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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335459

ABSTRACT

Background: The global pandemic has mandated the development of innovative online learning tools for clinical year medical students, who have traditionally learned through clinical clerkship models. There is limited evidence as to whether curriculum delivery through a student co-designed online learning platform would ​​be beneficial to student satisfaction, engagement and academic progression for clinical year medical students. Methods: : A mixed methods research method was used to explore the impact of a student co-designed learning pathway. Baseline thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews were firstly conducted to identify unmet e-learning needs in a cohort of 1500 medical students. Subsequent student co-creation of a novel online resource for 500 medical students undertaking their first clinical year was developed utilizing learning software (Sophya). Post implementation, anonymous evaluation surveys were distributed and in-built engagement statistics from Sophya were analysed. Results: : Semi-structured interviews identified a significant unmet need for multimodal, student-centred, personalised learning methods that are accessible, relevant and centralised. Students most engaged with the online resource achieved higher grades (average 4.1% difference) compared to those least engaged. Student and faculty academics used the Sophya platform to curate 364 learning items across twelve core medicine and surgery domains through interactive modules, video tutorials, revision and self-assessment puzzles and quizzes. Within one semester, 72% of the student cohort had engaged with the platform, 946.2 hours were spent on the pathway, 11,480 learning activities completed and 1070 flashcards reviewed. Evaluation demonstrated students valued the structure and content of the resource (average rating 4.2 and 4.1 out of 5, respectively). 90.8% of respondents agreed the platform helped their learning, with video materials on clinical application most heavily utilized. Conclusion: Student co-created learning pathways, utilising interactive educational software in addition to current learning management systems, can assist faculty academics better support student learning needs and create a sustainable online platform that benefits clinical student training.

2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 303, 2022 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the consequent social distancing measures caused unprecedented disruption for medical and healthcare education. This study examined medical teachers' experience with emergency remote teaching during the pandemic and their acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic. METHODS: In this sequential mixed methods study, online surveys were disseminated to teachers (n = 139) at two Asia-Pacific medical schools to evaluate their experience with emergency remote teaching during the pandemic. Subsequently, in-depth interviews were conducted with teachers from both institutions (n = 13). Each interviewee was classified into an adopter category based on Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically, and the descriptive themes were mapped to broader themes partly based on the Technology Acceptance Model and these included: (i) perceived usefulness of online teaching, (ii) perceived ease of delivering online teaching, (iii) experience with institutional support and (iv) acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic. RESULTS: Our participants described accounts of successes with their emergency remote teaching and difficulties they experienced. In general, most participants found it difficult to deliver clinical skills teaching remotely and manage large groups of students in synchronous online classes. With regards to institutional support, teachers with lower technological literacy required just-in-time technical support, while teachers who were innovative in their online teaching practices found that IT support alone could not fully address their needs. It was also found that teachers' acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic was influenced by their belief about the usefulness of online teaching. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that our participants managed to adapt to emergency remote teaching during this pandemic, and it also identified a myriad of drivers and blockers to online teaching adoption for medical teachers. It highlights the need for institutes to better support their teaching staff with diverse needs in their online teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humans , Pandemics
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322851

ABSTRACT

Background: Major disruptions imposed on medical education by the COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid shift to online teaching in medical programs, necessitated need for evaluation of this format. In this study we directly compared knowledge outcomes, social outcomes, and wellbeing of first year student small group teaching in either face to face (f2f) or online format.MethodsAt the end of the first course of our medical program, students were invited to participate in an online questionnaire with 10 quantitative items and 1 qualitative item. These were analysed using Factor Analysis Pattern Matrix and linear regression to group items and assess relatedness. Qualitative responses were thematized using Qualtrics software (Qualtrics, Provo, UT, USA). Summative assessment results were compared, both between current cohorts to historical cohorts.ResultsFrom a cohort of 298 students there was a 77% response rate. Overall, there were no differences in knowledge gains, either between groups or when compared to historical cohorts. Questionnaire items fell reliably into groups that related to either learning outcomes, social outcomes, or wellbeing. Independent T tests showed that format for teaching (online versus f2f) had an impact on social outcomes but no direct impact on learning outcomes. Linear regression revealed that the social outcomes have a direct impact on wellbeing and almost the double the impact on learning outcomes than mode of learning ie. F2f or online (β=.448 and β=.232 respectively). ConclusionIn this study, we were able to show with statistical strength that social outcomes for students such as engaging with peers and facilitator, contributing to the group, and making friends have a direct impact on wellbeing and indirectly impact learning outcomes (such as motivation, satisfaction, integration of knowledge). In a rapidly changing educational landscape, it is vital that these aspects are a focus of design and delivery of medical education. The data from this study supports the notion that activity design and the expertise of the teacher in facilitating the small group activities, is more important than the mode of educational delivery itself.

5.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 541, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Major disruptions imposed on medical education by the COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid shift to online teaching in medical programs, necessitated need for evaluation of this format. In this study we directly compared knowledge outcomes, social outcomes, and wellbeing of first year student small group teaching in either face to face (f2f) or online format. METHODS: At the end of the first course of our medical program, students were invited to participate in an online questionnaire with 10 quantitative items and 1 qualitative item. These were analysed using Factor Analysis Pattern Matrix and linear regression to group items and assess relatedness. Qualitative responses were thematized using Qualtrics software (Qualtrics, Provo, UT, USA). Summative assessment results were compared, both between current cohorts to historical cohorts. RESULTS: From a cohort of 298 students there was a 77% response rate. Overall, there were no differences in knowledge gains, either between groups or when compared to historical cohorts. Questionnaire items fell reliably into groups that related to either learning outcomes, social outcomes, or wellbeing. Independent T tests showed that format for teaching (online versus f2f) had an impact on social outcomes but no direct impact on learning outcomes. Linear regression revealed that the social outcomes have a direct impact on wellbeing and almost the double the impact on learning outcomes than mode of learning i.e.. F2f or online (ß = .448 and ß = .232 respectively). CONCLUSION: In this study, we were able to show with statistical strength that social outcomes for students such as engaging with peers and facilitator, contributing to the group, and making friends have a direct impact on wellbeing and indirectly impact learning outcomes (such as motivation, satisfaction, integration of knowledge). In a rapidly changing educational landscape, in our opinion, it is vital that these aspects are a focus of design and delivery of medical education. The data from this study supports the notion that activity design and the expertise of the teacher in facilitating the small group activities, has greater impact than the mode of educational delivery itself on students' learning processes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Schools, Medical , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
6.
Intern Med J ; 51(3): 463, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160879
7.
Intern Med J ; 50(9): 1150-1153, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803126

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on society and higher education in Australia. In just a few weeks, entire courses have been re-structured and are now delivered online. The need to adapt rapidly has prompted many innovative changes that will ultimately have long-term benefits for medical education in Australia and New Zealand.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Australia/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/standards , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
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