced in COVID-19 patients with respiratory dysfunction, defined as DLCO below the lower limit of normal 3 months after hospitalization. These patients also had an altered global gut microbiota composition, with reduced relative abundance of 20 bacterial taxa and increased abundance of five taxa, including Veillonella, potentially linked to fibrosis. During hospitalization, increased plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) were strongly associated with respiratory failure, defined as pO2 /fiO2 (P/F ratio) <26.6 kPa. LBP levels remained elevated during and after hospitalization and were associated with low-grade inflammation and respiratory dysfunction after 3 months. CONCLUSION: Respiratory dysfunction after COVID-19 is associated with altered gut microbiota and persistently elevated LBP levels. Our results should be regarded as hypothesis generating, pointing to a potential gut-lung axis that should be further investigated in relation to long-term pulmonary dysfunction and long COVID.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313539

ABSTRACT

Background: In SARS-CoV-2 infection there is an urgent need to identify patients that will progress to severe COVID-19 and may benefit from targeted treatment. Objectives: Analyze plasma cytokines in COVID-19 patients and investigate their association with respiratory failure (RF) and treatment in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Method: Hospitalized patients (n=34) with confirmed COVID-19 were recruited into a prospective cohort study. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at inclusion and after 2-5 and 7-10 days. RF was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P/F) <40kPa. Plasma cytokines were analyzed by a Human Cytokine 27-plex assay. Measurements and Results: COVID-19 patients with RF and/or treated in ICU showed overall increased systemic cytokine levels. Plasma IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α levels were negatively correlated with P/F, whereas combinations of IL-6, IP-10, IL-1ra and MCP-1 showed the best association with RF in ROC analysis (AUC 0.79-0.80, p<0.05). During hospitalization the decline was most significant for IP-10 (P<0.001). Conclusion: Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were present in patients with severe COVID-19. IL-6 and MCP-1 were inversely correlated with P/F with the largest AUC in ROC analyses and should be further explored as biomarkers to identify patients at risk for severe RF and as targets for improved treatment strategies.

3.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(9): 1261-1269, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New treatment modalities are urgently needed for patients with COVID-19. The World Health Organization (WHO) Solidarity trial showed no effect of remdesivir or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on mortality, but the antiviral effects of these drugs are not known. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of remdesivir and HCQ on all-cause, in-hospital mortality; the degree of respiratory failure and inflammation; and viral clearance in the oropharynx. DESIGN: NOR-Solidarity is an independent, add-on, randomized controlled trial to the WHO Solidarity trial that included biobanking and 3 months of clinical follow-up (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04321616). SETTING: 23 hospitals in Norway. PATIENTS: Eligible patients were adults hospitalized with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. INTERVENTION: Between 28 March and 4 October 2020, a total of 185 patients were randomly assigned and 181 were included in the full analysis set. Patients received remdesivir (n = 42), HCQ (n = 52), or standard of care (SoC) (n = 87). MEASUREMENTS: In addition to the primary end point of WHO Solidarity, study-specific outcomes were viral clearance in oropharyngeal specimens, the degree of respiratory failure, and inflammatory variables. RESULTS: No significant differences were seen between treatment groups in mortality during hospitalization. There was a marked decrease in SARS-CoV-2 load in the oropharynx during the first week overall, with similar decreases and 10-day viral loads among the remdesivir, HCQ, and SoC groups. Remdesivir and HCQ did not affect the degree of respiratory failure or inflammatory variables in plasma or serum. The lack of antiviral effect was not associated with symptom duration, level of viral load, degree of inflammation, or presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 at hospital admittance. LIMITATION: The trial had no placebo group. CONCLUSION: Neither remdesivir nor HCQ affected viral clearance in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: National Clinical Therapy Research in the Specialist Health Services, Norway.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Viral Load/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Oropharynx/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
4.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255748, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372005

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prediction models should be externally validated to assess their performance before implementation. Several prediction models for coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) have been published. This observational cohort study aimed to validate published models of severity for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 using clinical and laboratory predictors. METHODS: Prediction models fitting relevant inclusion criteria were chosen for validation. The outcome was either mortality or a composite outcome of mortality and ICU admission (severe disease). 1295 patients admitted with symptoms of COVID-19 at Kings Cross Hospital (KCH) in London, United Kingdom, and 307 patients at Oslo University Hospital (OUH) in Oslo, Norway were included. The performance of the models was assessed in terms of discrimination and calibration. RESULTS: We identified two models for prediction of mortality (referred to as Xie and Zhang1) and two models for prediction of severe disease (Allenbach and Zhang2). The performance of the models was variable. For prediction of mortality Xie had good discrimination at OUH with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUROC) 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.95] and acceptable discrimination at KCH, AUROC 0.79 [0.76-0.82]. In prediction of severe disease, Allenbach had acceptable discrimination (OUH AUROC 0.81 [0.74-0.88] and KCH AUROC 0.72 [0.68-0.75]). The Zhang models had moderate to poor discrimination. Initial calibration was poor for all models but improved with recalibration. CONCLUSIONS: The performance of the four prediction models was variable. The Xie model had the best discrimination for mortality, while the Allenbach model had acceptable results for prediction of severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Models, Statistical , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Norway , Prognosis , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , United Kingdom
6.
Eur Respir J ; 57(4)2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277911

ABSTRACT

The long-term pulmonary outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are unknown. We aimed to describe self-reported dyspnoea, quality of life, pulmonary function and chest computed tomography (CT) findings 3 months following hospital admission for COVID-19. We hypothesised outcomes to be inferior for patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), compared with non-ICU patients.Discharged COVID-19 patients from six Norwegian hospitals were enrolled consecutively in a prospective cohort study. The current report describes the first 103 participants, including 15 ICU patients. The modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnoea scale, the EuroQol Group's questionnaire, spirometry, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D LCO), 6-min walk test, pulse oximetry and low-dose CT scan were performed 3 months after discharge.mMRC score was >0 in 54% and >1 in 19% of the participants. The median (25th-75th percentile) forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were 94% (76-121%) and 92% (84-106%) of predicted, respectively. D LCO was below the lower limit of normal in 24% of participants. Ground-glass opacities (GGO) with >10% distribution in at least one of four pulmonary zones were present in 25% of participants, while 19% had parenchymal bands on chest CT. ICU survivors had similar dyspnoea scores and pulmonary function as non-ICU patients, but higher prevalence of GGO (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1-15.6) and lower performance in usual activities.3 months after admission for COVID-19, one-fourth of the participants had chest CT opacities and reduced diffusing capacity. Admission to ICU was associated with pathological CT findings. This was not reflected in increased dyspnoea or impaired lung function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Dyspnea , Hospitals , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
J Neurol ; 268(10): 3574-3583, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141418

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypotheses that blood biomarkers for nervous system injury, serum concentrations of neurofilament light chain protein (NfL) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp) can serve as biomarkers for disease severity in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Forty-seven inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 had blood samples drawn on admission for assessing serum biomarkers of CNS injury by Single molecule array (Simoa), NfL and GFAp. Concentrations of NfL and GFAp were analyzed in relation to symptoms, clinical signs, inflammatory biomarkers and clinical outcomes. We used multivariate linear models to test for differences in biomarker concentrations in the subgroups, accounting for confounding effects. RESULTS: In total, 21% (n = 10) of the patients were admitted to an intensive care unit, and the overall mortality rate was 13% (n = 6). Non-survivors had higher serum concentrations of NfL (p < 0.001) upon admission than patients who were discharged alive both in adjusted analyses (p = 2.6 × 10-7) and unadjusted analyses (p = 0.001). The concentrations of NfL in non-survivors increased over repeated measurements; whereas, the concentrations in survivors were stable. The GFAp concentration was also significantly higher in non-survivors than survivors (p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Increased concentrations of NfL and GFAp in COVID-19 patients on admission may indicate increased mortality risk. Measurement of blood biomarkers for nervous system injury can be useful to detect and monitor CNS injury in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein , Humans , Intermediate Filaments , Neurofilament Proteins , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 21697, 2020 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059940

ABSTRACT

In SARS-CoV-2 infection there is an urgent need to identify patients that will progress to severe COVID-19 and may benefit from targeted treatment. In this study we analyzed plasma cytokines in COVID-19 patients and investigated their association with respiratory failure (RF) and treatment in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Hospitalized patients (n = 34) with confirmed COVID-19 were recruited into a prospective cohort study. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at inclusion and after 2-5 and 7-10 days. RF was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P/F) < 40 kPa. Plasma cytokines were analyzed by a Human Cytokine 27-plex assay. COVID-19 patients with RF and/or treated in ICU showed overall increased systemic cytokine levels. Plasma IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α levels were negatively correlated with P/F, whereas combinations of IL-6, IP-10, IL-1ra and MCP-1 showed the best association with RF in ROC analysis (AUC 0.79-0.80, p < 0.05). During hospitalization the decline was most significant for IP-10 (p < 0.001). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were present in patients with severe COVID-19. IL-6 and MCP-1 were inversely correlated with P/F with the largest AUC in ROC analyses and should be further explored as biomarkers to identify patients at risk for severe RF and as targets for improved treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Chemokine CCL2/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Resusc Plus ; 4: 100042, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 may lead to severe disease, requiring intensive care treatment and challenging the capacity of health care systems. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of commonly used scoring systems for sepsis and pneumonia to predict severe COVID-19 in the emergency department. METHODS: Prospective, observational, single centre study in a secondary/tertiary care hospital in Oslo, Norway. Patients were assessed upon hospital admission using the following scoring systems; quick Sequential Failure Assessment (qSOFA), Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome criteria (SIRS), National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2), CURB-65 and Pneumonia Severity index (PSI). The ratio of arterial oxygen tension to inspiratory oxygen fraction (P/F-ratio) was also calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) for each scoring system was calculated, along with sensitivity and specificity for the most commonly used cut-offs. Severe disease was defined as death or treatment in ICU within 14 days. RESULTS: 38 of 175 study participants developed severe disease, 13 (7%) died and 29 (17%) had a stay at an intensive care unit (ICU). NEWS2 displayed an AUROC of 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.72-0.88), CURB-65 0.75 (0.65-0.84), PSI 0.75 (0.65-0.84), SIRS 0.70 (0.61-0.80) and qSOFA 0.70 (0.61-0.79). NEWS2 was significantly better than SIRS and qSOFA in predicating severe disease, and with a cut-off of5 points, had a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 60%, respectively. CONCLUSION: NEWS2 predicted severe COVID-19 disease more accurately than SIRS and qSOFA, but not significantly better than CURB65 and PSI. NEWS2 may be a useful screening tool in evaluating COVID-19 patients during hospital admission. TRIAL REGISTRATION: : ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04345536. (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04345536).

15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(40): 25018-25025, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780138

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure in the acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is hypothesized to be driven by an overreacting innate immune response, where the complement system is a key player. In this prospective cohort study of 39 hospitalized coronavirus disease COVID-19 patients, we describe systemic complement activation and its association with development of respiratory failure. Clinical data and biological samples were obtained at admission, days 3 to 5, and days 7 to 10. Respiratory failure was defined as PO2/FiO2 ratio of ≤40 kPa. Complement activation products covering the classical/lectin (C4d), alternative (C3bBbP) and common pathway (C3bc, C5a, and sC5b-9), the lectin pathway recognition molecule MBL, and antibody serology were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassays; viral load by PCR. Controls comprised healthy blood donors. Consistently increased systemic complement activation was observed in the majority of COVID-19 patients during hospital stay. At admission, sC5b-9 and C4d were significantly higher in patients with than without respiratory failure (P = 0.008 and P = 0.034). Logistic regression showed increasing odds of respiratory failure with sC5b-9 (odds ratio 31.9, 95% CI 1.4 to 746, P = 0.03) and need for oxygen therapy with C4d (11.7, 1.1 to 130, P = 0.045). Admission sC5b-9 and C4d correlated significantly to ferritin (r = 0.64, P < 0.001; r = 0.69, P < 0.001). C4d, sC5b-9, and C5a correlated with antiviral antibodies, but not with viral load. Systemic complement activation is associated with respiratory failure in COVID-19 patients and provides a rationale for investigating complement inhibitors in future clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Complement Activation , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiratory Insufficiency/immunology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Male , Mannose-Binding Lectin/blood , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
16.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(1): 92-98, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is still incompletely understood, but it seems to involve immune activation and immune dysregulation. OBJECTIVE: We examined the parameters of activation of different leukocyte subsets in COVID-19-infected patients in relation to disease severity. METHODS: We analyzed plasma levels of myeloperoxidase (a marker of neutrophil activation), soluble (s) CD25 (sCD25) and soluble T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (sTIM-3) (markers of T-cell activation and exhaustion), and sCD14 and sCD163 (markers of monocyte/macrophage activation) in 39 COVID-19-infected patients at hospital admission and 2 additional times during the first 10 days in relation to their need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. RESULTS: Our major findings were as follows: (1) severe clinical outcome (ICU treatment) was associated with high plasma levels of sTIM-3 and myeloperoxidase, suggesting activated and potentially exhausted T cells and activated neutrophils, respectively; (2) in contrast, sCD14 and sCD163 showed no association with need for ICU treatment; and (3) levels of sCD25, sTIM-3, and myeloperoxidase were inversely correlated with degree of respiratory failure, as assessed by the ratio of Pao2 to fraction of inspired oxygen, and were positively correlated with the cardiac marker N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that neutrophil activation and, in particular, activated T cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 infection, suggesting that T-cell-targeted treatment options and downregulation of neutrophil activation could be of importance in this disorder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Aged , Antigens, CD/blood , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/blood , Female , Humans , Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/blood , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/blood , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Cell Surface/blood , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Time Factors
18.
Tidsskrift for Den Norske Laegeforening ; 140(11):1102-1104, 2020.
Article | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-757664
19.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 140(11)2020 08 18.
Article in English, Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pneumonia can result in severe hypoxaemic respiratory failure that requires intensive medical care. We wished to describe COVID-19 intensive care patients who were treated with and without invasive ventilatory support. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The material was retrieved from the local quality register and comprises data on patients with COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care department at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 5 March-28 May 2020. The patients were categorised in three groups on the basis of the treatment they received for respiratory failure (oxygen alone, supplemental non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and intubation/ventilator) and described using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of 165 hospitalised COVID-19 patients, a total of 26 (16 %) were treated in our intensive care department. Four of them had do-not-resuscitate-orders and were excluded. The 22 patients included in this study had an average age of 56 years (range 25 to 78 years); 17 (77 %) were men. Eleven patients received ventilator treatment, seven oxygen by mask, and four supplemental NIV. In the ventilator group, as of 28 May 2020 two had died, and the remainder had been discharged alive from the intensive care department, with one remaining hospitalised on a ward. All patients treated with oxygen and NIV were alive and had been discharged from hospital. INTERPRETATION: For many patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure and need for intensive care, increased oxygen and NIV are sufficient, but the need for intubation must be continuously assessed. More than 90 % of actively treated intensive care patients survived.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Noninvasive Ventilation , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Norway , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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