Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27418, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501202

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The occurrence of COVID-19 pandemic had a significant negative effect on health care systems over the last year. Health care providers were forced to focus mainly on COVID-19 patients, neglecting in many cases equally important diseases, both acute and chronic. Therefore, also screening and diagnostic strategies for HIV could have been significantly impaired.This retrospective, multicenter, observational study aimed at assessing the number and characteristics of new HIV/AIDS diagnoses during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy and compared characteristics of people living with HIV at diagnosis between pre- and post-COVID-19 era (2019 vs 2020).Our results showed a significant reduction of HIV diagnoses during pandemic. By contrast, people living with HIV during pandemic were older and were diagnosed in earlier stage of disease (considering CD4+ T cell count) compared to those who were diagnosed the year before. Moreover, there was a significant decrease of new HIV diagnoses among men who have sex with men, probably for the impact of social distancing and restriction applied by the Italian Government. Late presentation incidence, if numbers in 2020 were lower than those in 2019, is still an issue.Routinely performing HIV testing in patients with suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection is identifying and linking to care underdiagnosed people living with HIV earlier. Thus, combined tests (HIV and SARS-CoV-2) should be implemented in patients with SARS-CoV-2 symptoms overlapping HIV's ones. Lastly, our results lastly showed how urgent implementation of a national policy for HIV screening is necessary.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Adult , CD4 Lymphocyte Count/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/diagnosis , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Pathogens ; 10(11)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480903

ABSTRACT

In 2021 the scientific community's efforts have been focused on solving the back-breaking challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic, but sexually transmitted infections (STI) are still one of the most common global health problems. Syphilis is a systemic disease caused by the spirochaete Treponema pallidum (TP) and is one of the oldest known diseases. Its incidence has increased in the last few years and syphilis still remains a contemporary plague that continues to afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite research improvements, syphilis pathogenesis is not completely clear; clinical presentation is very heterogeneous and the diagnosis can sometimes be difficult. Furthermore, few therapeutic options are available, and a vaccine has not been found yet. In this review, we describe the most recent evidence concerning the clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and vaccine prospectives for this disease.

3.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(10): e04828, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460156

ABSTRACT

A multidisciplinary approach appears to be fundamental for the treatment of critically ill patients with COVID-19, improving clinical outcomes, even in the most severe cases. Such severe cases are advisable to be collegially discussed between intensivists, surgeons, infectious disease, and other physicians potentially involved.

4.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(20): 5744-5751, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several cutaneous manifestations such as urticarial rash, erythematous patches and chilblain-like lesions have been described in young adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are present in up to 20% patients, but few reports exist describing histopathological and immunophenotypic characteristics of dermatological lesions in older patients. Our aim was to characterize skin lesions in elderly patients during late stages of COVID-19 from clinical, histological and immunophenotypic perspectives. CASE SUMMARY: Three patients, admitted for COVID-19, and who developed cutaneous manifestations underwent skin biopsies. Immunophenotypic analysis for CD20, CD3, CD4 and CD8 was performed on skin biopsies to assess immune cell infiltrates. CD1a was used as a marker of Langerhans cells, and CD31 as a marker of endothelial cells. In the three study patients, cutaneous manifestations were evident in the late-stage of COVID-19 (mean time from the first positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) swab to rash onset was 35 d). Skin biopsies showed a similar pattern of T lymphocyte infiltration in all patients. Indeed, a chronic dermatitis with perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate was observed with predominance of CD3+ T-cell (CD3+). CONCLUSION: Our study confirms previous reports. Histological and immunophenotypic patterns in our patients confirm results described in the two previous reported experiences. This pattern is similar to what is found in some lympho-proliferative disorders. Therefore, since these findings are non-specific, SARS-CoV-2 infection should be suspected.

5.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(5): e04007, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173788

ABSTRACT

Oxygen support with high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is gentler than mechanical ventilation and may provide significant benefits, but more studies are needed to investigate the efficacy and safety of different respiratory supports in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.

6.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(4)2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167654

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Diabetes may affect in-hospital mortality of patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have retrospectively evaluated clinical characteristics, diabetes management, and outcomes in a sample of COVID-19 patients with diabetes admitted to our hospital. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Unit from 28 March 2020, to 16 June 2020, were enrolled. Clinical information and biochemical parameters were collected at the time of admission. Patients were ranked according to diabetes and death. Results: Sixty-one patients with COVID-19 were analyzed. Most of them were from a long-term health care facility. Mean age was 77 ± 16 years, and 19 had type 2 diabetes (T2D). Eighteen patients died, including 8 with T2D and 10 without T2D (p = 0.15). Patients with diabetes were significantly older, had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, and a significantly lower lymphocyte count. No significant relationship was found between diabetes and in-hospital mortality (Odds Ratio OR 2.3; Confidence Interval CI 0.73-7.38, p = 0.15). Patients with diabetes were treated with insulin titration algorithm. Severe hypoglycemic events, ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemias did not occur during hospitalization. Mean pre-meal capillary blood glucose was 157 ± 45 mg/dL, and the coefficient of variation of glycaemia was 29%. Conclusions: Our study, albeit limited by the small number of subjects, did not describe any significant association between T2D diabetes and mortality. Clinical characteristics of patients, and acceptable glucose control prior and during hospitalization may have influenced the result. The use of an insulin titration algorithm should be pursued during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(5): 329-334, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167256

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China. The global number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 has surpassed 28,285,700 with mortality that appears higher than for seasonal influenza. About 20% of COVID-19 patients have experienced cardiac involvement and myocardial infarction in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 had a worse prognosis. Furthermore, the widespread use of antiviral drugs can be linked to a worsening of heart function. Arrhythmias and hypertension have also been reported in patients with Covid-19. On the other hand, previous cardiac diseases are present in 30% of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. There is uncertainty in the use of ace inhibitors and angiotensin II (Ang II) antagonists in the COVID-19 era. The mechanism of action of SARS-CoV-2 has been elucidated. It has been demonstrated that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the cellular receptor for the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and it is required for host cell entry and subsequent viral replication. The effect of the SARS-CoV-2 infection is the downregulation of ACE2 that may contribute to the severity of lung pathologies as well as the cardiac function. ACE2, a homolog of ACE, is a monocarboxypeptidase that converts Ang II into angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) that with its vasodilatory, antifibrotic, antihypertrophic effects counterbalances the negative effects of Ang II. On the other hand, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and AT1R blockers have been shown to upregulate the expression of ACE2. Based on the mechanism of action of SARS-CoV-2, the use of renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors was questioned although all scientific societies did not recommend discontinuation when clinically recommended. The BRACE CORONA, a phase 4, randomized study tested two strategies: temporarily stopping the ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) for 30 days versus continuing ACE inhibitors/ARBs in patients who were taking these medications chronically and were hospitalized with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 was also discussed. Therefore, the goal of this review is to summarize recent laboratory and clinical investigations concerning the use of ACEi and ARBs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The available data, based also on a randomized trial, suggest that ACEIs or ARBs, when clinically indicated, should be regularly used in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Humans
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e22219, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088863

ABSTRACT

Coincident with the tsunami of COVID-19-related publications, there has been a surge of studies using real-world data, including those obtained from the electronic health record (EHR). Unfortunately, several of these high-profile publications were retracted because of concerns regarding the soundness and quality of the studies and the EHR data they purported to analyze. These retractions highlight that although a small community of EHR informatics experts can readily identify strengths and flaws in EHR-derived studies, many medical editorial teams and otherwise sophisticated medical readers lack the framework to fully critically appraise these studies. In addition, conventional statistical analyses cannot overcome the need for an understanding of the opportunities and limitations of EHR-derived studies. We distill here from the broader informatics literature six key considerations that are crucial for appraising studies utilizing EHR data: data completeness, data collection and handling (eg, transformation), data type (ie, codified, textual), robustness of methods against EHR variability (within and across institutions, countries, and time), transparency of data and analytic code, and the multidisciplinary approach. These considerations will inform researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders as to the recommended best practices in reviewing manuscripts, grants, and other outputs from EHR-data derived studies, and thereby promote and foster rigor, quality, and reliability of this rapidly growing field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Collection/methods , Electronic Health Records , Data Collection/standards , Humans , Peer Review, Research/standards , Publishing/standards , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 79, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Sars-CoV-2 can cause severe pneumonia with multiorgan disease; thus, the identification of clinical and laboratory predictors of the progression towards severe and fatal forms of this illness is needed. Here, we retrospectively evaluated and integrated laboratory parameters of 45 elderly subjects from a long-term care facility with Sars-CoV-2 outbreak and spread, to identify potential common patterns of systemic response able to better stratify patients' clinical course and outcome. METHODS: Baseline white blood cells, granulocytes', lymphocytes', and platelets' counts, hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, D-dimer, and interleukin-6 concentration were used to generate a principal component analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by using R statistical package version 4.0. RESULTS: We identified 3 laboratory patterns of response, renamed as low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk, strongly associated with patients' survival (p < 0.01). D-dimer, iron status, lymphocyte/monocyte count represented the main markers discriminating high- and low-risk groups. Patients belonging to the high-risk group presented a significantly longer time to ferritin decrease (p: 0.047). Iron-to-ferritin-ratio (IFR) significantly segregated recovered and dead patients in the intermediate-risk group (p: 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that a combination of few laboratory parameters, i.e. iron status, D-dimer and lymphocyte/monocyte count at admission and during the hospital stay, can predict clinical progression in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Iron/blood , Lymphocytes/pathology , Monocytes/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Long-Term Care , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome
10.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 20834, 2020 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060282

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread from China all over the world and many COVID-19 outbreaks have been reported in long-term care facilities (LCTF). However, data on clinical characteristics and prognostic factors in such settings are scarce. We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study to assess clinical characteristics and baseline predictors of mortality of COVID-19 patients hospitalized after an outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection in a LTCF. A total of 50 patients were included. Mean age was 80 years (SD, 12 years), and 24/50 (57.1%) patients were males. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 32%. At Cox regression analysis, significant predictors of in-hospital mortality were: hypernatremia (HR 9.12), lymphocyte count < 1000 cells/µL (HR 7.45), cardiovascular diseases other than hypertension (HR 6.41), and higher levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6, pg/mL) (HR 1.005). Our study shows a high in-hospital mortality rate in a cohort of elderly patients with COVID-19 and hypernatremia, lymphopenia, CVD other than hypertension, and higher IL-6 serum levels were identified as independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Given the small population size as major limitation of our study, further investigations are necessary to better understand and confirm our findings in elderly patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Long-Term Care/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , China/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypernatremia/complications , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Male , Nursing Homes , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Med Leg J ; 89(1): 40-53, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039970

ABSTRACT

The activity of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has not yet been studied in a post-mortem setting. The absence of these data has led to the prohibition of exposure of infected corpses during burial procedures. Our aim was to assess the virus's persistence and the possibility of transmission in the post-mortem phase including autopsy staff. The sample group included 29 patients who were admitted to our Covid-19 Centre who died during hospitalisation and the autopsy staff. All the swabs were subjected to a one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with cycle threshold (Ct) values. Swab collection was performed at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, over 24 since death. The following were the analysis of patients' swabs: 10 cases were positive 2 h after death; 10 cases positive 4 h after death; 9 cases were found positive 6 h after death; 7 cases positive 12 h after death; 9 cases remained positive 24 h after death. The swabs performed on all the forensic pathologist staff on duty who performed the autopsies were negative. The choice to avoid rituals and the display of corpses before and at the burial procedures given appears cautiously valid due to the persistence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the post-mortem period. Although the caution in choosing whether or not to perform an autopsy on infected corpses is acceptable, not to perform autopsies is not biologically supported.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , COVID-19/transmission , Cadaver , Postmortem Changes , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Time Factors , Young Adult
12.
J Med Case Rep ; 14(1): 246, 2020 Dec 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992552

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a new coronavirus (named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2) spread from China, causing a pandemic in a very short time. The main clinical presentation of SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19, coronavirus disease-2019) is pneumonia, but several cardiovascular complications may also occur (e.g., acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary embolism, stroke, arrhythmias, heart failure and cardiogenic shock). Direct or indirect mechanisms induced by SARS-CoV-2 could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these events. CASE PRESENTATION: We report herein the third case of COVID-19 autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) reported so far, which occurredwithout any other possible explanations in a Caucasian patient. The patient also suffered from ST-elevation myocardial injury. CONCLUSIONS: Both complications occurred quite late after COVID-19 diagnosis and were probably precipitated by systemic inflammation, as indicated by a significant delayed increase in inflammatory markers, including interleukin-6 (IL-6).


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/blood , Asymptomatic Infections , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Aged, 80 and over , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/drug therapy , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/etiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Coombs Test , Electrocardiography , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology
13.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 14: 1753466620963016, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873869

ABSTRACT

The worldwide spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. According to clinical studies carried out in China and Italy, most patients experience mild or moderate symptoms; about a fifth of subjects develop a severe and critical disease, and may suffer from interstitial pneumonia, possibly associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and death.In patients who develop respiratory failure, timely conventional oxygen therapy through nasal catheter plays a crucial role, but it can be used only in mild forms. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) support or non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) are uncomfortable, and require significant man-machine cooperation. Herein we describe our experience of five patients with COVID-19, who were treated with high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) after failure of CPAP or NIV, and discuss the role of HFNC in COVID-19 patients. Our findings suggest that HFNC can be used successfully in selected patients with COVID-19-related ARDS.The reviews of this paper are available via the supplemental material section.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cannula , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Noninvasive Ventilation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
16.
World J Emerg Surg ; 15(1): 43, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since its first documentation, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection has emerged worldwide, with the consequent declaration of a pandemic disease (COVID-19). Severe forms of acute respiratory failure can develop. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 may affect organs other than the lung, such as the liver, with frequent onset of late cholestasis. We here report the histological findings of a COVID-19 patient, affected by a tardive complication of acute ischemic and gangrenous cholecystitis with a perforated and relaxed gallbladder needing urgent surgery. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old Caucasian male, affected by acute respiratory failure secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection was admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Due to the severity of the disease, invasive mechanical ventilation was instituted and SARS-CoV-2 treatment (azithromycin 250 mg once-daily and hydroxychloroquine 200 mg trice-daily) started. Enoxaparin 8000 IU twice-daily was also administered subcutaneously. At day 8 of ICU admission, the clinical condition improved and patient was extubated. At day 32, patient revealed abdominal pain without signs of peritonism at examination, with increased inflammatory and cholestasis indexes at blood tests. At a first abdominal CT scan, perihepatic effusion and a relaxed gallbladder with dense content were detected. The surgeon decided to wait and see the evolution of clinical conditions. The day after, conditions further worsened and a laparotomic cholecystectomy was performed. A relaxed and perforated ischemic gangrenous gallbladder, with a local tissue inflammation and perihepatic fluid, was intraoperatively met. The gallbladder and a sample of omentum, adherent to the gallbladder, were also sent for histological examination. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides display inflammatory infiltration and endoluminal obliteration of vessels, with wall breakthrough, hemorrhagic infarction, and nerve hypertrophy of the gallbladder. The mucosa of the gallbladder appears also atrophic. Omentum vessels also appear largely thrombosed. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates an endothelial overexpression of medium-size vessels (anti-CD31), while not in micro-vessels, with a remarkable activity of macrophages (anti-CD68) and T helper lymphocytes (anti-CD4) against gallbladder vessels. All these findings define a histological diagnosis of vasculitis of the gallbladder. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic gangrenous cholecystitis can be a tardive complication of COVID-19, and it is characterized by a dysregulated host inflammatory response and thrombosis of medium-size vessels.


Subject(s)
Cholecystectomy/methods , Cholecystitis , Coronavirus Infections , Gallbladder , Gangrene , Omentum , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Spontaneous Perforation , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Cholecystitis/etiology , Cholecystitis/pathology , Cholecystitis/physiopathology , Cholecystitis/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Gallbladder/blood supply , Gallbladder/diagnostic imaging , Gallbladder/pathology , Gangrene/etiology , Gangrene/pathology , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Infarction/etiology , Infarction/pathology , Laparoscopy/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Omentum/blood supply , Omentum/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Spontaneous Perforation/diagnosis , Spontaneous Perforation/etiology , Spontaneous Perforation/physiopathology , Spontaneous Perforation/surgery , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/pathology , Treatment Outcome
17.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 412, 2020 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597171

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2, which emerged from East Asia in December 2019, has rapidly evolved into a global pandemic infecting close to 7 million people. The current uncertainties regarding its impact on Africa calls for critical monitoring of the evolution of the pandemic and correlation of factors that influence the burden of the disease. We herein discuss possible implications of SARS-CoV-2 on the African continent.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Uncertainty , Africa/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...